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Difference between then and than

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Gatorgirl View Post
    ok so maybe that was a tad of an exaggeration.
    Hyperbole
    I really like Cheese.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by darth-hideous View Post
      Hyperbole
      good one! :thumb:

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Sparky The Sun Devil View Post
        Your right about not caring, if I wasnt gonna be tested on it, I didnt care as far as grammer goes. After the test, the grammer knowledge went out the window.

        My schools mostly stressed Reading Comprehension in english/grammer classes, but I always found it was easy to figure out the text without knowing some of the grammer rules.
        Ehhh....

        There's always wanting to make yourself look at least a little intelligent.
        sigpic
        2013 Adopted Bronco - Duke Ihenacho

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        • #49
          Originally posted by 12and4 View Post
          Who and Whom...

          people confuse them all the time.



          i remember someone who used whom incorrectly in a title, lol...


          Anyone wanna elaborate on that so people will know...

          i know when its used because it sounds natural to me by now, but i don't know the exact rules for it.


          Like for whom i would use it:

          to whom are you referring?
          "Who" is subjective - meaning "who" is the subject.

          "Whom" is objective - meaning it's the object.

          He is a subject.

          Him is an object.

          He was our third President.

          Who was our third President?

          Washington, Jefferson and Adams were presidents one of whom was our third.



          Any time "He" (or she) would work, it's who. If "Him" (or Her) works, it's whom.

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          • #50
            Ah, yes. Our wonderful language at work again! The landscape today is littered with misspelled words, horrible grammar and worse punctuation. I know that language arts is not a favorite subject of our youth, but you'd think they would have a little pride.

            It grinds my gears when I see professionally created press releases, company announcements and the like with horrible English and misspellings. I personally feel that my reputation is on the line with any document I send to someone else while representing myself and the company I work for. I understand that it's a hurry-ass world out there, but proofread for gosh sake! Why would you want a potential business partner to think you're a tool because you can't spell, use commas correctly or conjure up some decent grammar?

            Sigh.

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            • #51
              Than has an "a" and Then has a "e"

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