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fallforward3y+
05-28-2014, 11:56 PM
http://ftw.usatoday....t-sportsmanship

Has anyone read this? Basically, an amateur MMA fighter tapped out after a few good punches within like a minute of the fight to 'spare' his opponent of injury. I don't know if the link will work, but I went UGH! when I first read it, particularly about the way it was being glorified. Last time I checked, sports were about competition, fight until the end. I see it as pure disrespect to the opponent, intended or otherwise.

As an athlete, I never want any victory in a match up because it was given to me. This does not do anyone any favors, you don't get better without facing real challenges. It's pretty arrogant and stupid to actually assume you would have won the fight just because of a few good early punches.

For me, it's actually pretty disturbing that this guy was glorified for doing it. If intense competition becomes taboo, that's the death of the 'purity' of sports

ebsoria
05-29-2014, 05:19 PM
I saw and read this when it first came out.

I :clap: him for doing it. They are at an ameteur level and not getting paid very much, if anything at all. Kudos to him for realizing that he could have hurt his opponent very bad had he kept going.

fallforward3y+
05-29-2014, 11:21 PM
Here's the problem with the whole 'applaud him for 'saving' his opponent' argument

1-his opponent can tap out if he wishes, no need for him to do that. Let him make that decision.
2-if you don't fight to avoid a career ending injury, it's a self defeating line of thought. If you never fight, your career is over anyway, you can get hurt in any fight.
3-he will never be good enough to make it to MMA if he doesn't get training and tests with real, full on competition. You need to challenge yourself to get better.

The fight was by no means over, and could have easily turned the other way. There is absolutely zero proof that he would have won the fight. Athletes want to compete, and if you don't give an opponent your best your depriving them. This does no one any favors.

They may not be getting paid much, but if it's only about the money then why even do it in that case? If you want to fight, you risk the injury. The way I see it, there's just no good reason to do what he did.

ebsoria
06-12-2014, 07:29 AM
Here's the problem with the whole 'applaud him for 'saving' his opponent' argument

1-his opponent can tap out if he wishes, no need for him to do that. Let him make that decision.
2-if you don't fight to avoid a career ending injury, it's a self defeating line of thought. If you never fight, your career is over anyway, you can get hurt in any fight.
3-he will never be good enough to make it to MMA if he doesn't get training and tests with real, full on competition. You need to challenge yourself to get better.

The fight was by no means over, and could have easily turned the other way. There is absolutely zero proof that he would have won the fight. Athletes want to compete, and if you don't give an opponent your best your depriving them. This does no one any favors.

They may not be getting paid much, but if it's only about the money then why even do it in that case? If you want to fight, you risk the injury. The way I see it, there's just no good reason to do what he did.

I understand all of your points, but we'll have to agree to disagree on this one.

I still feel he did the class thing. Watching that fight, unless the other fighter got in that one shot, he was getting his tail end whooped. And the guy who "tapped" new it. I think at that level it's a class act. And if he was that much far superior, I have a feeling his training partners are better then the guy he tapped to.

But, like I said.. agree to disagree on this one.

fallforward3y+
06-15-2014, 07:13 PM
I understand all of your points, but we'll have to agree to disagree on this one.

I still feel he did the class thing. Watching that fight, unless the other fighter got in that one shot, he was getting his tail end whooped. And the guy who "tapped" new it. I think at that level it's a class act. And if he was that much far superior, I have a feeling his training partners are better then the guy he tapped to.

But, like I said.. agree to disagree on this one.

When I said he will never make it to the next level without training, I wasn't referring to the fighter who tapped out, I was referring to his opponent. The main point there was that if you tap out to spare an opponent of injury and save their career, it's a self defeating line of thought. Basically meaning, his opponent will have no future career to save if he never gets a fight.

I guess we will just have to agree to disagree, but I just don't see it. Fights often swing the other way, even when one comes out dominating early. There wasn't enough there to declare the guy who tapped clearly superior. Some guys are late starters, and he was eating those punches not going down. He very well could have turned it around.