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The "nice" way is the right way....

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  • The "nice" way is the right way....

    I worked 33 years for the same company, in a management capacity (I know, who gives a hoot!), for a quality company. For the mostpart, it was a professional place, and people tended to be friendly, have a sense of humour, and exhibit comraderie...even though it was a competitive business and there were reasons to be stressed. I always thought it was cool that I would get up a bit grouchy (never enough sleep!), drive to work, and then...something magical happened. From the car to the office I would pass many people that I knew, and before too long, I was already saying "hi", smiling, exchanging some words, and basically getting energized for the day. And during the day, no matter the stress, I enjoyed the fact that we always had a moment to greet each other and try to encourage each other as well. Further, I always believed that the comraderie led to a more productive workplace. Building work friendships is conducive to helping one another when the chips are down. There are many good workplace reasons for getting along.

    Since I've retired from "professional" work, I've found the dynamics of some companies not so open to this "comraderie" stuff. One company I work for, which is quite successful, surprises me in that the relationship aspect isn't so important. In fact, some days you go in, and at least one of the supervisors doesn't even say "hello", or appears to be much more worried about their lot in life, than ours. Being that this is just a part time job, and as I describe it, for "pocket money", I really don't lose any sleep over it. But after the not so friendly beginning to the day, you drive to the other company location, and a couple of the managers there seem to suffer from some form of psychological problem......mad one moment, then a bit happy the next, then straight back you know where. These people don't take the time to get to know you, or seemingly hardly care about most of the staff. They do produce, I'll give them that, but if I was running the place, there would be a few discussions about the "team", and why it is important to take the time to make people feel important.

    Again, this doesn't bother me, because I had my days in the sun, and was part of many great teams....teams that flourished competitively, but also enjoyed one another's company. And I have had those type of experiences in other organizations I belong(ed) to. The old "work hard, play hard (and play nice)" environment. And imo, it works.

    Too bad not all companies and/or managers get that. I'm sure they would have even better results if they did.

  • #2
    i hate being nice :devil:

    but while working i try my best

    if i came into work with a great big smile on my face the others would think that something is wrong

    its just the salty way of life
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    sig by B4B6..

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    • #3
      Originally posted by saltybuggah View Post
      i hate being nice :devil:

      but while working i try my best

      if i came into work with a great big smile on my face the others would think that something is wrong

      its just the salty way of life
      Then again, there are legitimate "characters" out there that have their rightful place......you are likely one of them!!

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      • #4
        I'm very nice and outgoing to just about everybody

        but on the same token I dont mince words and come direct with people if need be ....
        :logo: :logo: :logo: :logo: :logo:

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        • #5
          I dont have the energy to be nice all the time, sometimes I'm just too tired to try to carry on a boring conversation and appear to be interested, although I do enjoy striking up random conversations with people in the elevator I've never met before, just small talk like weather or midterms. It makes it more pleasant than just standing in silence and waiting for your floor.

          Also its good never to get too serious about life and whatnot. Thats how stress and grouchiness occur.


          Just remember, "Blessed are they who can laugh at themselves, for they shall never cease to be entertained."

          A book I wrote

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          • #6
            Originally posted by LarryDean View Post
            I'm very nice and outgoing to just about everybody

            but on the same token I dont mince words and come direct with people if need be ....
            This is a great topic. I can relate.

            I worked for a company in Colorado called Ohmeda. We originated in Boulder but in need of expansion, they built a beautiful facility over looking Hwy 36 from Denver to Boulder in Louisville. (In Colorado, they call it Lewisville. We know in Kentucky it's called Loo-a-vull)

            They were bought out by BOC a British company but during my stay there it didn't matter.

            This place was fun. The friendships I got there still exist to this day and I will never forget this place for the "atmosphere" it created. I feel greatful to be part of it's success and management.

            Every June, they would have what they called "The Rights Of Spring" and we would shut down the company. Set up a carnival. Set up all kinds of games and contests. Wheel in the kegs and let lose. This by far was the coolest moral boost for everyone.

            God I miss that place.

            Originally posted by Cutler'stheMan View Post
            I dont have the energy to be nice all the time, sometimes I'm just too tired to try to carry on a boring conversation and appear to be interested
            This is a key point you will learn in college or seminars.

            You may think it's "boring" or "not interested" but the only way to keep this person in your corner is to comply with the request.

            I don't mean kiss their ass or anything but being respectful and cheerful (bad mood, bad day, whatever) is nothing but positive in future encounters. You learn to know a person and know how to respond to them during future encounters.

            I've worked professionally for over 25 years and experience teaches us the most.
            :usa: *** God Bless Our Military Men And Women*** :usa:

            sigpic

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            • #7
              Originally posted by BroncoManiac_69 View Post
              This is a great topic. I can relate.

              I worked for a company in Colorado called Ohmeda. We originated in Boulder but in need of expansion, they built a beautiful facility over looking Hwy 36 from Denver to Boulder in Louisville. (In Colorado, they call it Lewisville. We know in Kentucky it's called Loo-a-vull)

              They were bought out by BOC a British company but during my stay there it didn't matter.

              This place was fun. The friendships I got there still exist to this day and I will never forget this place for the "atmosphere" it created. I feel greatful to be part of it's success and management.

              Every June, they would have what they called "The Rights Of Spring" and we would shut down the company. Set up a carnival. Set up all kinds of games and contests. Wheel in the kegs and let lose. This by far was the coolest moral boost for everyone.

              God I miss that place.



              This is a key point you will learn in college or seminars.

              You may think it's "boring" or "not interested" but the only way to keep this person in your corner is to comply with the request.

              I don't mean kiss their ass or anything but being respectful and cheerful (bad mood, bad day, whatever) is nothing but positive in future encounters. You learn to know a person and know how to respond to them during future encounters.

              I've worked professionally for over 25 years and experience teaches us the most.
              I hear ya Maniac........I'm not professing that we should fake joy when it's not happening, on the other hand building good relations in the workplace is a huge bonus. In fact, I've been on project teams that made me jump out of bed to get to work, because I loved the project, but I enjoyed the people even more. I also had that opportunity in a couple of my jobs, when I was fortunate to lead a fabulous, tight team, while working with some amazing peers (and here's the clincher) under a great boss. Life was too good then. In fact in those days I never, ever believed we would fail.

              I've always said that I would rather work with a great group on a ordinary regular job than work with a group that wasn't that great, on a more enjoyable project.

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