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View Full Version : Wyatt Sexton has Lyme disease (AKA "What in hell is in the water in Tallahassee?")



Jared
06-16-2005, 04:43 PM
http://sports.espn.go.com/ncf/news/story?id=2084954

OrangeShadow
06-16-2005, 04:47 PM
Thats one of the strangest stories ive read in quite a while

CGYBroncosFan
06-16-2005, 06:13 PM
same with me. Maybe he likes that place :confused:

Skywalker
06-16-2005, 06:43 PM
he had to be on some high drugs.

CGYBroncosFan
06-16-2005, 07:10 PM
alot of drugs he must be on!

NJBRONCOSFAN
06-17-2005, 12:30 PM
my guess is acid.

aberdien
06-17-2005, 02:23 PM
That'll be hard to recover from. Nobody, I repeat, nobody, should claim to be, 'God' or 'The Son of God.'

broncofan303
06-19-2005, 03:17 PM
That'll be hard to recover from. Nobody, I repeat, nobody, should claim to be, 'God' or 'The Son of God.'

Word...Completely Agree...

he's defintely messed up though, its a bummer too, he had a lot of potential, some screws must of fell loose somewhere down the road...

FSU will do fine though, they have a QB that can run and pass, Xavier Lee...a great athlete...

nas1
06-19-2005, 06:46 PM
That Guy Has More Problems Than A Mathbook,we Can Only Pray For Him.

NJBRONCOSFAN
06-20-2005, 05:28 AM
Nobody, I repeat, nobody, should claim to be, 'God' or 'The Son of God.'
Not even Jesus Christ himself.

BroncoInATL
06-21-2005, 02:54 PM
I'd bet he suffering from Bipolar II disorder or Paranoia or schizophrenia.

With 300mg + of Seroquel and Effexor XR should do him some good along with a 72hr stay at a sanatorium.

I am speaking from expierence here.

SoDakTE87
07-09-2005, 04:28 PM
I don't know if you'd seen how he was acting all strange and got arrested that one night in Florida but it turns out that he had advanced lyme disease. He's out for the year now.

Jared
07-09-2005, 04:30 PM
Well, I take back the smart ass title of this thread then.

Thanks for the update.

That is sad, really.

dandaman23
07-10-2005, 04:18 AM
I'd bet he suffering from Bipolar II disorder or Paranoia or schizophrenia.

With 300mg + of Seroquel and Effexor XR should do him some good along with a 72hr stay at a sanatorium.

I am speaking from expierence here.

Ya, thats what I was thinking too.. :heh:

defense!!!
07-10-2005, 12:33 PM
Not even Jesus Christ himself.

Then the high priest stood up before them and asked Jesus, "Are you not going to answer? What is this testimony that these men are bringing against you?" But Jesus remained silent and gave no answer. Again the high priest asked him, "Are you the Christ*, the Son of the Blessed One?" "I am," said Jesus. "And you will see the Son of Man sitting at the right hand of the Mighty One and coming on the clouds of heaven." Mark 14:60

*OR MESSIAH

Skywalker
07-10-2005, 10:04 PM
What exactly is Lyme disease?

Jared
07-10-2005, 10:09 PM
What exactly is Lyme disease?


Oh, it can be a bad thing if not caught in time. Not deadly, just annoying. This is from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) handbook:

Lyme disease was named in 1977 when arthritis was observed in a cluster of children in and around Lyme, Connecticut.

Other clinical symptoms and environmental conditions suggested that this was an infectious disease probably transmitted by an arthropod.

Further investigation revealed that Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi. These bacteria are transmitted to humans by the bite of infected deer ticks and caused more than 23,000 infections in the United States in 2002.

Black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) are responsible for transmitting Lyme disease bacteria to humans in the northeastern and north-central United States. On the Pacific Coast, the bacteria are transmitted to humans by the western black-legged tick (Ixodes pacificus). Ixodes ticks are much smaller than common dog and cattle ticks. In their larval and nymphal stages, they are no bigger than a pinhead. Ticks feed by inserting their mouths into the skin of a host and slowly take in blood. Ixodes ticks are most likely to transmit infection after feeding for two or more days.

In the United States, Lyme disease is mostly localized to states in the northeastern, mid-Atlantic, and upper north-central regions, and to several counties in northwestern California. In 2002, 23,763 cases of Lyme disease were reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Ninety-five percent of these cases were from the states of Connecticut, Delaware, Rhode Island, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.

Lyme disease most often presents with a characteristic "bull's-eye" rash, erythema migrans, accompanied by nonspecific symptoms such as fever, malaise, fatigue, headache, muscle aches (myalgia), and joint aches (arthralgia).

The incubation period from infection to onset of erythema migrans is typically 7 to 14 days but may be as short as 3 days and as long as 30 days.

Some infected individuals have no recognized illness (asymptomatic infection determined by serological testing), or manifest only non-specific symptoms such as fever, headache, fatigue, and myalgia.

Lyme disease spirochetes disseminate from the site of the tick bite by cutaneous, lymphatic and blood borne routes. The signs of early disseminated infection usually occur days to weeks after the appearance of a solitary erythema migrans lesion. In addition to multiple (secondary) erythema migrans lesions, early disseminated infection may be manifest as disease of the nervous system, the musculoskeletal system, or the heart. Early neurologic manifestations include lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuropathy (especially facial nerve palsy), and radiculoneuritis. Musculoskeletal manifestations may include migratory joint and muscle pains with or without objective signs of joint swelling. Cardiac manifestations are rare but may include myocarditis and transient atrioventricular blocks of varying degree.

B. burgdorferi infection in the untreated or inadequately treated patient may progress to late disseminated disease weeks to months after infection. The most common objective manifestation of late disseminated Lyme disease is intermittent swelling and pain of one or a few joints, usually large, weight-bearing joints such as the knee. Some patients develop chronic axonal polyneuropathy, or encephalopathy, the latter usually manifested by cognitive disorders, sleep disturbance, fatigue, and personality changes. Infrequently, Lyme disease morbidity may be severe, chronic, and disabling. An ill-defined post-Lyme disease syndrome occurs in some persons following treatment for Lyme disease. Lyme disease is rarely, if ever, fatal.

Skywalker
07-11-2005, 12:30 AM
Oh, it can be a bad thing if not caught in time. Not deadly, just annoying. This is from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) handbook:

Lyme disease was named in 1977 when arthritis was observed in a cluster of children in and around Lyme, Connecticut.

Other clinical symptoms and environmental conditions suggested that this was an infectious disease probably transmitted by an arthropod.

Further investigation revealed that Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi. These bacteria are transmitted to humans by the bite of infected deer ticks and caused more than 23,000 infections in the United States in 2002.

Black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) are responsible for transmitting Lyme disease bacteria to humans in the northeastern and north-central United States. On the Pacific Coast, the bacteria are transmitted to humans by the western black-legged tick (Ixodes pacificus). Ixodes ticks are much smaller than common dog and cattle ticks. In their larval and nymphal stages, they are no bigger than a pinhead. Ticks feed by inserting their mouths into the skin of a host and slowly take in blood. Ixodes ticks are most likely to transmit infection after feeding for two or more days.

In the United States, Lyme disease is mostly localized to states in the northeastern, mid-Atlantic, and upper north-central regions, and to several counties in northwestern California. In 2002, 23,763 cases of Lyme disease were reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Ninety-five percent of these cases were from the states of Connecticut, Delaware, Rhode Island, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.

Lyme disease most often presents with a characteristic "bull's-eye" rash, erythema migrans, accompanied by nonspecific symptoms such as fever, malaise, fatigue, headache, muscle aches (myalgia), and joint aches (arthralgia).

The incubation period from infection to onset of erythema migrans is typically 7 to 14 days but may be as short as 3 days and as long as 30 days.

Some infected individuals have no recognized illness (asymptomatic infection determined by serological testing), or manifest only non-specific symptoms such as fever, headache, fatigue, and myalgia.

Lyme disease spirochetes disseminate from the site of the tick bite by cutaneous, lymphatic and blood borne routes. The signs of early disseminated infection usually occur days to weeks after the appearance of a solitary erythema migrans lesion. In addition to multiple (secondary) erythema migrans lesions, early disseminated infection may be manifest as disease of the nervous system, the musculoskeletal system, or the heart. Early neurologic manifestations include lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuropathy (especially facial nerve palsy), and radiculoneuritis. Musculoskeletal manifestations may include migratory joint and muscle pains with or without objective signs of joint swelling. Cardiac manifestations are rare but may include myocarditis and transient atrioventricular blocks of varying degree.

B. burgdorferi infection in the untreated or inadequately treated patient may progress to late disseminated disease weeks to months after infection. The most common objective manifestation of late disseminated Lyme disease is intermittent swelling and pain of one or a few joints, usually large, weight-bearing joints such as the knee. Some patients develop chronic axonal polyneuropathy, or encephalopathy, the latter usually manifested by cognitive disorders, sleep disturbance, fatigue, and personality changes. Infrequently, Lyme disease morbidity may be severe, chronic, and disabling. An ill-defined post-Lyme disease syndrome occurs in some persons following treatment for Lyme disease. Lyme disease is rarely, if ever, fatal.


thanks for the info :beer: