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CutlerFan13
07-04-2007, 12:39 AM
as in title, Dominic Rhodes is out for the first 4 games next year for violating a substance abuse policy, just another player to get hot water

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=2925395

Why does it seem that more players are getting into trouble this year than previous years even though Goodell laid down strict guildlines???

TheWookieeBronco
07-04-2007, 12:52 AM
as in title, Dominic Rhodes is out for the first 4 games next year for violating a substance abuse policy, just another player to get hot water

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=2925395

Why does it seem that more players are getting into trouble this year than previous years even though Goodell laid down strict guildlines???

Dominic Rhodes is a Faider. Not a Bronco. This means it goes in the Other NFL teams forum.

Morambar
07-04-2007, 12:57 AM
Probably because Godell is going out of his way to insure that in his League getting in trouble will actually get you in trouble. It probably didn't help that we had a player request permission to leave his native state to play in the Super Bowl after being indicted on weapons charges; under Godell I don't think we'll see much more of that, because if you get indicted on weapons charges you won't be playing in the Super Bowl regardless. Personally, I don't put recreational drug use in the same class as performance enhancing drugs, felony assaults and the like, but generally speaking I strongly support Godells position. The NFL shouldn't be a place where people count on ignoring the law because of their fame and fortune, and shouldn't send the message to players entering the League, "who cares if you get into a bar fight every other night and arm several small Mideast insurgencies? As long as your lawyer gets you off and you keep having 1000 yard seasons, not us". Bottom line: A professional athletes (or anyone elses) God given talent doesn't exempt them from the law, and the impression it does is something that needs to be strongly discouraged in future players, not encouraged by ignoring it. That's tacitly condoning it, which Godell refuses to do.

NinjaPirateFunk
07-04-2007, 01:16 AM
maybe players do it because it's still not strict punishment. yeah, pacman got a year but really, he should've anyway. players still aren't scared. this is obvious when you go to PFT and see their "turd watch". dozens upon dozens of players, sometimes in a month no less, are in trouble with the law somehow. i wouldn't be scared, either if only about one in every ten guys actually got a real punishment. goodell needs to start crackin heads and giving out serious suspensions. you smoke pot? you fight in bars? you drive drunk? get the **** out of this league. how someone can make that much money and not act liek an adult is so foolish. the msg we're sending to kids is a complete and total joke. every kid nowadays is dancing and signing balls and wanting to be like TO or talking stupid amounts of smack like chad johnson. is it harmless? pretty much. should we be teaching our kids that this is what football's about? hell no. kick out the rotten apples and you'll start finding better fruit growing on the trees. i think alot of it has to do with immature man-boys who've never been told no, being given huge amounts of money, our on their own at 22 years old, when they're no where near as mature as someone who has lived a normal non-sports life. this leads to all the endless BS we see with young players. we need to parent these guys, so to speak.

i grew up watching guys like td, who was as humble as it gets, who saluted when he got a td and nothing more. never arrogant, just happy to be playing the game he loves. i watched rod smith be rod smith. i watched john elway. we had a few different players but overall, watching the broncos was a great experience as a teenager. a classy team with classy players.and you know what i did? i never danced or talked more smack than my game. i had alot of fun during practice but during my games, i worked my ass off. when i scored, i didn't sign a ball. i never pointed to the endzone after a first down. if i wanted to intimidate the defender looking at me, i didn't talk. i stared him in the eye, and when i got the handoff, i left a skid mark on his helmet, and his ass on the grass. that was what our coaches taught, too. pride, discipline and don't be an ass. you want to intimidate someone? hit them until they back down. that's football. we need to get our coaches teaching this more. it really wears on you when you're young. these players influence millions of children. i know i know, the nfl stands for the no fun league. i had fun just playing football, but you know, the nfl's been around for decades but it's only recently we took it to the excesses we have recently with the sensationalism. i was fine the way it was before, when we didn't have to justify players like terrell owens, who is the worlds biggest 13 year old boy.

right now, the nfl is hard to watch from an ethical point of view. that's really saying something. we've got players doing all kinds of crap, and kids are eating it all up.

4th Amigo
07-04-2007, 08:06 AM
maybe players do it because it's still not strict punishment. yeah, pacman got a year but really, he should've anyway. players still aren't scared. this is obvious when you go to PFT and see their "turd watch". dozens upon dozens of players, sometimes in a month no less, are in trouble with the law somehow. i wouldn't be scared, either if only about one in every ten guys actually got a real punishment. goodell needs to start crackin heads and giving out serious suspensions. you smoke pot? you fight in bars? you drive drunk? get the **** out of this league. how someone can make that much money and not act liek an adult is so foolish. the msg we're sending to kids is a complete and total joke. every kid nowadays is dancing and signing balls and wanting to be like TO or talking stupid amounts of smack like chad johnson. is it harmless? pretty much. should we be teaching our kids that this is what football's about? hell no. kick out the rotten apples and you'll start finding better fruit growing on the trees. i think alot of it has to do with immature man-boys who've never been told no, being given huge amounts of money, our on their own at 22 years old, when they're no where near as mature as someone who has lived a normal non-sports life. this leads to all the endless BS we see with young players. we need to parent these guys, so to speak.

i grew up watching guys like td, who was as humble as it gets, who saluted when he got a td and nothing more. never arrogant, just happy to be playing the game he loves. i watched rod smith be rod smith. i watched john elway. we had a few different players but overall, watching the broncos was a great experience as a teenager. a classy team with classy players.and you know what i did? i never danced or talked more smack than my game. i had alot of fun during practice but during my games, i worked my ass off. when i scored, i didn't sign a ball. i never pointed to the endzone after a first down. if i wanted to intimidate the defender looking at me, i didn't talk. i stared him in the eye, and when i got the handoff, i left a skid mark on his helmet, and his ass on the grass. that was what our coaches taught, too. pride, discipline and don't be an ass. you want to intimidate someone? hit them until they back down. that's football. we need to get our coaches teaching this more. it really wears on you when you're young. these players influence millions of children. i know i know, the nfl stands for the no fun league. i had fun just playing football, but you know, the nfl's been around for decades but it's only recently we took it to the excesses we have recently with the sensationalism. i was fine the way it was before, when we didn't have to justify players like terrell owens, who is the worlds biggest 13 year old boy.

right now, the nfl is hard to watch from an ethical point of view. that's really saying something. we've got players doing all kinds of crap, and kids are eating it all up.


Very good post. My thoughts exactly. CP to you Mr. Funk!

Cugel
07-04-2007, 08:28 AM
Probably because Godell is going out of his way to insure that in his League getting in trouble will actually get you in trouble. It probably didn't help that we had a player request permission to leave his native state to play in the Super Bowl after being indicted on weapons charges; under Godell I don't think we'll see much more of that, because if you get indicted on weapons charges you won't be playing in the Super Bowl regardless. Personally, I don't put recreational drug use in the same class as performance enhancing drugs, felony assaults and the like, but generally speaking I strongly support Godells position. The NFL shouldn't be a place where people count on ignoring the law because of their fame and fortune, and shouldn't send the message to players entering the League, "who cares if you get into a bar fight every other night and arm several small Mideast insurgencies? As long as your lawyer gets you off and you keep having 1000 yard seasons, not us". Bottom line: A professional athletes (or anyone elses) God given talent doesn't exempt them from the law, and the impression it does is something that needs to be strongly discouraged in future players, not encouraged by ignoring it. That's tacitly condoning it, which Godell refuses to do.
You speak for me too Moranbar. I totally agree!

Basically, I don't class recreational drug use with felony weapons charges, assault or accessory to murder (think Ray Lewis) but I agree that the league has to crack down on violent offenders who get off with a slap on the wrist. If you're an accessory to a murder (Ray), try to run over a meter-maid with your car because she dared to write you a ticket (Randy Moss) or pulled a gun on pedestrians during a road-rage incident (Redskins Shaun Taylor) among other incidents too numerous to name there should be consequences.

Finally, we have Pac-Man Jones who is just a walking felony:


On the morning of February 19, 2007 during the 2007 NBA All-Star Game weekend in Las Vegas, Jones is alleged to have been involved in an altercation with an exotic dancer at a local strip club. Cornelius Haynes Jr., better known as the rapper Nelly, and Jones patronized the club on the evening in question. Haynes began to shower the stage with hundreds of one-dollar bills, an act known as "making it rain". Jones then joined Haynes by throwing his own money for "visual effect". Club promoter Chris Mitchell then directed his dancers to collect the money. According to the club's co-owner, Jones become enraged when one of the dancers began taking the money without his permission. He allegedly grabbed her by her hair and slammed her head on the stage. A security guard intervened and scuffled with members of Jones' entourage of half a dozen people. Jones then allegedly threatened the guard's life.[7] During this time Mitchell and a male associate left the club with a garbage bag filled with $81,020 of Jones' money and two Breitling watches, which Police later recovered.[8] After club patrons exited following the original confrontation, the club owner says a person in Jones' entourage returned with a gun and fired into a crowd, hitting three people, including the security guard involved in the earlier skirmish. The guard was shot twice, and one of the people hit, former professional wrestler Tommy Urbanski, was paralyzed from the waist down. Jones maintains that he did not know the shooter, although the club's owner insists that Jones did. On March 26, 2007 the Las Vegas Police recommended to the city's district attorney that Jones be charged with one count of felony coercion and also a misdemeanor count of battery and a misdemeanor count of threat to life.[9]

Jones has since been indicted on two felony charges stemming from this incident and has been suspended for a year.

There should be consequences for felony convictions, just as there would be for any of us (unless you're a personal friend of the President who's been convicted of felony obstruction of justice and perjury charges after lying to a grand jury to protect the Vice-President, of course). :coffee:

We should be glad that at least the NFL is cracking down on this stuff.

aaronheeb
07-04-2007, 08:33 AM
i grew up watching guys like td, who was as humble as it gets, who saluted when he got a td and nothing more. never arrogant, just happy to be playing the game he loves. i watched rod smith be rod smith. i watched john elway. we had a few different players but overall, watching the broncos was a great experience as a teenager. a classy team with classy players.and you know what i did? i never danced or talked more smack than my game. i had alot of fun during practice but during my games, i worked my ass off. when i scored, i didn't sign a ball. i never pointed to the endzone after a first down. if i wanted to intimidate the defender looking at me, i didn't talk. i stared him in the eye, and when i got the handoff, i left a skid mark on his helmet, and his ass on the grass. that was what our coaches taught, too. pride, discipline and don't be an ass. you want to intimidate someone? hit them until they back down. that's football. we need to get our coaches teaching this more. it really wears on you when you're young. these players influence millions of children. i know i know, the nfl stands for the no fun league. i had fun just playing football, but you know, the nfl's been around for decades but it's only recently we took it to the excesses we have recently with the sensationalism. i was fine the way it was before, when we didn't have to justify players like terrell owens, who is the worlds biggest 13 year old boy.

right now, the nfl is hard to watch from an ethical point of view. that's really saying something. we've got players doing all kinds of crap, and kids are eating it all up.

I agree with you on all points mentioned, but my first thought after reading this excellent post was: "The skidmarks on the other guy will get you a 15 yard penalty now in todays game." I support Goddell in what he is doing, but the game now doesnt seem to allow for intimidation on the field. Just look at what lynch is reduced to? I dont think there is a classier guy in the NFL than lynch and a very good role model... But he so much as looks at someone the wrong way, he is fined...

Not trying to threadjack here, but this really came to mind when i read this post... The game isnt played the same as it is in high school.. Or the way it used to be played for that matter...

DenBronx
07-04-2007, 09:12 AM
you guys need to remember that most of these incidences happened before goddel became commishoner or before "he laid down the law" so to speak. so a lot of guys were trying to live like they were a mini god, never thinking about any true consequences. personaly im glad that goddel is ruling with an iron fist and it's good that he made an example out of a few. i don't think you will see so many players getting into too much trouble anymore.

NinjaPirateFunk
07-04-2007, 12:25 PM
I agree with you on all points mentioned, but my first thought after reading this excellent post was: "The skidmarks on the other guy will get you a 15 yard penalty now in todays game." I support Goddell in what he is doing, but the game now doesnt seem to allow for intimidation on the field. Just look at what lynch is reduced to? I dont think there is a classier guy in the NFL than lynch and a very good role model... But he so much as looks at someone the wrong way, he is fined...

Not trying to threadjack here, but this really came to mind when i read this post... The game isnt played the same as it is in high school.. Or the way it used to be played for that matter...
yeah sad as it is, it happens. lynch let up on a guy once when he was on the ground, getting up, and he ran for a first down or a td (i can't recall) and lynch even said to the ref, if i hit him when he's down, it's 15 yards or i'm fined. it's true, he's one of the classiest most intelligent players in pro sports yet he can't breath the wrong way without a 5 digit fine taking a chunk out of his paycheck. it's sad that reputation calls exist.