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  • ebsoria
    replied
    It's been awhile since anyone, let alone me, has posted in here. But we still need to raise awareness in protecting our children.

    What's made this even sadder is the recent #metoo movement and the doubt we cast on those who are coming forward. I'm saddened to see so many being accused, but I'm proud of those who are able to find the strength to come forward. And I'm looking forward to those in the future who continue to muster the strength to come forward.

    And today we see the punishment of one of the first to be accused.

    Leave a comment:


  • Emily Diana
    replied
    -Watch: Elizabeth Smart discusses BYU Honor Code, sexual assault on 'Crime Watch Daily'-

    "Kidnapping victim Elizabeth Smart has joined the syndicated TV show "Crime Watch Daily" as a correspondent, and in her first episode discussed Brigham Young University's Honor Code and the stories of two women who reported being sexually assaulted to the Provo school.

    Smart interviewed Hailey Allen and Colleen Dietz, who both have said that the school punished them for violating aspects of the private school's Honor Code when they reported being raped.

    "It really makes me feel terrible to think that these women are not coming forward and getting the help that they not only need but deserve because they're too worried about the rules that are in place, worried that they'll get expelled," Smart said in the episode, which aired Wednesday on Fox 13." ...

    http://www.sltrib.com/news/3931800-1...sses-byu-honor

    Leave a comment:


  • listopencil
    replied
    I live in California and used the "Megan's Law" website to search my town. I have four kids, two boys and two girls. I was surprised to find three people on the list living in a trailer park across the street from our elementary school.

    Leave a comment:


  • Emily Diana
    replied
    Posted on "Erin's Law" facebook page: "This is the last week of child abuse awareness month. Please help bring awareness by sharing this video of Erin Merryn Breaking the Silence.

    Leave a comment:


  • Emily Diana
    replied
    -Teaching children in schools about sexual abuse may help them report abuse-

    "Children who are taught about preventing sexual abuse at school are more likely than others to tell an adult if they had, or were actually experiencing sexual abuse. This is according to the results of a new Cochrane review published in the Cochrane Library today. ...

    The Cochrane researchers reviewed data from 24 trials in which a total of 5,802 children took part in school-based prevention programmes in the US, Canada, China, Germany, Spain, Taiwan and Turkey. Schools involved in the trials used a variety of methods to teach children about sexual abuse, including, teaching of safety rules, body ownership, and who to tell through films, plays, songs, puppets, books and games. In children who did not receive the intervention around 4 in 1,000 children disclosed some form of sexual abuse. This contrasts with 14 in 1,000 children in the intervention groups, who disclosed some form of sexual abuse. ...

    There was little evidence to show that children experienced unnecessary worry as a result of sexual abuse prevention education, nor were there any other reported adverse effects." ...

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0416083738.htm

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  • Emily Diana
    replied
    - Eight Common Myths About Child Sexual Abuse -

    "Few people are aware of the true state of the science on child abuse. Instead, most people's beliefs have been shaped by common misconceptions and popular myths about this hidden crime. Societal acceptance of these myths assists sex offenders by silencing victims and encouraging public denial about the true nature of sexual assaults against children. The Leadership Council prepared this analysis because we believe that society as a whole benefits when the public has access to accurate information regarding child abuse and other forms of interpersonal violence.

    Myth 1: Normal-appearing, well educated, middle-class people don't molest children.

    Myth 2: People are too quick to believe an abuser is guilty, even if there is no supporting evidence.

    Myth 3: Child molesters molest indiscriminately.

    Myth 4: Children who are being abused would immediately tell their parents.

    Myth 5: Children who are being abused will show physical evidence of abuse.

    Myth 6: Hundreds of innocent men and women have been falsely accused and sent to prison for molesting children.

    Myth 7: If asked about abuse, children tend to exaggerate and are prone to making false accusations.

    Myth 8: By using repeated interviews, therapists or police can easily implant false memories and cause false accusations among children of any age.

    Each myth discussed here: http://www.leadershipcouncil.org/1/res/csa_myths.html

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  • Emily Diana
    replied
    - Ending Child Sexual Abuse -

    "Our Future Begins by Ending Child Sexual Abuse

    A world where children can grow, free from harm. Sound good? We get there when we focus on prevention of child sexual abuse. It begins with adults and communities taking responsibility for prevention, rather than placing the burden on children to protect themselves. It requires institutional leadership in breaking the silence, speaking out against abuse and adopting policies and practices that protect the children in their care.

    In supporting a mosaic of strategies to address this issue, the Ms. Foundation for Women is showing that prevention is possible, and that we each have a role to play in ending child sexual abuse. Indeed, we need not look any further than the Catholic Church and Penn State to see that this problem is bigger than any one person or organization. And that this problem requires a broad-based movement. Together, with diverse partners--from parents to activists to policymakers--we are working towards a future where women and children control every aspect of their lives and bodies, and where families, communities and institutions assume responsibility for ending child sexual abuse." ...

    http://forwomen.org/content/9/en/chi...FQkFaQodFxACJw

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  • Emily Diana
    replied
    - Rape Culture Is Real -

    "“You were drinking, what did you expect?”

    Those were the first words that I heard when I went to someone I trusted for support after my roommate’s boyfriend raped me eight years ago. When I came forward to report what happened, instead of support, many well-meaning people close to me asked me questions about what I was wearing, if I had done something to cause the assault, or if I had been drinking. These questions about my choices the night of my assault — as opposed to the choices made by my rapist — were in some ways as painful as the violent act itself. I had stumbled upon rape culture: a culture in which sexual violence is the norm and victims are blamed for their own assaults. ...

    ... I started the hashtag #RapeCultureIsWhen on Twitter hoping that it would spark a public dialogue about rape culture and shift the conversation away from the myths that shame so many survivors into silence. This conversation is meant to be a tool to educate people about what rape culture is, how to spot it, and how to combat it. ...

    The level of engagement is an illustration of how many people wanted to speak out about this issue many are too afraid to touch. The following statements are made up of contributions the #RapeCultureIsWhen hashtag as well as the myriad personal stories of survivors with the courage to speak out:

    *Rape culture is when women who come forward are questioned about what they were wearing.

    *Rape culture is when survivors who come forward are asked, “Were you drinking?”

    *Rape culture is when people say, “she was asking for it.”

    *Rape culture is when we teach women how to not get raped, instead of teaching men not to rape.

    *Rape culture is when the lyrics of Robin Thicke’s ‘Blurred Lines’ mirror the words of actual rapists and is still the number one song in the country.

    *Rape culture is when the mainstream media mourns the end of the convicted Steubenville rapists’ football careers and does not mention the young girl who was victimized.

    *Rape culture is when cyberbullies take pictures of sexual assaults and harass their victims online after the fact, which in the cases of Audrie Pott and Rehtaeh Parsons tragically ended in their suicides.

    *Rape culture is when, in 31 states, rapists can legally sue for child custody if the rape results in pregnancy.

    *Rape culture is when college campus advisers tasked with supporting the student body, shame survivors who report their rapes. (Annie Clark, a campus activist, says an administrator at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill told her when she reported her rape, “Well… Rape is like football, if you look back on the game, and you’re the quarterback, Annie… is there anything you would have done differently?”)

    *Rape culture is when colleges are more concerned with getting sued by assailants than in supporting survivors. (Or at Occidental College, where students and administrators who advocated for survivors were terrorized for speaking out against the school’s insufficient reporting procedures.)

    It’s no surprise that we would refuse to acknowledge that rape and sexual violence is the norm, not the exception. It’s no surprise because most of us would rather believe that the terrible realities we hear about aren’t real or that, at least, we can’t do anything about it. The truth is ugly. But by denying the obvious we continue to allow rapists to go unpunished and leave survivors silenced."

    http://time.com/40110/rape-culture-is-real/

    Leave a comment:


  • Emily Diana
    replied
    -Mariska Hargitay, Hilary Swank, and Other Celebs Left 'Speechless' in New PSA-

    "As Olivia Benson on "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," Mariska Hargitay is rarely at a loss for words. But in a new series of public service announcements about domestic violence and sexual assault, the 50-year-old Emmy winner shows just how hard it is for her and other celebs to talk about the difficult subject. The new series of PSAs is called "Speechless," and it strings together the unplanned, unexpected, and unscripted emotional moments that occurred while stars such as Hilary Swank and Mary J. Blige filmed the previously aired "No More" campaign. Check out the video to see the powerful end product, and tune in to "The Insider With Yahoo" on TV tonight for the latest in entertainment news."

    https://celebrity.yahoo.com/video/ma...194009844.html

    Whoa, so powerful! My heart is with them.

    Edited to add: http://nomore.org/speechless/
    Last edited by Emily Diana; 12-19-2014, 06:00 AM.

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  • Emily Diana
    replied
    -Sandusky victims’ attorney: Penn State scandal needs to be story of accountability-

    "The Penn State scandal is, at its core, a story about young boys whom an institution placed on train tracks, said Andrew Shubin, the attorney who represented nine men whom former football coach Jerry Sandusky sexually abused.

    A proverbial train ran over those boys, now in their late teens through their 50s, he said during an interview Thursday.

    “The men I represented, and I would hazard a guess almost all of the victims in this case, and maybe all victims everywhere, never felt for a minute that Jerry Sandusky would be held accountable for what he did,” he said.

    Mr. Shubin represented men identified at Sandusky’s June 2012 trial as Victims 2, 3, 7 and 10. He also represented Sandusky’s adopted son and four men whose identities have not been made public. ...

    Mr. Shubin said he decided to talk before the release of “Happy Valley,” a 100-minute documentary by director Amir Bar-Lev.

    “I think the release of the documentary really brings into focus what happened to the community and the self-reflection that the community now needs to engage in to make sure this doesn’t happen again,” he said. ...

    “As an attorney, as a parent, as an advocate for victims of abuse, I want people to know when they see something that makes them uncomfortable, when they see what could be a red flag, that nobody gets a pass. Not a coach. Not a priest. Not a rabbi. Not an educator,” Mr. Shubin said."

    http://www.post-gazette.com/news/sta...s/201411140076

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  • Emily Diana
    replied
    - Matt Sandusky Announces New Child Sex Abuse Prevention Effort -

    "When Matt Sandusky was only 8 years old, his adoptive father, former Penn State football coach Jerry Sandusky, began sexually abusing him -- a crime that he says went on for years. But because Matt had been considered a "problem child" before the Sandusky family took him in, and because Jerry Sandusky was so well-known and respected in his community, Matt says, the adults in his life completely missed or ignored the signs that he was being abused. ...

    Matt has dedicated his life to giving victims a voice. On Wednesday, he announced a new partnership between the sexual abuse awareness organization he founded, the Peaceful Hearts Foundation, and Darkness to Light, a national sexual abuse prevention nonprofit. The goal of the partnership is to raise the profile of child sexual abuse, encourage victims to come forward and train adults on how to spot abuse.

    One important part of the strategy, Sandusky said, is to encourage Congress to pass a law requiring all schools to educate children from a young age about what sexual abuse is, so they can identify it and have the words to communicate it when it happens to them." ...

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/1...n_6145498.html

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  • Sophia23
    replied
    Originally posted by ebsoria View Post
    I'd only change "victim" to "survivor". We are SURVIVORS!!!!

    Elizabeth Smart is a very strong person for what she lived through and overcame. It is true that people are most passionate about what they've experienced, that they can offer empathy or understanding to others who they see hurting from a similar situation.

    Leave a comment:


  • ebsoria
    replied
    I'd only change "victim" to "survivor". We are SURVIVORS!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Emily Diana
    replied
    -Adults should learn signs of child sexual abuse-

    "What’s being done to teach children to avoid sexual abuse, you ask?

    “Preventing child sexual abuse is a job for adults,” responds Debbie Rich, the chief executive officer of the Girls Scouts of Southern Arizona.

    Period. She’s emphatic: Our job, not the children’s.

    And that’s why the Girl Scouts is partnering with the YMCA of Southern Arizona to offer a free two-hour online class that any adult can take to learn how to prevent sexual abuse of children, how to identify it if it’s happening and how to respond responsibly. ...

    “This is different because this is for the entire community — not just for teachers or parents or cafeteria workers. It’s available to everyone,” Rich told us. “Anybody can go online, read through the program, answer the questions and get a certificate saying that they know how to prevent, recognize and react responsibly to child sexual abuse.”

    The online curriculum is the “Stewards of Children” program offered by Darkness to Light, a national anti-abuse group. There’s also a “Stewards” curriculum for groups that’s taught by certified facilitators." ...

    http://tucson.com/news/opinion/recog...1553004a2.html

    I don't hold this (Darkness to Light) group's work against child abuse above any others. I believe the more help and understanding out there, about child abuse prevention, the effects of abuse and dealing with its consequences, the better to help toward ending it. I am posting the link, in case anyone may be interested in checking it out. Take care, everyone.

    http://www.d2l.org/site/c.4dICIJOkGc...n_Training.htm

    Leave a comment:


  • Emily Diana
    replied
    -Matt Sandusky's Oprah interview is a seminar in child sexual abuse that's difficult to watch -- but we all should-

    "It is hard to watch. But just think of how much harder it was to experience.

    Matt Sandusky's interview with Oprah Winfrey, aired last night, is wrenching and disturbing and visceral in the worst ways. It is not particularly graphic. It is just difficult to view a victim of child abuse try to put words to such horrific acts.

    So, why would anyone want to watch this? That's a good question. I avoided it for most of the day, even knowing that it had made news. I just didn't want to put myself through it. It was easier not to.

    And that's why I think it might help if everyone watched it. Why, if you so choose and if you have children of an advanced enough age, you could even consider having your kids watch it.

    Because it puts a very specific description to what child sexual abuse is, how it is germinated, how victims are groomed and what the effects are. Knowing can prevent it. Just looking at Matt Sandusky's face as he struggles to find the terms to articulate his memories and emotions during various stages of his childhood with a pedophile as his adopted father is enough to bring those effects home." ...

    Part of the reason these sick people so often get away with what they do is that their acts are so repugnant that it's our natural inclination to turn away. We just don't want to know that such a thing is possible.

    But if we force ourselves to listen to someone who's gone through it, we can see more clearly how the pattern works. That could point out a predator who might otherwise go unnoticed. It could make recognizable a kid who's immersed in pain and confusion but has no one to turn to and feels no one would believe him or her anyway. It could save someone." ...

    http://www.pennlive.com/sports/index...interview.html

    Leave a comment:

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