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broncos SB2010
03-16-2015, 07:29 PM
WOW!! after 1 year. SF took a major blow in the LB corp with Willis' retirement as well.

ELWAY421
03-16-2015, 07:29 PM
http://m.espn.go.com/general/story?storyId=12496480&src=desktop&rand=ref~%7B%22ref%22%3A%22https%3A%2F%2Fwww.googl e.com%2F%22%7D

Fears head injuries, wow, the Niners have lost a ton! Justin Smith could be next.

HUMCALC
03-16-2015, 07:32 PM
http://m.espn.go.com/general/story?storyId=12496480&src=desktop&rand=ref~%7B%22ref%22%3A%22https%3A%2F%2Fwww.googl e.com%2F%22%7D

Fears head injuries, wow, the Niners have lost a ton! Justin Smith could be next.

Dang, he was impressive

CTM
03-16-2015, 07:33 PM
Wow, yeah I think we'll see more of these young guys who could start on a team just ending up calling it quits because they are concerned about the long term impact of the game.

Wish Borland all the best.

broncos SB2010
03-16-2015, 07:35 PM
Wow, yeah I think we'll see more of these young guys who could start on a team just ending up calling it quits because they are concerned about the long term impact of the game.

Wish Borland all the best.

or at least playing a couple of years, making some $ and walking away young and healthy.

ELWAY421
03-16-2015, 07:38 PM
I wanted the Broncos to draft him, glad they didn't.

munoz1987
03-16-2015, 07:40 PM
Well im glad we didn't draft him last year like everyone on this forum wanted to.

THEdraftnik
03-16-2015, 07:42 PM
I can't relate to someone like Borland.

CRL8
03-16-2015, 07:44 PM
Well im glad we didn't draft him last year like everyone on this forum wanted to.

You can't predict these things. I was a huge advocate and hindsight, yeah.. good thing we didn't. At the time.. I was sick. Would've rather had him than Latimer in the 2nd. Like I said, glad we didn't now.. but at the time, sheesh.

fallforward3y+
03-16-2015, 07:45 PM
Ah crap. Borland was great for the Niners, though I didn't expect them to do great this year I think he could have been great in the future, and I appreciated seeing good tackling from him, bad tackling is a bit of a 'pet peeve' of mine in the NFL today, and I liked seeing someone who brought down pretty much anyone he got his hands on, even a guy like Marshawn Lynch. I guess we still have guys like Bowman and Bethea who are great tacklers.

On another note, this is kind of scary for the future of the NFL. We're having guys retire at an early age because of fear of injuries, and guys who imo look like they could have had a bright future. The game may be ruined if the NFL doesn't figure out a way to reduce head injuries, and ways that are effective. Granted, a lot of it falls on the players and head placement, and I do hear that they are teaching players to tackle in safer ways, however I think what may be key is harsher punishments when guys break rules that are already in place.

Fining guys money isn't likely to help much, if I made the money most of them did those fines wouldn't matter very much to me at all. Guys should be suspended for x amount of games if they break the rules in place, we don't need to make too many more hitting rules imo, I think enforcing the rules already in place more harshly will be more effective.

ELWAY421
03-16-2015, 07:47 PM
Ah crap. Borland was great for the Niners, though I didn't expect them to do great this year I think he could have been great in the future, and I appreciated seeing good tackling from him, bad tackling is a bit of a 'pet peeve' of mine in the NFL today, and I liked seeing someone who brought down pretty much anyone he got his hands on, even a guy like Marshawn Lynch. I guess we still have guys like Bowman and Bethea who are great tacklers.

On another note, this is kind of scary for the future of the NFL. We're having guys retire at an early age because of fear of injuries, and guys who imo look like they could have had a bright future. The game may be ruined if the NFL doesn't figure out a way to reduce head injuries, and ways that are effective. Granted, a lot of it falls on the players and head placement, and I do hear that they are teaching players to tackle in safer ways, however I think what may be key is harsher punishments when guys break rules that are already in place.

Fining guys money isn't likely to help much, if I made the money most of them did those fines wouldn't matter very much to me at all. Guys should be suspended for x amount of games if they break the rules in place, we don't need to make too many more hitting rules imo, I think enforcing the rules already in place more harshly will be more effective.


I still think there's room for improvement with the helmets.

fallforward3y+
03-16-2015, 07:52 PM
I still think there's room for improvement with the helmets.

I hear they're developing some helmets good for concussion prevention, something about how it may help hold the brain in place. I know a guy who says he uses a neck brace when he plays, to help hold his neck in place so his head won't bob back and forth, so the brain will be less likely to move around. There may be something to that, I've thought about doing that myself.

fallforward3y+
03-16-2015, 08:03 PM
or at least playing a couple of years, making some $ and walking away young and healthy.

May not be that hard for them to make enough money to live financially well for the rest of their lives after a few years now with there seemingly being a record breaking contract every year. I wonder if teams will stop giving guys such big contracts because they start worrying about guys walking away from the game. IMO, they should.

Justblaze2729
03-16-2015, 08:33 PM
Good for him, definitely not worth it.

broncos SB2010
03-16-2015, 08:46 PM
May not be that hard for them to make enough money to live financially well for the rest of their lives after a few years now with there seemingly being a record breaking contract every year. I wonder if teams will stop giving guys such big contracts because they start worrying about guys walking away from the game. IMO, they should.

I believe minimum wage is $300K and they only have to play 3 years to be eligible for retirement. Not sure the retirement packge includes though......still a lot more than I make. Play 3 years, have a nice house paid for, with a good education to fall back on....they should be set for life.

HUMCALC
03-16-2015, 08:52 PM
I feel bad for my dad, he's a SF fan

bronx_2003
03-16-2015, 09:45 PM
What a waste of talent. Play 2 more years and get that big contract.. Retire by 30 and set your family up for life.

Thousands of players have had long careers and retired with no problems.

Can't live life scared. What a waste of a career

Dennis.1960
03-16-2015, 10:29 PM
I believe minimum wage is $300K and they only have to play 3 years to be eligible for retirement. Not sure the retirement packge includes though......still a lot more than I make. Play 3 years, have a nice house paid for, with a good education to fall back on....they should be set for life.

This makes perfect sense to those of us outside the game. Unfortunately, it seems many players have an "entourage" to support and waste their money on ill fated investments (opening night clubs, etc) winding up financially broke and physically broken. Not to mention how many skate through college as "football stars" rather than students and don't take advantage of the education their physical skills can provide. How many NFL players actually have a degree in something meaningful that can earn a living? I'd be shocked if 1% of the rookies even consider the logical scenario you describe and walk away intact and financially secure.

bronx_2003
03-16-2015, 11:55 PM
Just went on the 49'ERS forum. They are not happy with him quitting on the team and REALLY annoyed that he did it AFTER free agency.

Can't blame them.

fallforward3y+
03-17-2015, 12:29 AM
I believe minimum wage is $300K and they only have to play 3 years to be eligible for retirement. Not sure the retirement packge includes though......still a lot more than I make. Play 3 years, have a nice house paid for, with a good education to fall back on....they should be set for life.

I'm not sure of the rules either. In case I was unclear though, I meant teams should stop giving players insane contracts like that, in most cases it's not a smart move for them imo. I can't help but chuckle when a team gives into a hold out of a player and gets screwed by that player not playing as well for them. They should know better and learn that when a player does that, it likely means they won't work as hard when they get their pay day.

fallforward3y+
03-17-2015, 12:55 AM
Just went on the 49'ERS forum. They are not happy with him quitting on the team and REALLY annoyed that he did it AFTER free agency.

Can't blame them.

I'm not too happy about it either, I agree with you that it was a waste of a career. I think he might have panicked a bit. People are often saying they can't blame him, health comes first and etc., however football will be gone if enough guys start doing this.

I remember him saying that he thought 'what am I doing' when he was playing through a concussion, and I agree that playing through an injury is a bad idea. However, you don't have to play through concussions now. The league is becoming more understanding, and having a more logical approach to dealing with injuries, instead of the 'tough guy' mentality in dealing with them.

That is the one thing that could make me kind of support what he did, the 'play hurt' culture of the NFL. Although it is dying, some of it is still there. When people make idiotic comments like 'if he can walk, he can play' about Jay Cutler, it is kind of scary, and several players criticized him along with fans. I think you have to be able to do more than walk to play football, lol.

It does seem that the mentality people are having about injuries in football is getting better though. A long with being bad for long term health, it's bad for the game if players play hurt as well. Missing a game is better than missing a season, and despite what people may think, a healthy back up will likely be more effective than an injured starter imo.

A lot of players get through their careers without very many serious injuries though, players should take it on themselves to be safe with their head. I think Borland jumped the gun a bit early.

LSIGRAD09
03-17-2015, 09:55 AM
Not sure. He gets to leave on his own terms, which is good for him.

But it is real cruddy that he leaves a hole for the 9ers. Or another hole. If that happened here, I would be livid.

Dennis.1960
03-17-2015, 10:46 AM
People are often saying they can't blame him, health comes first and etc., however football will be gone if enough guys start doing this.

I seriously doubt there's any danger of that...it's simply a matter of supply and demand. Consider the 1000's of guys playing college ball that would kill for the chance to even be on an NFL practice squad...not to mention the other 100,000 guys convinced they could be NFL stars if they could only get a tryout ;)

broncos SB2010
03-17-2015, 08:55 PM
I seriously doubt there's any danger of that...it's simply a matter of supply and demand. Consider the 1000's of guys playing college ball that would kill for the chance to even be on an NFL practice squad...not to mention the other 100,000 guys convinced they could be NFL stars if they could only get a tryout ;)

I think I could still make a tackle or two :)

fallforward3y+
03-17-2015, 09:20 PM
I think I could still make a tackle or two :)

You were probably joking, but honestly if a guy came at you you probably could. If you wrap up the leg, and pull it down you can pretty much get anyone down. That's part of why bad tackling is a bit of a pet peeve of mine. If they try to juke you out, it's different but coming at you you or I would very likely be able to get them down that way.

Granted, there's a difference in saying that online, and remembering it when your on the field with a guy like Eddie Lacy coming at you and not knowing what the play will be, however I do wish tackling a guy coming at you was more so seen as something pro defenders should be expected to do, instead of thinking it's asking too much to tackle a guy 1 on 1.

fallforward3y+
03-17-2015, 09:47 PM
I seriously doubt there's any danger of that...it's simply a matter of supply and demand. Consider the 1000's of guys playing college ball that would kill for the chance to even be on an NFL practice squad...not to mention the other 100,000 guys convinced they could be NFL stars if they could only get a tryout ;)

I'm probably panicking a bit, but I guess the mind set is a bit scary. Essentially, if people start advocating that avoiding football for health reasons is a good idea, and people start listening, it could be bad. If I want something to survive, I'm not going to advocate it being a good idea for people to avoid it in most cases. I would only say it was a good idea for him to avoid football if he had some condition or injury that put him especially at risk, and if there was a way around it to be fairly safe despite the condition or injury, I would say play if you want to.

#24 Next Champ
03-18-2015, 01:40 AM
Chris Borland was awesome...can't understand the move myself but it's his life....what a blow to the 9ers

ruksak
03-18-2015, 05:19 AM
I'm sure every family that was supported by some poor soul crawling into a coalmine every morning can truly understand Borland turning his back on being able to provide for his family in a way that most of us can only dream of.

I don't believe him. I think he used this as an excuse because he had no passion for the game. Either that or he's out of touch with how dangerous many joe-schmo careers really are. You risk head injury every time you get into a vehicle.

broncoslover115
03-18-2015, 07:13 AM
I'm sure every family that was supported by some poor soul crawling into a coalmine every morning can truly understand Borland turning his back on being able to provide for his family in a way that most of us can only dream of.

I don't believe him. I think he used this as an excuse because he had no passion for the game. Either that or he's out of touch with how dangerous many joe-schmo careers really are. You risk head injury every time you get into a vehicle.

I'm not sure why you think he would feel the need to make up something like this in order to leave the game. He seemed to be credible to me but I guess you never know someone's motivation. If he had no passion or is out of touch perhaps he would just retire without making this announcement.

I guess I tend to take people at their word instead of assigning them my own theory until I find otherwise.

InsaneBlaze23
03-18-2015, 07:43 AM
My 2 pennies on this. Never live your life in fear. He is living his life in fear, letting it dictate his dreams. He quit because he's scared of what could happen, not what will or wont happen.

His loss, as Herm Edwards said. For every 1 Chris Borland that quit, there is 10 players that'd take his job.

The least he could have done was not blind side his team. Pretty sure he knew he wanted to retire or at least was contemplating at seasons end. Let the team know so they can be prepared and try to sign a free agent replacement.

ruksak
03-18-2015, 01:07 PM
I'm not sure why you think he would feel the need to make up something like this in order to leave the game. He seemed to be credible to me but I guess you never know someone's motivation. If he had no passion or is out of touch perhaps he would just retire without making this announcement.

I guess I tend to take people at their word instead of assigning them my own theory until I find otherwise.

I'm just following my gut on this one, I feel he's not being honest. I feel that there are likely many other reasons why, namely, he doesn't have to play football to be rich. He's lucky because he comes from money. He gets to walk away from a dream career because he can afford to.

MOST players, as in, the overwhelming majority of players who have played football, have no such brain injury. It's a very small group who are suffering. Just like many other blue collar jobs; Working the night shift at a gas station, driving a forklift, construction, helicopter pilot etc etc etc.......a small percentage of workers in these fields will end up with serious injury and/or death resulting from just trying to feed their families.

He's just a cork-sniffing rich kid that has the luxury of doing what he wants and ignoring a dream job, and that's OK. But don't get on a soapbox and lie about it.

fallforward3y+
03-19-2015, 12:38 AM
I agree with a lot of what Ruskak and InsaneBlaze23 have said.

IMO You shouldn't live your life in fear, and if he is telling the truth I think that's what he's doing. I'm often an advocate for a 'scared' but sound and effective method for success, however imo this isn't a tactic to help a football dream, it's giving up on the football dream out of fear, so this is different. In this case, the fear destroyed the dream, and that isn't something I would advocate doing.

To Ruskak's points, I agree that many jobs have risks, and I think that playing with safe habits in football has a lot to do with a player getting injured. What gets under my skin are the people who act like what a player does to protect themselves doesn't play a huge role in whether or not they get an injury. You can help yourself with safer playing habits on the field, and perhaps even more so with not trying to play through injury. That's why I think parts of the 'old guard' mentality may contribute to injuries in football, because many players may think that risky playing habits and playing through injury is how football has to and/or should be. Sure, there's a degree of injury risk, but there's a degree of injury risk with a lot of things.

I don't think he lacked passion, because I believe he lead the league in tackles during the time he started. As a player, I don't believe a guy would do that if he didn't have passion. IMO, doing that has a lot to do with a mentality, not just sound tackling technique and reading plays, however also a desire to want to get to the ball, and wrack up tackles. I don't think a guy without passion would lead the league in tackles during the time he started.

However, I do kind of see how someone would scoff at someone for leaving a risky job, if they also have a risky job, or play football themselves. I play Semi Pro, as do many other guys, for no money. During seasons, I take a bus to practice, and there's no injury compensation. Granted, it isn't Pros, but it is competitive football, with some pretty good player. When guys play for no money, it's kind of laughable for people to advocate guys holding out to get the most money they can in a few years, with a 'why risk injury for 'only' a half a million. It's part of why I admire a team that cuts them for holding out, replaces them and has the players replacement be successful.

I will say that it is his life, and he doesn't owe people anything because he's rich, and I think Ruskak does believe that. Just because many would like to play in the NFL, doesn't mean he has to take the opportunity, heck ironically him quitting helps someone else get the opportunity. However, I do understand why someone wouldn't sympathize with his reasons for quitting as well.

I have a problem if he is lying about his reasons though, because IMO it propogates the idea that your still at a high risk even if you have safe playing habits. I'm not saying he is lying, however if he is I do have a problem.

armedequation
03-19-2015, 07:28 AM
seriously? what does chris owe you lunch money or what ruk.
no fall your right he doesnt owe anybody anything. If people think hes faking, listen to the interview. if your just using it as an excuse then you wouldnt do research like he did. I have heard rumblings that he suffered a bad.concussion during preseason but wanted to make the team so he didnt say anything.

certain things require a little fear to keep you in check. almost all of my jobs have been dangerous and i can see where hes coming from. The last thing i want is to lose some of my limbs and have to have my kid take care of me as a teenager or be a vegetable or dead.

yeah the only thing i have a problem.with is his timing

ebsoria
03-19-2015, 07:43 AM
So, could it be argued that some of the less "forutnate" are playing out of fear because they don't have the resources to fall back on like Borland does?? Nor did they have any of the luxuries he had?

samparnell
03-19-2015, 10:31 AM
Doing anything is a personal decision. Those who want to criticize Borland for his decision are exercising their free will just as he has exercised his. Each has a life to live. Perhaps those who are harsh in their view of Chris Borland would not like their own personal decisions aired in public and critiqued as well.

broncolee
03-19-2015, 12:42 PM
What's sketchy about this is that I've heard talk of him wanting to go into sports management. If that's true, it has the sound of him wanting to profit off the people who continue to do what he's now too afraid to do. That's not right if that's what his plan is.

fallforward3y+
03-19-2015, 02:10 PM
seriously? what does chris owe you lunch money or what ruk.
no fall your right he doesnt owe anybody anything. If people think hes faking, listen to the interview. if your just using it as an excuse then you wouldnt do research like he did. I have heard rumblings that he suffered a bad.concussion during preseason but wanted to make the team so he didnt say anything.

certain things require a little fear to keep you in check. almost all of my jobs have been dangerous and i can see where hes coming from. The last thing i want is to lose some of my limbs and have to have my kid take care of me as a teenager or be a vegetable or dead.

yeah the only thing i have a problem.with is his timing

I do think Ruskak agrees that Borland doesn't owe anyone anything, but I felt I should put that in there because it speaks to a mind set that some people seem to have. Some people seem to think that people with opportunities they wish they had somehow owe them something and have to take it, or cherish it, imo they don't. It's their opportunity, and theirs to screw it up or toss away if they want to.

It's similar to someone like Mick Dodge, who decided to quit his job, and leave his home to go live in the wild. If he wants to do that, he can, despite that there are many who may like to have his job, and house. He owes them nothing, and imo people who think he does are likely trying to either be on a pedastal/soap box, or trying to make people have 'extreme sympathy' for them, where it's not enough for them to simply sympathize, they now have aspects of their lives dictated by the sympathy, where they have to embrace everything x person/people have that others wish that they could have. Those people imo should get over themselves.

I do however, see why someone wouldn't sympathize with Borland's situation. He can do what he wants, however people also don't have to agree with his reasons, or sympathize. I have a hard time sympathizing with him, and largely for reasons Ruskak brought up, however I don't believe he's lying.

Another thing I feel I should bring up is how Ronnie Lott said it was a 'courageous' decision, to me that's laughable, and honestly I think he's trying too hard to be nice. It's one thing to say you respect his decision, but to call it courageous? Come on now. He didn't want to do it, and he doesn't have to. However, saying he can quit if he wants, versus calling it courageous are 2 very different things. IMO it was not courageous, and is not deserving of any praise. I don't see how him quitting football is praise worthy.

I made a frozen pizza yesterday. There was nothing wrong with that, however it also was not praise worthy. I expected no praise, I got no praise, and do not think I deserved any praise, lol.

I don't get why some people seem to not understand the difference between saying something isn't praise worthy, and having a problem with it. There were some people calling people 'keyboard warriors' for saying it wasn't praise worthy, that's kind of laughable to me. I think some people are taking this way too far, seemingly thinking it's not enough to say he can do what he wants, now you have to praise him for it. I do think there are some good things about the world getting 'softer', but this is way too much imo.

broncoslover115
03-19-2015, 02:19 PM
I do think Ruskak agrees that Borland doesn't owe anyone anything, but I felt I should put that in there because it speaks to a mind set that some people seem to have. Some people seem to think that people with opportunities they wish they had somehow owe them something and have to take it, or cherish it, imo they don't. It's their opportunity, and theirs to screw it up or toss away if they want to.

It's similar to someone like Mick Dodge, who decided to quit his job, and leave his home to go live in the wild. If he wants to do that, he can, despite that there are many who may like to have his job, and house. He owes them nothing, and imo people who think he does are likely trying to either be on a pedastal/soap box, or trying to make people have 'extreme sympathy' for them, where it's not enough for them to simply sympathize, they now have aspects of their lives dictated by the sympathy, where they have to embrace everything x person/people have that others wish that they could have. Those people imo should get over themselves.

I do however, see why someone wouldn't sympathize with Borland's situation. He can do what he wants, however people also don't have to agree with his reasons, or sympathize. I have a hard time sympathizing with him, and largely for reasons Ruskak brought up, however I don't believe he's lying.

Another thing I feel I should bring up is how Ronnie Lott said it was a 'courageous' decision, to me that's laughable, and honestly I think he's trying too hard to be nice. It's one thing to say you respect his decision, but to call it courageous? Come on now. He didn't want to do it, and he doesn't have to. However, saying he can quit if he wants, versus calling it courageous are 2 very different things. IMO it was not courageous, and is not deserving of any praise. I don't see how him quitting football is praise worthy.

I made a frozen pizza yesterday. There was nothing wrong with that, however it also was not praise worthy. I expected no praise, I got no praise, and do not think I deserved any praise, lol.

I don't get why some people seem to not understand the difference between saying something isn't praise worthy, and having a problem with it. There were some people calling people 'keyboard warriors' for saying it wasn't praise worthy, that's kind of laughable to me. I think some people are taking this way too far, seemingly thinking it's not enough to say he can do what he wants, now you have to praise him for it. I do think there are some good things about the world getting 'softer', but this is way too much imo.

Yup, Ronnie Lott saying it was courageous sounded like a bunch of BS to me. Rang really hollow. You are exactly right in saying you can respect someone else's decision without having to fawn all over it with undue praise and have to add a bunch of BS garbage to it as well. He made the best decision for himself. Period. End of story. Why does it need to be courageous? It doesn't.

fallforward3y+
03-19-2015, 02:49 PM
Yup, Ronnie Lott saying it was courageous sounded like a bunch of BS to me. Rang really hollow. You are exactly right in saying you can respect someone else's decision without having to fawn all over it with undue praise and have to add a bunch of BS garbage to it as well. He made the best decision for himself. Period. End of story. Why does it need to be courageous? It doesn't.

Agreed, it doesn't, I don't get why he felt the need to say that. It's actually kind of sad if your getting praised for quitting, I think that takes things way too far.

ruksak
03-19-2015, 05:58 PM
seriously? what does chris owe you lunch money or what ruk.
no fall your right he doesnt owe anybody anything. If people think hes faking, listen to the interview. if your just using it as an excuse then you wouldnt do research like he did. I have heard rumblings that he suffered a bad.concussion during preseason but wanted to make the team so he didnt say anything.

certain things require a little fear to keep you in check. almost all of my jobs have been dangerous and i can see where hes coming from. The last thing i want is to lose some of my limbs and have to have my kid take care of me as a teenager or be a vegetable or dead.

yeah the only thing i have a problem.with is his timing

Do you remember Glen Coffee (http://deadspin.com/remember-former-49ers-rb-glen-coffee-hes-an-army-parat-530696145)?

He didn't feel the need to rock the boat on the way out. He didn't stir the pot. He didn't start drama or blame something for his decision.

He had the damn stones to say his peace and pursue something that was meaningful to him, without the drama, without the aggravating circumstances.

Why he left the NFL;

"He admitted his heart was never in it"

That's all Borland had to say, period. Don't pontificate. Don't rattle the cage, just go quietly into the night and retire like a professional.

Listening to Borland's words, it was as if he was saying that the NFL is for poor, hapless ghetto byproducts. As if this brutish warfare is well below the likes of him.

People are going to start pulling their kids from youth football due to over-reactive paranoia. The problem with this? Males are hardwired for aggression. As youths, they seek an outlet for this aggression. Better your child be under the watchful eye of trained medical staff and coaches, than to do what I did.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SP20EMmJ7vI

That's what your boys are gonna do without you. That's what I did. I was an amateur competitive BMX rider from the age of 8 to 27. I quit the week my daughter was born. The list of injuries I suffered is too long to list here, but includes 5 concussions, one of which was so violent, I spit 3 of my teeth into my hand.

I now have to wear an upper denture. I suffer from something called Trigeminal Neuralgia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trigeminal_neuralgia) (AKA the suicide disease). My head, face and jaws received so much impact trauma, that my trigeminal nerve was contorted and the pain, oh my god, you have no idea.

I sprained both ankles more times than I can count. I have degenerative arthritis in all major joints from top to bottom. A scar across my head and face where I had 18 stitches applied. My pinky was broken twice and now looks similar to Brian Baldinger's finger.

My point? I did this for free, because I had passion. Nothing would get me off that bike aside from having to grow up and raise a beautiful daughter. My point isn't to say "look at me, I'm Johnny Toughguy". My point is one of passion, and Borland CLEARLY lacked passion to play this sport at this level.

Simply put; That's all he needed to say. Instead of saying what Glen Coffee did (("My heart was never in it")), he had to blame CTE fears specifically, without citing any other reasons. He had to position himself as being above his peers "I don't need to do this to earn a living, but many of them do" [paraphrasing].

His departure smacks me with the burning refrain of a holier than thou drama queen that could not go quietly into the night, he had to make a grand exit. He knew his words would spur national debate and concern. His interviews = intent. His future will undoubtedly include book deals, speaking engagements etc etc....all intent.

On an end note; Am I regretful that I did all this with my youth? Does the pain and hobbling my passion gave me seem worth it?

No, I do not regret it. Many of the best times of my life were spent with great friends, enjoying our freedom and attempting to rebuke this notion that young people aren't indestructible. I had the time of my life on those bikes.

"It is not the things we did that we regret, but the things we did not do".

captainbronco
03-19-2015, 06:41 PM
I'm just following my gut on this one, I feel he's not being honest. I feel that there are likely many other reasons why, namely, he doesn't have to play football to be rich. He's lucky because he comes from money. He gets to walk away from a dream career because he can afford to.

MOST players, as in, the overwhelming majority of players who have played football, have no such brain injury. It's a very small group who are suffering. Just like many other blue collar jobs; Working the night shift at a gas station, driving a forklift, construction, helicopter pilot etc etc etc.......a small percentage of workers in these fields will end up with serious injury and/or death resulting from just trying to feed their families.

He's just a cork-sniffing rich kid that has the luxury of doing what he wants and ignoring a dream job, and that's OK. But don't get on a soapbox and lie about it.

Im not gonna lie i have to agree most players come from nothing and football was their gateway to better things luckily for him he comes from a well off family to be able to quit a job after barely 1 year good luck to whatever he does

armedequation
03-20-2015, 09:06 AM
ruk and fall, you guys had different reasoning with same conclusion but have to say you both said your opinion in a very well thought out and well written. both posts were a breath of fresh air (too much ats lol).

ruk ~ i had not heard that part of the interview where hes saying he doesnt have to play and i totally agree with you. doesnt leave much to tact...and then to say its couragous.

tillman quitting to join the military....wonder what lott said about that....

fallforward3y+
03-20-2015, 04:44 PM
ruk and fall, you guys had different reasoning with same conclusion but have to say you both said your opinion in a very well thought out and well written. both posts were a breath of fresh air (too much ats lol).

ruk ~ i had not heard that part of the interview where hes saying he doesnt have to play and i totally agree with you. doesnt leave much to tact...and then to say its couragous.

tillman quitting to join the military....wonder what lott said about that....

Thanks, my concerns are similar to Ruksak's in the sense that I fear the mentality behind it could cause the game to go in a bad directon. If people start believing that there is nothing a player can do to help prevent themselves from getting injured, it could fuel the fire of the metaphorical 'war on football'. In my book, there is a certain point where the game isn't enjoyable anymore, because it is watered down too much.

The thing is, I actually do like a lot of more 'progressive' things done to help make the game safer, however there is a certain line that I feel shouldn't be crossed, and a certain point when enough is enough.

I'm not a super old guard fan, or player. My style is rooted in trying to avoid letting a guy get a clean shot on me, for the sake of more yards while being tackled, and for the sake of avoiding the bruising. If I get an injury, I would not play through it and risk hurting myself further. I broke my finger, sat out, it healed up, I came back the next season. However, while I'm not an old guard type of player, I still want tackling involved. Also, if a defender doesn't try to hit me hard, I want it to be because they are in bad position to do so, or are breaking down for expecting me to do a move, not because they just don't want to hurt me. If I'm strategizing for effectiveness and safety, that I believe is within the 'spirit' of the game', strategy is a part of sports. However if it's just the culture of the game being against 'going hard', then it isn't. If tackling is gone completely, I no longer even have those situations I like anyway.

I don't want the game to be gone, and I believe that you can be safer while playing. Heck, even if you are an old guard type player you can be, you can still hit hard, just get your head in a good spot.

I also take issue with Lott calling him quitting courageous, and honoring him, I find that very shameful and sad. That is about more than football for me, the day quitting is honored feels like the bar is lowered very far. Some ways that society has 'softened up' are good to me, however I think it is key to know when to stop....and you should stop WAY before you honor quitting.

There are different kinds of courage, and I suppose you could argue it was courageous to make an unpopular decison/express an unpopular opinion, but you could make that same argument for someone who openly supports Hitler. Brave or not, I'm not going to honor someone for openly supporting Hitler. That is a dramatic example imo, however I think it brings light to what you really can call 'courageous' and make an argument for, and how perhaps it isn't a good idea to honor everything just because you can somehow spin it into being 'courageous'.

A society that honors quitting is very shameful imo. It's one thing to say you can quit if you want, however to actually praise someone for it, that is a very different thing imo.

ruksak
03-20-2015, 05:31 PM
People seem quick to assume because he has a college degree, that he's going to be secure for the rest of his life.

And what if that doesn't work out?

He turns down an opportunity to secure a fantastic future, security and stability for his children, his grand kids, his great grand kids and ......what if nothing else works out? This is a tough world, and many times a degree will only serve you well if it happens to be 2-ply and you can use it to wipe your bum. The streets are filled with college grads. What if he falls in love and has twins with a birth defect, his wife is diagnosed with cancer etc etc....medical bills pile up, unemployment strikes.

All the sudden, we're not talking about the money aspect of this decision through the prism of greed. Now it's something else. And that bothers me, how we have attached this component of greed to the money aspect of his decision. Money is freedom, security, legacy and stability. The more money you have, the more of the aforementioned dynamics you have at your disposal.

Being rich isn't just about driving sports cars and squatting your rump in a palatial mansion tucked sweetly in the foothills. It's about food, clothes, options, health, shelter......without fear of it all suddenly going down the drain. Whatever infliction his body may have suffered by way of playing pro sports is, under my purview, unadulterated sacrifice. The same dynamic at play when coal miners enter the depths of the earth, when pioneers ventured west, when a highway construction worker takes his post, when a single mother stands behind a cash register at 2 am in a neighborhood full of drug addicts pining for another fix.

That's sacrifice. That's assuming your duty in the face of potential danger, and somehow I'm expected to pat a guy on the back that is utterly unwilling to follow through with the same sacrificial notion that the workers I mentioned above do daily, millions of them. And they do so for the privilege of a hand-to-mouth existence.

This kid rebuked absolute fortune for his family because he was unwilling, and I'm to applaud this?

No. No I will not. I will not congratulate him as if my well wishes replace the extraordinary fortune this kid just urinated on because the word "sacrifice" is something this generation wishes to remove from our national lexicon.

Have we not heard the phrase "I'll work my fingers to the bone for my family"? Do we not know what that means? I assume Borland does not.

broncos SB2010
03-20-2015, 08:01 PM
People seem quick to assume because he has a college degree, that he's going to be secure for the rest of his life.

And what if that doesn't work out?

He turns down an opportunity to secure a fantastic future, security and stability for his children, his grand kids, his great grand kids and ......what if nothing else works out? This is a tough world, and many times a degree will only serve you well if it happens to be 2-ply and you can use it to wipe your bum. The streets are filled with college grads. What if he falls in love and has twins with a birth defect, his wife is diagnosed with cancer etc etc....medical bills pile up, unemployment strikes.

All the sudden, we're not talking about the money aspect of this decision through the prism of greed. Now it's something else. And that bothers me, how we have attached this component of greed to the money aspect of his decision. Money is freedom, security, legacy and stability. The more money you have, the more of the aforementioned dynamics you have at your disposal.

Being rich isn't just about driving sports cars and squatting your rump in a palatial mansion tucked sweetly in the foothills. It's about food, clothes, options, health, shelter......without fear of it all suddenly going down the drain. Whatever infliction his body may have suffered by way of playing pro sports is, under my purview, unadulterated sacrifice. The same dynamic at play when coal miners enter the depths of the earth, when pioneers ventured west, when a highway construction worker takes his post, when a single mother stands behind a cash register at 2 am in a neighborhood full of drug addicts pining for another fix.

That's sacrifice. That's assuming your duty in the face of potential danger, and somehow I'm expected to pat a guy on the back that is utterly unwilling to follow through with the same sacrificial notion that the workers I mentioned above do daily, millions of them. And they do so for the privilege of a hand-to-mouth existence.

This kid rebuked absolute fortune for his family because he was unwilling, and I'm to applaud this?

No. No I will not. I will not congratulate him as if my well wishes replace the extraordinary fortune this kid just urinated on because the word "sacrifice" is something this generation wishes to remove from our national lexicon.

Have we not heard the phrase "I'll work my fingers to the bone for my family"? Do we not know what that means? I assume Borland does not.

He got paid $1,000,000...maybe he thinks that is enough to see him through the next phase of his life and maybe he has dreams and ambitions beyond the football field that you and I know nothing about..........you don't have to applaud but you don't have to bash either.

fallforward3y+
03-20-2015, 11:51 PM
People seem quick to assume because he has a college degree, that he's going to be secure for the rest of his life.

And what if that doesn't work out?

He turns down an opportunity to secure a fantastic future, security and stability for his children, his grand kids, his great grand kids and ......what if nothing else works out? This is a tough world, and many times a degree will only serve you well if it happens to be 2-ply and you can use it to wipe your bum. The streets are filled with college grads. What if he falls in love and has twins with a birth defect, his wife is diagnosed with cancer etc etc....medical bills pile up, unemployment strikes.

All the sudden, we're not talking about the money aspect of this decision through the prism of greed. Now it's something else. And that bothers me, how we have attached this component of greed to the money aspect of his decision. Money is freedom, security, legacy and stability. The more money you have, the more of the aforementioned dynamics you have at your disposal.

Being rich isn't just about driving sports cars and squatting your rump in a palatial mansion tucked sweetly in the foothills. It's about food, clothes, options, health, shelter......without fear of it all suddenly going down the drain. Whatever infliction his body may have suffered by way of playing pro sports is, under my purview, unadulterated sacrifice. The same dynamic at play when coal miners enter the depths of the earth, when pioneers ventured west, when a highway construction worker takes his post, when a single mother stands behind a cash register at 2 am in a neighborhood full of drug addicts pining for another fix.

That's sacrifice. That's assuming your duty in the face of potential danger, and somehow I'm expected to pat a guy on the back that is utterly unwilling to follow through with the same sacrificial notion that the workers I mentioned above do daily, millions of them. And they do so for the privilege of a hand-to-mouth existence.

This kid rebuked absolute fortune for his family because he was unwilling, and I'm to applaud this?

No. No I will not. I will not congratulate him as if my well wishes replace the extraordinary fortune this kid just urinated on because the word "sacrifice" is something this generation wishes to remove from our national lexicon.

Have we not heard the phrase "I'll work my fingers to the bone for my family"? Do we not know what that means? I assume Borland does not.

It is indeed true that being a college graduate doesn't necessarily mean you will be financially secure imo, and that is unfortunate to me. Fortunately, at this point there are a lot of aide programs for people, however you probably would not want to go through college to end up needing public assistance. I have a lot of concerns about picking a major that I will be able to find a job with, that I would actually enjoy.

It's hard to say what Borland's future will be like, however many ex-NFLers do not live financially well after their careers. For a guy in his situation, starting a business may be a good idea. I don't know what his degree is, but taking a business class may be a good idea if he hasn't already. Fortunately for him, he would likely be able to try starting a business without risking too many financial woes, because he can afford to lose the money it takes to start one and still be well off if the business fails.

ruksak
03-21-2015, 12:32 AM
He got paid $1,000,000...maybe he thinks that is enough to see him through the next phase of his life and maybe he has dreams and ambitions beyond the football field that you and I know nothing about..........you don't have to applaud but you don't have to bash either.

My principle beefs with him are;

1) The narrative he gave that suggested most NFL players are hapless ghetto losers who must engage in bloodsport to survive.
2) He rang the alarm, stirring fears and besmirching the very same organizations which gave him that $1,000,000 (Both the NFL and the 49ers).
3) In no way do I believe that CTE fears were the only reason he left. The fact that anyone believes this is beyond me. IMO, he's more full of crap than a roadside toilet.

His words left the impression on me that he just didn't want to be a pro player, which is OK. I understand that. But that's all he needed to say. Maybe he felt just walking away without some dramatic reason as to why would be emasculating?

ruksak
03-21-2015, 12:34 AM
It is indeed true that being a college graduate doesn't necessarily mean you will be financially secure imo, and that is unfortunate to me. Fortunately, at this point there are a lot of aide programs for people, however you probably would not want to go through college to end up needing public assistance. I have a lot of concerns about picking a major that I will be able to find a job with, that I would actually enjoy.

It's hard to say what Borland's future will be like, however many ex-NFLers do not live financially well after their careers. For a guy in his situation, starting a business may be a good idea. I don't know what his degree is, but taking a business class may be a good idea if he hasn't already. Fortunately for him, he would likely be able to try starting a business without risking too many financial woes, because he can afford to lose the money it takes to start one and still be well off if the business fails.

I'm gonna laugh if he takes up a career in sports medicine.

Anywho......book deals, interviews, and speaking engagements are going to line his pockets for the mean time. ...all thanks to his "reason" why he left.

broncolee
03-21-2015, 04:49 AM
It's my understanding that Borland's family is pretty well off financially so I don't think we need worry that he's going to go broke. He will have support to prevent that from happening.

I don't see how concern about head trauma is the only reason he quit. There's probably more to it but unless he says what it is, I don't think we will know the whole story.

ruksak
03-21-2015, 07:38 AM
Chris Borland; America's bravest quitter.