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  • Frenchy180
    replied
    Thanks again everyone, I plan on picking up the book that xX-Bronco-Xx posted this upcoming Friday... I just finally got a copy of Excel on my computer, pretty smokin deal actually... Through my work I got the entire office 2013 professional suite for $9.99... I'm looking forward to my journey with it!

    Leave a comment:


  • 100%Broncoholic
    replied
    Frenchy:

    No joke. This series has helped me and others I know before.

    Leave a comment:


  • DenverBlood
    replied
    Originally posted by fightinglee View Post
    Not even sure why this is relevant. The OP said that the company uses excel, as many many other companies do as well. He is looking for help WITH excel to improve his position there, not learn every alternative to excel. In my experience, Excel is heavily used. I use it all the time for cost estimating, data sorting and evaluation, statistics modeling, etc. I have created macro based forms that employees use for all sorts of different applications. Not saying there are not other programs, but again, his company uses excel. So what was your motivation in spouting off about how much you know about other programs?
    I think it comes down to the job field.

    He is in IT. I can believe that there are probably much better more useful tools for his job field. He may not even utilize Excel in his job field. But I'm not good with IT.

    My guess is even though he assists business people all the time in his job that he doesn't really understand how we utilize the tool. And if he did he would understand how major of a role Excel plays in the success of Business management today. Like you said my company and many companies like it utilize Excel in so many ways. And you will be an extremely efficient employee the more knowledgeable you are of the tool.

    There is a reason why it is strongly advised to list Excel experience on your job resume and why Universities stress classes which teach Excel.

    Sure I agree there are other more useful tools for some job fields and business. But the basic average job function at least in the business field requires decent knowledge of Excel.

    Leave a comment:


  • fightinglee
    replied
    Originally posted by Joshua2585 View Post
    Haha, there are obviously a bunch of old Excel dogs in here... and you all kicked my butt I shouldn't have said it was useless. That's a bit harsh. It is a great tool, but it's the past. There are literally hundreds of solutions out there that are easier to learn and can do a better job. All I was saying. You are undercutting productivity by using Excel. Period. Also, someone mentioned the low cost of Excel. Wrong. When you take into consideration Linux/iOS/Windows OS and all of the potential licensing and compatibility headaches, a cloud solution is a significant improvement. I'm not saying this as an outsider, but someone who has many years of experience in advanced Excel deployments, as well as Access. I'm not talking out of my rear.

    Spend time learning your Excel. It won't hurt at all (because there are still millions of businesses across the world that use it), but do know that there are better ways to do business... and a lot of folks are starting to figure this out.

    "Plus saying that cloud based computing is the future you should read more my friend."

    Consumerization of IT is a HUGE wave that is building tremendous amounts of momentum. IT is my profession, and myself, as well as IT departments all over the world are trying to find better ways to keep our company's running at peak performance. Outsourcing certain aspects of IT is an ideal solution. Departments can purchase and deploy systems that fit their needs at 1/10th the time and 1/4th the cost of an in-house solution. Does it not make sense to deploy better and easier solutions over tools like Excel and Access that can take years to master?

    "Dont be the kind of 'hero' that comes around and start asking for app and software that wont add any value to the buisness Technology..."

    The businesses that I've mentioned have literally built million/billion dollar companies taking what Excel/Access do and doing it better. It literally is their entire business model to improve business efficiency. So, no... I wouldn't say that implementing a better business tool that would dramatically increase collaboration and efficiency, while relieving a huge burden from their IT dpt was useless. As an IT professional, I endorse and encourage folks to find secure outside solutions. There is just entirely too much out there to just sit around diddling in Excel.

    All I am saying is: explore your options
    Not even sure why this is relevant. The OP said that the company uses excel, as many many other companies do as well. He is looking for help WITH excel to improve his position there, not learn every alternative to excel. In my experience, Excel is heavily used. I use it all the time for cost estimating, data sorting and evaluation, statistics modeling, etc. I have created macro based forms that employees use for all sorts of different applications. Not saying there are not other programs, but again, his company uses excel. So what was your motivation in spouting off about how much you know about other programs?

    Leave a comment:


  • fightinglee
    replied
    Hey bud, I am sure everyone here that is helping is pretty knowledgeable. Learning Excel is not going to be hard for you at all. Don't look at it and think it's overwhelming. It's really a well laid out program. The formulas all have explanations for what you want to do. Watch that beginners video that was posted on page one and a few others from that series and then just mess around on it. Go through the formulas. Excel has provided descriptions of everything they can do.

    I could give you some specific help that would blow your employers away. What does your employer do? Is this for charts or financial analysis, statistics, data entry? I do VBA programming for excel and there are some simple things that once you learn, can turn excel into something truly remarkable. If you want more specific help, then I can leave my email address for you to contact me at. But the first thing to do is watch those basic videos so you get the gist, then you can quickly transform it into something more.

    Leave a comment:


  • Louich
    replied
    Your right on some points... Explore your options. ( But there ia a reason why all major company IE Oracle, use Excel to format and push queries to users.
    ;-)
    Im an Buisness / enterprise architect btw ;-)

    Leave a comment:


  • Joshua2585
    replied
    Haha, there are obviously a bunch of old Excel dogs in here... and you all kicked my butt I shouldn't have said it was useless. That's a bit harsh. It is a great tool, but it's the past. There are literally hundreds of solutions out there that are easier to learn and can do a better job. All I was saying. You are undercutting productivity by using Excel. Period. Also, someone mentioned the low cost of Excel. Wrong. When you take into consideration Linux/iOS/Windows OS and all of the potential licensing and compatibility headaches, a cloud solution is a significant improvement. I'm not saying this as an outsider, but someone who has many years of experience in advanced Excel deployments, as well as Access. I'm not talking out of my rear.

    Spend time learning your Excel. It won't hurt at all (because there are still millions of businesses across the world that use it), but do know that there are better ways to do business... and a lot of folks are starting to figure this out.

    "Plus saying that cloud based computing is the future you should read more my friend."

    Consumerization of IT is a HUGE wave that is building tremendous amounts of momentum. IT is my profession, and myself, as well as IT departments all over the world are trying to find better ways to keep our company's running at peak performance. Outsourcing certain aspects of IT is an ideal solution. Departments can purchase and deploy systems that fit their needs at 1/10th the time and 1/4th the cost of an in-house solution. Does it not make sense to deploy better and easier solutions over tools like Excel and Access that can take years to master?

    "Dont be the kind of 'hero' that comes around and start asking for app and software that wont add any value to the buisness Technology..."

    The businesses that I've mentioned have literally built million/billion dollar companies taking what Excel/Access do and doing it better. It literally is their entire business model to improve business efficiency. So, no... I wouldn't say that implementing a better business tool that would dramatically increase collaboration and efficiency, while relieving a huge burden from their IT dpt was useless. As an IT professional, I endorse and encourage folks to find secure outside solutions. There is just entirely too much out there to just sit around diddling in Excel.

    All I am saying is: explore your options
    Last edited by Joshua2585; 08-01-2013, 10:08 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Louich
    replied
    Originally posted by Joshua2585 View Post
    Honestly dude, Excel is a dinosaur. If you want to be a true hero in the office, here are a couple solutions that are massive improvements:

    www.trackvia.com is a Denver based customizable online DB platform. It is a cloud-based solution and can have a lot of users utilizing it at once. It is a business-user tool, so it is pretty easy to learn and is a big improvement over Excel.

    www.quickbase.com is another. This is a Intuits attempt at a database solution. They are well known for their accounting software, quickbooks. It is a bit more complicated and tends to not be as customizable as the previous suggestion, but is a decent option.

    www.caspio.com is an older solution that has a lot of pre-built templates. They have a really ugly interface, but have been around a long time.

    In the end... learning Excel is almost a waste of time nowadays (unless you are using at home for simple accounting or asset mgt and don't need a collaborative aspect). The age of cloud-based systems is upon us. If your company isn't going to spend the time and money putting together an in-house system, then they will most likely migrate to the cloud in the near future. You literally cannot run a business effectively on Microsoft Excel anymore.
    Lol....

    First of all Excell is no database, that is MS Acess your talking about...

    Second you clearly never worked in a data crunching environment to say this since Excel is the most powerful spreasheet calculator in use today. On top of being completely interoperable with most of software (to export and import data) in used today (cloud based or owned and deployed on propriety servers) Excel is no system it is a tool for the data professional of today.

    Plus saying that cloud based computing is the future you should read more my friend. There are some legal implications for buisnesses and gvts when choosing their supporting IT systems and data housing is one of the major points. I think your confusing cloud based with virtualised work environment.


    So to the OP, go and dig head first the limits to excel are essentienaly based on your knowledge of financial and mathematics formulas and principles.

    Dont be the kind of 'hero' that comes around and start asking for app and software that wont add any value to the buisness Technology...

    Leave a comment:


  • darth-hideous
    replied
    Originally posted by sbxxxiichamps View Post
    my advanced excel course in college was the hardest class id ever taken. I took away so little from it, the professor was a genius but not necessarily the best teacher.

    I mean the basics should come simple enough to pick up. But there are some fairly advanced formulas that Id recommend getting a book in order to learn. Not sure how knowledgeable your looking to become but if you want to learn how to write macros and what not then the best of luck to you lol!

    And with it anything, if you don't use it repeatedly you'll forget it.
    VB Scripting made me wanna puke.

    Leave a comment:


  • Frenchy180
    replied
    Originally posted by SBboundBRONCOS View Post
    also, look into a class at a local college maybe. Esp if your employer will help pay for it because its job related training. I found that having to do the work made it easier to learn.

    i use excel everyday and know i havent even scratched the surface of what it can do, it is a very powerful tool if you know how to use it
    When I was talking to my boss today, I told him that I wanted to learn more about excel, and he told me he'd get me into some classes for it through the company... I imagine that would be a good way of going about things, since they'll have a better idea of what exactly the company uses it for.

    Leave a comment:


  • sbxxxiichamps
    replied
    my advanced excel course in college was the hardest class id ever taken. I took away so little from it, the professor was a genius but not necessarily the best teacher.

    I mean the basics should come simple enough to pick up. But there are some fairly advanced formulas that Id recommend getting a book in order to learn. Not sure how knowledgeable your looking to become but if you want to learn how to write macros and what not then the best of luck to you lol!

    And with it anything, if you don't use it repeatedly you'll forget it.

    Leave a comment:


  • xX-Bronco-Xx
    replied
    http://www.amazon.com/Learn-Excel-Es...keywords=excel

    Might be worth the money.

    Leave a comment:


  • Frenchy180
    replied
    I want to take a moment to thank you all for your advice and help in the matter... However, please do not turn this into a "these products are better..." "no they're not" war... Thanks guys!

    Leave a comment:


  • DenverBlood
    replied
    Originally posted by Joshua2585 View Post
    Honestly dude, Excel is a dinosaur. If you want to be a true hero in the office, here are a couple solutions that are massive improvements:

    www.trackvia.com is a Denver based customizable online DB platform. It is a cloud-based solution and can have a lot of users utilizing it at once. It is a business-user tool, so it is pretty easy to learn and is a big improvement over Excel.

    www.quickbase.com is another. This is a Intuits attempt at a database solution. They are well known for their accounting software, quickbooks. It is a bit more complicated and tends to not be as customizable as the previous suggestion, but is a decent option.

    www.caspio.com is an older solution that has a lot of pre-built templates. They have a really ugly interface, but have been around a long time.

    In the end... learning Excel is almost a waste of time nowadays (unless you are using at home for simple accounting or asset mgt and don't need a collaborative aspect). The age of cloud-based systems is upon us. If your company isn't going to spend the time and money putting together an in-house system, then they will most likely migrate to the cloud in the near future. You literally cannot run a business effectively on Microsoft Excel anymore.
    This is a completely hilarious post. While yes the main money making tools of a company are not Excel it is still an extremely used product by the employees. Boeing has probably 30+ different web based tools used across programs and job fields. However every single employee still utilizes Excel in some form or another. If you don't realize this you are extremely misinformed on the uses of Excel.

    Even most of the web based tools are formed based off the Excel concept. Excel is not a dinasour and is not going anywhere. Especially when it's cost effective to have it included in Microsoft suites on all computers.



    Being knowledgable in Excel is a requirement to even be interviewed in the business industry today. Go ahead and choose to think its a dinosaur and don't become proficient at it. You'll have a hard time progressing your career.

    Leave a comment:


  • Joshua2585
    replied
    Honestly dude, Excel is a dinosaur. If you want to be a true hero in the office, here are a couple solutions that are massive improvements:

    www.trackvia.com is a Denver based customizable online DB platform. It is a cloud-based solution and can have a lot of users utilizing it at once. It is a business-user tool, so it is pretty easy to learn and is a big improvement over Excel.

    www.quickbase.com is another. This is a Intuits attempt at a database solution. They are well known for their accounting software, quickbooks. It is a bit more complicated and tends to not be as customizable as the previous suggestion, but is a decent option.

    www.caspio.com is an older solution that has a lot of pre-built templates. They have a really ugly interface, but have been around a long time.

    In the end... learning Excel is almost a waste of time nowadays (unless you are using at home for simple accounting or asset mgt and don't need a collaborative aspect). The age of cloud-based systems is upon us. If your company isn't going to spend the time and money putting together an in-house system, then they will most likely migrate to the cloud in the near future. You literally cannot run a business effectively on Microsoft Excel anymore.

    Leave a comment:

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