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  • A Suggestion To New Supervisors

    I'm long past my career days as a manager. But as a part time employee and volunteer, I notice how some folks, often younger ones (but certainly not limited to), don't quite understand the art of supervising. For one thing, as per the actions of a more recent young person who has taken on a new role as our supervisor at work, it's not necessarily about saying more.....in fact, pending the staff involved, sometimes saying less is more.

    I realize that being a boss for the first time can be confusing. I too remember when I first became a manager, and how I was guessing at how to properly lead others. I tried hard to be nice, while hoping to make their jobs interesting and enjoyable. I am not sure that I quite understood the assertive part......it came in time.

    But I have noticed that a number of "green" supervisors in my post career days try too hard to make an impact, but sometimes at the expense of their group, and their customers. They can actually turn off the staff, and in the case I mentioned, the young man is walking a tight line as we speak. If he takes the time to consider how he is coming across, or listens to the feedback he is getting from some mature employees, he will be fine. Lets hope. In fact, he is turning off the young and not so young employees. Further, when he is away, we work better as a team. We probably get more done and with more concern for quality and effective management of our time.

    One day, if he decides to listen more, I'll offer some of what I learned over my many years as a boss. Saying too much, and over-directing can backfire....quickly. On the other hand, treating people respectfully, listening and thinking "we" actually works.

  • #2
    Weird you should post this as I'm about to apply for a supervisor job where I work. I've been there for longer than most people have and do the job I do well, so as it stands I'm seen as somewhat of a supervisor by the higher-powers. I relay messages from managers to my colleagues, give people stuff to do when they're done with their initial tasks etc. The only difference is that I'm not officially a supervisor and don't get paid like one! But thanks for the tips, if I get the job I'll be sure to take them on board!
    Come On You Blues! GO BRONCOS!

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    • #3
      As a new supervisor I have quickly learned it is my guys that make me look good and not the other way around. My job is to assist them in continuing and point out what they do to the bosses above.

      Sadly I have also learned I am a whipping post for those above, and below. No whining about it either.
      'cause if you do, you get reminded "that's what you are being paid for"

      At least I have beer.
      sigpic

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by EvertonBroncos View Post
        Weird you should post this as I'm about to apply for a supervisor job where I work. I've been there for longer than most people have and do the job I do well, so as it stands I'm seen as somewhat of a supervisor by the higher-powers. I relay messages from managers to my colleagues, give people stuff to do when they're done with their initial tasks etc. The only difference is that I'm not officially a supervisor and don't get paid like one! But thanks for the tips, if I get the job I'll be sure to take them on board!
        Good luck bud!

        Originally posted by EddieMac View Post
        As a new supervisor I have quickly learned it is my guys that make me look good and not the other way around. My job is to assist them in continuing and point out what they do to the bosses above.

        Sadly I have also learned I am a whipping post for those above, and below. No whining about it either.
        'cause if you do, you get reminded "that's what you are being paid for"

        At least I have beer.
        The tough part about management, is the mid management aspect........when you have extremely tough bosses who expect you to do much more with less, and then have to walk through the door that leads you to your staff, and make them feel like all is okay. PLUS.......even though you have your staff at heart, the odds are there will be one or more people that work for you directly that need to get with the program. These are the ones who will take a lot of your time, and don't really deserve much of it.

        So yes, it is a tough road......great expectations from above.....not enough staff.....one or more bad staff, who deplete your time and energy, and can bring down your entire group if not handled appropriately.

        It's all about keeping a level head, especially when the pressure is on, and dealing with issues that will get in the way of group success......and in the process, earning the respect of your good employees and those hard to please bosses.

        Not an easy job is it???

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        • #5
          Originally posted by CanDB View Post
          Good luck bud!
          Thanks my man!
          Come On You Blues! GO BRONCOS!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by CanDB View Post
            I'm long past my career days as a manager. But as a part time employee and volunteer, I notice how some folks, often younger ones (but certainly not limited to), don't quite understand the art of supervising. For one thing, as per the actions of a more recent young person who has taken on a new role as our supervisor at work, it's not necessarily about saying more.....in fact, pending the staff involved, sometimes saying less is more.

            I realize that being a boss for the first time can be confusing. I too remember when I first became a manager, and how I was guessing at how to properly lead others. I tried hard to be nice, while hoping to make their jobs interesting and enjoyable. I am not sure that I quite understood the assertive part......it came in time.

            But I have noticed that a number of "green" supervisors in my post career days try too hard to make an impact, but sometimes at the expense of their group, and their customers. They can actually turn off the staff, and in the case I mentioned, the young man is walking a tight line as we speak. If he takes the time to consider how he is coming across, or listens to the feedback he is getting from some mature employees, he will be fine. Lets hope. In fact, he is turning off the young and not so young employees. Further, when he is away, we work better as a team. We probably get more done and with more concern for quality and effective management of our time.

            One day, if he decides to listen more, I'll offer some of what I learned over my many years as a boss. Saying too much, and over-directing can backfire....quickly. On the other hand, treating people respectfully, listening and thinking "we" actually works.
            True... its a fine line between being a boss and a employee.. some mangers young and older dont realize that they dont have Manger skills until they get put to the test!! Good thread!
            sigpic

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by CanDB View Post
              Good luck bud!



              The tough part about management, is the mid management aspect........when you have extremely tough bosses who expect you to do much more with less, and then have to walk through the door that leads you to your staff, and make them feel like all is okay. PLUS.......even though you have your staff at heart, the odds are there will be one or more people that work for you directly that need to get with the program. These are the ones who will take a lot of your time, and don't really deserve much of it.

              So yes, it is a tough road......great expectations from above.....not enough staff.....one or more bad staff, who deplete your time and energy, and can bring down your entire group if not handled appropriately.

              It's all about keeping a level head, especially when the pressure is on, and dealing with issues that will get in the way of group success......and in the process, earning the respect of your good employees and those hard to please bosses.

              Not an easy job is it???
              Insert nail-on-the-head image here :thumb:
              sigpic

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by CanDB View Post
                Good luck bud!



                The tough part about management, is the mid management aspect........when you have extremely tough bosses who expect you to do much more with less, and then have to walk through the door that leads you to your staff, and make them feel like all is okay. PLUS.......even though you have your staff at heart, the odds are there will be one or more people that work for you directly that need to get with the program. These are the ones who will take a lot of your time, and don't really deserve much of it.

                So yes, it is a tough road......great expectations from above.....not enough staff.....one or more bad staff, who deplete your time and energy, and can bring down your entire group if not handled appropriately.

                It's all about keeping a level head, especially when the pressure is on, and dealing with issues that will get in the way of group success......and in the process, earning the respect of your good employees and those hard to please bosses.

                Not an easy job is it???
                I've been on both sides of the fence. Spent four years in my last FL job as a supervisor and absolutely LOVED it. The company was only four years old (I was hired the year we officially "opened") and started out on the bottom rung. Worked my way up to manager and was only two steps below the Pres/CEO when I left and moved to CO.

                The job I was hired to do in CO was also a management position and I absolutely HATED it. Same business, but the company was so corporate and all involved in the numbers and bottom line that I felt lost and under-appreciated. I had eight employees who reported to me and half of them hated me by week 2 because I put my foot down on certain rules that they got away with during the interim before a new manager was hired. I left after four months of that complete and utter disaster of a job.

                Currently am working under a 25 year old recent MBA grad who was just promoted after my boss moved back to California. The guy is smart and has a degree, but no experience whatsoever in the Medicare business and cannot lead a team of females to save his life. His mood swings are giving everyone whiplash because he is listening to the wrong people and cannot make his own decisions. We will see how long he lasts when his new boss comes to Denver this next week. I wish him luck.
                sigpic
                2014 Adopted Bronco: Juwan Thompson

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by FLBroncFan View Post
                  I've been on both sides of the fence. Spent four years in my last FL job as a supervisor and absolutely LOVED it. The company was only four years old (I was hired the year we officially "opened") and started out on the bottom rung. Worked my way up to manager and was only two steps below the Pres/CEO when I left and moved to CO.

                  The job I was hired to do in CO was also a management position and I absolutely HATED it. Same business, but the company was so corporate and all involved in the numbers and bottom line that I felt lost and under-appreciated. I had eight employees who reported to me and half of them hated me by week 2 because I put my foot down on certain rules that they got away with during the interim before a new manager was hired. I left after four months of that complete and utter disaster of a job.

                  Currently am working under a 25 year old recent MBA grad who was just promoted after my boss moved back to California. The guy is smart and has a degree, but no experience whatsoever in the Medicare business and cannot lead a team of females to save his life. His mood swings are giving everyone whiplash because he is listening to the wrong people and cannot make his own decisions. We will see how long he lasts when his new boss comes to Denver this next week. I wish him luck.
                  Some folks are born to successfully lead others.......but many of us have to learn how to manage, and a lot of it is based on trial and error. I graduated with a Commerce degree, but was nowhere near the manager I would become....many years later. And even when my career ended, I was probably still learning. Hopefully the part I understood was more the majority of the management process.

                  Of course, if you are so lucky to have really good employees, the job is so much easier. I had those times. What a breeze! They were mostly quite responsible, and fully understood what customer service, teamwork, work ethic, deadlines and budget all meant. If on the other hand you are stuck with a few weak links, your supervisory skills will be taxed.

                  I find management to be an art and a science.......and a whole lot in between. And I always felt that it was an honour to have these folks working for me. I know full well the influence a job can have, and sometimes in a very negative way, especially if you have a lousy boss. For me, it's a big responsibility being in charge of others, and if they are trying, you must do your best to make them feel good about their work, while looking for ways to maximize their talent. And just like being a parent, you must be very tactful and supportive when working with their weak spots. If done properly, employees will respect you, and do their best for you as well. That's an amazing outcome, and makes the management job so very much more enjoyable!
                  Last edited by CanDB; 07-08-2012, 12:04 PM.

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                  • #10
                    I always remember what I once heard about leadership.........a good leader is "unselfish".

                    I get that......it's not about you, but the task and the folks you have to achieve the task. It's about making it happen, without getting the glory. It's about getting folks to see the picture clearer, and become better at what they do....and feel good about themselves.

                    Unfortunately, if true, there are lot less true "leaders" out there.

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                    • #11
                      I just got out of management. I just couldn't stomach it anymore. I built successful teams and that was the fun part. The not so fun part was laying people off or sending their jobs overseas. Discipline was okay and I had no problem doing it when it was warranted. But, everything is just out of control now. I couldn't be successful no matter how hard I pushed my team because at the end of the year I was required to tell 10% of my work force they were useless, 10% they weren't doing very well, 60% they were doing good, 10% they were doing better than average and another 10% they were the bestest ever. Someone has to bite the bullet and you know once you made that call they were on there way out, not because they deserved it but because of a number. You gotta have that low performer because companies don't fire people anymore unless they absolutley have to, they prefer to just lay them off. I went from being a manager to a henchman. I went from being motivated to drive a winning team to hoping for someone to fail so that it was easier to do the deed at the end of the year. It wasn't about leadership, it was about following a plan.
                      Anybody know how to get out of Plan A? - Elway

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MegaOrange View Post
                        I just got out of management. I just couldn't stomach it anymore. I built successful teams and that was the fun part. The not so fun part was laying people off or sending their jobs overseas. Discipline was okay and I had no problem doing it when it was warranted. But, everything is just out of control now. I couldn't be successful no matter how hard I pushed my team because at the end of the year I was required to tell 10% of my work force they were useless, 10% they weren't doing very well, 60% they were doing good, 10% they were doing better than average and another 10% they were the bestest ever. Someone has to bite the bullet and you know once you made that call they were on there way out, not because they deserved it but because of a number. You gotta have that low performer because companies don't fire people anymore unless they absolutley have to, they prefer to just lay them off. I went from being a manager to a henchman. I went from being motivated to drive a winning team to hoping for someone to fail so that it was easier to do the deed at the end of the year. It wasn't about leadership, it was about following a plan.
                        Sorry to hear that......that's not a healthy environment to manage or to work in. And although it may be common in a number of companies these days, it will likely not create the best opportunities in terms of overall success.

                        Then again, it is following some unfortunate form of company direction, and strategy......which means it is kind of working according to someone. If it's driven by a weak economy, it sure gives one concern, because it is likely being handled in a similar way in too many places. Not good.....

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