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70 Years Later, Remembering D-Day.

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  • 70 Years Later, Remembering D-Day.

    Don't you EVER forget these heroes.

    On June 6, 1944, more than 160,000 Allied troops landed along a 50-mile stretch of heavily-fortified French coastline, to fight Nazi Germany on the beaches of Normandy, France. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower called the operation a crusade in which, “we will accept nothing less than full victory.” More than 5,000 Ships and 13,000 aircraft supported the D-Day invasion, and by day’s end, the Allies gained a foot-hold in Continental Europe. The cost in lives on D-Day was high. More than 9,000 Allied Soldiers were killed or wounded, but their sacrifice allowed more than 100,000 Soldiers to begin the slow, hard slog across Europe, to defeat Adolph Hitler’s crack troops.


    Last edited by Peerless; 06-05-2014, 10:20 PM.

  • #2
    Thank you for doing this, Peerless.

    I saw this Wednesday. Thought it was pretty special.

    http://www.today.com/news/sweet-salu...hem-2D79756425

    There were 12 WWII veterans on this particular flight, which was headed to Paris, and at least one of them was en route to an event at Omaha Beach to recognize the 70th anniversary of D-Day. When it was announced over the PA system that he was a WWII veteran, he received a standing ovation from all the travelers.
    These vets are getting up in years. We need to thank them while we can.
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    • #3
      The BBC will be showing the services, ceremonies and parade today.
      I have such respect for this courageous generation

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      • #4
        Special day folks. It is an honour to pay tribute to those brave people.

        Comment


        • #5
          The allies really came together in an epic way. What a massive campaign Normandy was. The logistics boggle the mind. Thank goodness we had such overwhelming numbers because the enemy were dug in like Alabama Ticks.

          My favorite history campaign/battles were

          1 - Midway - awesome - just awesome
          2 - Normandy and the push east to Berlin
          3 - Iwo Jima

          A great series called Battlefield does an excellent documentary on all 3 of these historic and game changing battles.

          /salute WW2 vets
          The beatings will continue until morale improves....

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          • #6
            Utah, Omaha, Gold, Sword and Juno brought ashore by the Coast Guard plus airborne landings. 10, 000 guys seventy years ago.
            "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

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            • #7
              to each and every one of those brave men and women.
              *2011 BCMB Locker Room Division I League Champion*
              *Voted; 2013 & 2015 BCMBA's Scariest Mod*
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              • #8


                Never forget.” That seems a strange phrase to invoke on the 70th anniversary of the Allied landings on Normandy on June 6, 1944 — a phrase most of us associate with another, far more horrific episode from that war, the Holocaust.

                But on this 70th anniversary, it seems peculiarly appropriate — and not just because the number of those still living who participated in the landings is shrinking to the vanishing point. Never forget the sacrifice that was demanded of ordinary people, who performed with a heroism and courage that has ennobled the day ever since.

                Never forget why they were there, especially the more than 2,500 Americans who died, most on Omaha Beach.

                They were there because during the Thirties the Western democracies had abdicated their moral and cultural obligation to defend freedom and fight tyranny. They decided that the way to deter aggressors such as Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini and the leaders of imperial Japan was to appease rather than oppose them — or to harass them with economic sanctions, or to retreat, as the United States did, into a hopeful neutralism until it was almost too late.

                So there’s a sick and savage irony in the fact that Vladimir Putin will be there today in Normandy in celebration alongside Barack Obama and European leaders, who seem resigned to follow the same disastrous course that took 73,000 Americans dying and fighting in Normandy, alongside soldiers from eleven other countries, to help set right.

                Never forget also that the country they landed to liberate – France — had been Europe’s biggest democracy and its major military power in 1939. Then catastrophically it found itself a year later enslaved in body and spirit: overwhelmed by an enemy whose strength it had underestimated and betrayed by an intelligentsia that considered democracy and freedom frauds not worth dying for and that chose to back the stronger horses — Hitler and his ally Stalin — instead.

                Never forget the enormous risks that were taken landing 160,000 Allied soldiers and 24,000 airborne troops in Normandy, risks so great Eisenhower wrote out a letter of resignation in advance, taking the blame in case everything went wrong. If a certain German Panzer division had been parked a little closer to the beaches; or if Hitler had taken news of the attack a little more seriously a few hours earlier; or if a 1944-style Edward Snowden had decided it was his duty to leak Overlord to the Nazis, it might be remembered as one of history’s greatest blunders, instead of one of its great triumphs.

                And never forget that in 1944 we had a president who, for all his flaws, was up to the momentousness of the moment, Franklin D. Roosevelt.

                As the British philosopher Isaiah Berlin wrote after the war, Roosevelt “was ignorant, unscrupulous, and irresponsible,” but

                he was absolutely fearless . . . . He was one of the few statesmen in the 20th or any other century who seemed to have no fear at all of the future. He looked upon the future with a calm eye, as if to say, ‘Let it come, whatever it may be, it will all be grist in our great mill’ — meaning, America’s mill.

                In a despondent world . . . he believed in his own ability, as long as he was at the controls, to stem this terrible tide. He had all the character and energy and skill of the dictators, [but] he was on our side.

                Most people today don’t feel that Barack Obama is on our side.

                We sense he’s incapable of doing what Roosevelt did, of loving his country so much that he was willing to run great risks in order to advance its cause, to free others from a new Dark Age — and protect our own liberty in the process.

                Instead, today we feel those dark shadows growing. We feel as men and women of Isaiah Berlin’s generation did in the Thirties, that we are fast becoming again “a despondent world which appeared divided between wicked and fatally efficient fanatics marching to destroy, and bewildered populations on the run.”

                That’s why we should never forget D-Day. To remind us more than ever that it is possible to turn the terrible tide and for freedom to win.

                http://www.nationalreview.com/articl...-arthur-herman
                Never Forget.

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                • #9
                  Looking back, it's amazing how resilient the allied forces were in that war. Great Britain's air campaign against Germany, D Day, Midway, the defense of Stalingrad. They were all crucial to an allied victory. It's hard to believe how they were able to force the Axis powers into total defeat when it looked like a stalemate was the best case scenario for the Allies.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Peanut View Post
                    Thank you for doing this, Peerless.

                    I saw this Wednesday. Thought it was pretty special.

                    http://www.today.com/news/sweet-salu...hem-2D79756425



                    These vets are getting up in years. We need to thank them while we can.
                    Yes we do

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                    • #11
                      This is all about our allied forces, who have provided us with history to be so very proud of. They were so brave!

                      And because this was a story about an allied group, I do not mean to focus too much on my country's contribution. But if I may I'd like to add a short description of the role our canucks played, maybe small in size but big in performance:

                      John Keegan, eminent British historian who wrote Six Armies in Normandy, stated the following concerning the Canadian 3rd Division on D-Day: “At the end of the day, its forward elements stood deeper into France than those of any other division. The opposition the Canadians faced was stronger than that of any other beach save Omaha. That was an accomplishment in which the whole nation could take considerable pride.”

                      But let this not be mistaken for the fact that we did this "together" with our team of countries, who were one!!!

                      Thx for allowing me to add this small piece of information. Please add any stories or descriptions you may wish to promote. Again, I do not want to take the light off any country or person who stood for us all.

                      My thoughts go out to every single person who made this day so important! We should all feel good deep inside for the courage of our people, back in the days when history was made.
                      Last edited by CanDB; 06-06-2014, 06:29 PM.

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                      • #12
                        The Canadian contribution in WWII is often overlooked. Besides their decisive contribution on the ground in Normandy, there were the airmen like George Beurling, Russ Bannock and Vernon Woodward.

                        Troops from the Empire sustained the British war effort especially until the US entered the war. Without troops from Canada, India, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand, Britain would have lost the war.

                        "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by samparnell View Post
                          The Canadian contribution in WWII is often overlooked. Besides their decisive contribution on the ground in Normandy, there were the airmen like George Beurling, Russ Bannock and Vernon Woodward.

                          Troops from the Empire sustained the British war effort especially until the US entered the war. Without troops from Canada, India, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand, Britain would have lost the war.

                          Much appreciated Sam! It's interesting that we canucks do not make enough out of our own history.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by samparnell View Post
                            The Canadian contribution in WWII is often overlooked. Besides their decisive contribution on the ground in Normandy, there were the airmen like George Beurling, Russ Bannock and Vernon Woodward.

                            Troops from the Empire sustained the British war effort especially until the US entered the war. Without troops from Canada, India, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand, Britain would have lost the war.

                            Considering the Axis nations included Germany, Italy and Japan - along with the Germany-USSR treaty at the beginning of WW2 this is a hard point to argue. There is only so much one country can do.

                            After Germany invaded Poland on 1st September 1939 Britain were the first country to declare war on Germany, just 2 days later, and were supported by France.

                            On 22nd June 1940 France were defeated.

                            On 19th of July 1940 Hitler tried to make peace with Britain stating that he would leave our empire alone, Britain rejected this treaty.

                            For the next year until Germany invaded the USSR (22nd June, 1941) Britain, along with help from its empire, fought alone to stop Europe falling. Britain defeated the German airforce in the 'Battle of Britain', even after the blitz, and stopped their Navy from recording significant victories.

                            Britain winning the Battle of Britain meant that Germany never gained air superiority so Hitler abandoned Operation Sealion and turned his attention to the invasion of Russia, which was always his objective. Whether losing the air battle would have meant that a German invasion was inevitable is debatable but likely, although the Royal Navy was far more powerful than the German navy.

                            The 'battle of britain' was the single most important event in WW2. If Germany had defeated our air force they would have invaded Britain, victory there and command of our empire would of meant Berlin would have been capital of the world.

                            The war efforts of the USA were very important, but they entered the war 2 years after it started. If Britain fell they would of been facing a German empire that would have taken over the world and we would all probably be speaking German right now, not English

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                            • #15
                              I just lost an uncle that was on Normandy.

                              For many years he would not talk about his time in The service.

                              Finally I convinced him to at least write it down so his kids and grand kids would know of the hardships he went through.

                              After that his kids got together and sent him back to celebrate the 50th anniversary.

                              He was ever so grateful.

                              After that we spoke for hours about his time in North Africa, Italy and then Normandy on to almost Berlin when his war ended.

                              If y'all ever have the opportunity to see one of these Heroes stop shake a hand and say thanks. I do it all the time in airports to a servicemen and women I see and especially those from WWII, Korea and Nam.

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