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  • 7 arrested in alleged SAT cheating scam

    7 arrested in alleged SAT cheating scam

    September 28th, 2011
    11:35 AM ET


    Authorities have arrested seven people in an alleged SAT cheating scam at a Long Island, New York, high school and are investigating whether the cheating extends to other schools.

    Samuel Eshaghoff, 19, of Great Neck, New York, was arrested Tuesday on felony fraud charges that could result in four years in prison if he's convicted, the Nassau County District Attorney's Office said. Six students face misdemeanor charges. Their names are not being released because they are minors.

    Samuel Eshaghoff

    Prosecutors allege Eshaghoff impersonated six Great Neck North High students between 2010 and 2011, charging between $1,500 and $2,500 to take the SAT test for them. Eshaghoff would take the test at schools other than Great Neck, where proctors would not be familiar with the students' identity, and present fake, unofficial identification, prosecutors say.

    Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice said authorities uncovered the scam after hearing rumors of cheating, comparing the test scores of suspects to their school grade-point averages, and finding a "wide gulf" in the cases of the six suspects. The district attorney's office said it is investigating possible cheating scams at two other Nassau County high schools as well as possible further instances involving Eshaghoff.

    Eshaghoff's attorney, Matin Emouna, said his client has pleaded not guilty in the case.

    And he said cheating on tests is something that should be handled in schools, not in criminal courts.

    "At what point are you going to draw the line?" Emouna asked during a phone interview with CNN Wednesday. "No one has had a case like this in the U.S., and I think attorneys are going to have a field day with it."

    The victims in the case are students who are denied admission at the colleges of their choice by students who cheated, Rice said Wednesday on CNN's "American Morning."

    "Honest kids should not be bumped out of college slots by kids who cheated," she said.

    Rice called on the Educational Testing Service, the nonprofit which administers the SAT test nationwide, to establish procedures to combat cheating, including photographing students as they take the test and attaching the picture to the answer sheet.

    "We need ETS to tighten security they have at these test centers," Rice said.

    She also called on ETS to inform colleges if cheating is suspected. ETS currently deals with suspected cheating by canceling test scores and offering refunds or retests or arbitration, according to the district attorney's office.

    “Colleges look for the best and brightest students, yet these six defendants tried to cheat the system and may have kept honest and qualified students from getting into their dream school,” Rice said in a statement Tuesday.

    Rice said authorities have no evidence implicating parents in the cheating scandal.

    Great Neck North identifies itself as a high-performing high school, with a 97% graduation rate and almost 97% of students planning to pursue higher education.

    "National publications consistently and historically have included Great Neck North High School among the top secondary schools in the country," the school says in a profile on its website.

    The mean scores achieved by Great Neck North students on SAT tests in 2010 were well above the national average, according to the profile.

    Eshaghoff, a 2010 Great Neck North graduate, tested in the 97th percentile, Rice said. He is now enrolled at Emory University in Atlanta after attending the University of Michigan for his freshman year, the prosecutor's office said.

    The next SAT test dates are this weekend and Rice said authorities would be vigilant.

    “These arrests should serve as a warning to those taking the SAT this Saturday that if you cheat, you can face serious criminal consequences," Rice said.

    http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2011/09/28...cheating-scam/

  • #2
    they probably watched that one movie... about cheating on the SATs...

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    • #3
      Originally posted by 12and4 View Post
      they probably watched that one movie... about cheating on the SATs...

      Oh, I think I've seen that one before!
      :usa: *** God Bless Our Military Men And Women*** :usa:

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      Adopted Bronco 2015 CJ Anderson

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      • #4
        Originally posted by 12and4 View Post
        they probably watched that one movie... about cheating on the SATs...

        This movie?




        Am I right or wrong?
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        • #5
          They didn't post the scores or even say if those kids got into college.

          Next it'll be he's getting sued for not cheating well enough to get a kid into college.
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          • #6
            It's amazing that one guy is so smart, and he would rather use his intelligence to break the law and make thousands... when he has the potential to be a millionaire by using his brain to start something legitimate.
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            @BlueNOrangeFTW

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            • #7
              Why would you cheat on the SAT's? You can take it as many times as you want and it isn't THAT hard.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Hoserman117 View Post
                Why would you cheat on the SAT's? You can take it as many times as you want and it isn't THAT hard.
                Agreed. Plus, who cares about them anyways...

                my high school gpa was high enough that fresno state didn't even care about it. I never reported it, lol

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 12and4 View Post
                  Agreed. Plus, who cares about them anyways...

                  my high school gpa was high enough that fresno state didn't even care about it. I never reported it, lol
                  Nice. When did you get put on probation broseph?
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                  "Maybe if he had an iron suit or a magic hammer...."

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                  • #10
                    What a dumb way to possibly ruin a great future

                    But jeez how are these high school students able to cough up $1,500-$2,500?

                    What did I do wrong!

                    Just playin
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                    Thank you Charger$

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                    • #11
                      This happens a lot actually. All the time.

                      Originally posted by BluenOrnge4Life View Post
                      It's amazing that one guy is so smart, and he would rather use his intelligence to break the law and make thousands... when he has the potential to be a millionaire by using his brain to start something legitimate.
                      Doing what? Seen the job market lately? This guy might even be smart enough to be a teacher... For a whoppin' 32k a year, no benefits, long hours, your summers spent in school yourself while everyone around you says, "But you get three months off!" and on and on...

                      Check the job market. This is a high school kid (or at least close - he's close enough that they let him take the high school SATs).

                      He doesn't play football. There are no millions for him to make. For all we know, this is how the kid pays for college himself; by taking the SAT for the other students that want to get into college and that happen to have phat stacks o' cash (3k is a lot to a high schooler) laying around.

                      Originally posted by Hoserman117 View Post
                      Why would you cheat on the SAT's? You can take it as many times as you want and it isn't THAT hard.
                      They average the scores together, and many schools will look at all the scores and if one is particularly low, it can be the reason a student is rejected even if their second test score is very high (because they obviously don't take tests well, and that's how we measure "good students" in this country).

                      Originally posted by HavoK471 View Post
                      What a dumb way to possibly ruin a great future
                      You're kidding, right? A bad SAT score stays in the system for 7 years - sometimes longer.

                      I filled out two applications last week that weren't even in the education career field that asked for a copy of my SAT scores. I'm 38! I'm an honorably discharged veteran. I've held a security clearance. I have national honors in both of my Bachelor's degrees. I scored in the top five percent for my GRE - a test taken only by the top 20% of academics in the world to begin with. I have a 3.98 in my Master's. I took that stupid SAT twenty years ago as I was getting ready to drop out of high school and they still think my score is relevant.

                      Cheating on a test in high school though? That's in your referral file at the high school and it dies when you graduate.

                      No one gives a crap that a student cheated on a test in high school.

                      They care an awful lot if the SAT score is too low, however.

                      This one's a no-brainer. The cheating happens all the time. Sometimes on accident, sometimes on purpose. The test is a sham anyway, but so much depends on the results for some students...

                      What we really ought to be looking at is:

                      A) These students cared enough about getting a shot at a good college to cheat - and to pay out the butt for it.

                      B) Why do our students - who are obviously driven and who want to go to college (thus the cheating to get in), feel they have to cheat to get a shot at college? Why do they feel compelled to cheat so that they can pass a test?

                      This test by the way, doesn't measure a damned thing in terms of what any given student can learn - it only measures what they already know; sort of.



                      The students cared enough to cheat so they could get into college. The students care, that much I think we can all accept as fact.

                      The test is a sham anyway, and people cheat on it all the damned time.

                      There's nothing wrong with these kids. There's a lot wrong with how we measure our students.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Alastor View Post
                        You're kidding, right? A bad SAT score stays in the system for 7 years - sometimes longer.

                        I filled out two applications last week that weren't even in the education career field that asked for a copy of my SAT scores. I'm 38! I took that sucker twenty years ago and they still think my score is relevant.

                        Cheating on a test in high school though? That's in your referral file at the high school and it dies when you graduate.

                        No one gives a crap that a student cheated on a test in high school.

                        They care an awful lot if the SAT score is too low, however.

                        This one's a no-brainer. The cheating happens all the time. Sometimes on accident, sometimes on purpose. The test is a sham anyway, but so much depends on the results for some students...

                        What we really ought to be looking at is:

                        A) These students cared enough about getting a shot at a good college to cheat - and to pay out the butt for it.

                        B) Why are our students - who are obviously driven and who want to go to college (thus the cheating to get in), being forced to cheat in order to past a test that by the way, doesn't measure a damned thing in terms of what any given student can learn - it only measures what they already know; sort of.



                        The students cared enough to cheat so they could get into college. The students care, that much I think we can all accept as fact.

                        The test is a sham anyway, and people cheat on it all the damned time.

                        There's nothing wrong with these kids. There's a lot wrong with how we measure our students.
                        I'm talking about the guy who was taking the test for the other kids

                        He's obviously a bright mind but this has the potential to stop where he could have gone

                        I completely agree with the bold section of your post
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                        Thank you Charger$

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by HavoK471 View Post
                          I'm talking about the guy who was taking the test for the other kids

                          He's obviously a bright mind but this has the potential to stop where he could have gone

                          I completely agree with the bold section of your post
                          Meh. They can't impact his scores, and since it's not cheating on a collegiate campus his college can't nail him. He might face some sort of misdemeanor charge for impersonation or something, but I don't know for sure. I'm not a lawyer.

                          It's an SAT. A piss poor test that isn't a government document. I doubt he'd be charged with anything at all, and like I said... They only ask about your score, not your cheating history. Even if it did though, this is America. We don't mind if you cheat. We mind if you can't take a test.

                          I doubt it has any impact on the guy taking the tests at all. If anything, it might be good for his business. I'd be surprised if he got more than a slap on the wrist, and some folks might even consider it a plus - he used his brain to make money and help others. He obviously scores very well and in our society, all we care about is the score.

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                          • #14
                            If he was really smart, he wouldn't have done as well on the tests as he did, to make it as obvious as it was to the people reviewing and comparing the scores to the G.P.A.s of the students. Sand-bag it a little to make it seem more plausible.

                            I think the pressure to do well on the test likely has more to do with the parents of these kid's that paid out for this shill test-taker. If their G.P.A.'s were that bad, they probably didn't really give a damn about their schooling to begin with, parents didn't give a crap until they started approaching graduation and saw their kid wasn't up to snuff so they go into a full court press. But if the kid gets a good SAT score and gets into college, "maybe Mom and Dad will lay off a bit and then I can go off to college with my friends and party/smoke weed/and chill." lol

                            I live in a college town. I have no idea how half of these kids ever got through high-school in the first place, let-alone get accepted to a college. It would seem that Al is right, and the way kids are measured is flawed severely.
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                            • #15
                              We should add a math section to the MCATs.... i feel i'm being judged on things that I'm not awesome at

                              i mean, reading comprehension? Hows that gonna help me?

                              *ducks away from alastors right hook*

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