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  • #46



    Couple shots through the Binox
    The beatings will continue until morale improves....

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    • #47
      Did anyone experience anything unusual? Any odd behavior from the pets? Anyone turn into a werewolf?
      sigpic

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Rancid View Post
        Did anyone experience anything unusual? Any odd behavior from the pets? Anyone turn into a werewolf?
        Nothing new....apparently I howl at the moon every so often...at least that's what my wife claims. But that's normal stuff. It was a non event from that perspective.

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        • #49
          I drank a beer and went to sleep, I work nights. In fact i'm at work right now, kind of surprised i'm allowed to access this site from work. What does this have to with the eclipse? Pretty much nothing.
          I really like Cheese.

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          • #50



            And who'll ever forget this (money grabbing) calamity?

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            • #51
              Viewing a total solar eclipse had been on my bucket list for some time. When I heard about the upcoming event, I chose Wyoming for viewing it, based on the proximity to my family in Denver, and the likelihood of good viewing conditions there. Initially, my focus was on Casper, Wyoming, but I settled on the small town of Glendo (population 205). Like Casper, it is on the center line of the zone of totality, and it’s a full hour’s drive time closer to Denver. I visited the town’s website, and learned that they would allow parking at the local airport, and would have both food and portable restrooms available.

              I had received a number of dire warnings about the number of people who would be traveling from Colorado to Wyoming. Based on this, I decided to leave my mother’s house at 2 am the morning of the eclipse. This proved to be a wise decision on my part. I encountered little traffic, and made the 200 mile drive in two hours and 45 minutes. As I approached the Glendo exit, I felt momentary trepidation, as there was quite a long line of cars backed up. This passed quickly, however, as I saw that there was a huge open field, and the hundreds of cars came nowhere near to filling it up. I sat back, relaxed, took a nap, and ate some of the food and water I had brought.

              As dawn broke, I could see that it was a PERFECT day, not a cloud to be seen. In addition, there was a constant cool breeze, which ventilated the car and kept things quite comfortable even sitting inside. I checked out the vendors, and watched the preparations by people with sophisticated cameras equipped with sun filters. One man from Boston was particularly enthusiastic and well prepared. I myself did not bring any special photographic equipment, as I knew that nothing I could take could possibly match the quality of the pictures taken by others. I had also read that fumbling around with a camera during the eclipse would actually detract from the experience of viewing it. Even the man from Boston said that he would only take a couple of pictures during totality, and then simply watch. My sole viewing preparation consisted of ISO certified eclipse glasses, purchased at Lowes (which was listed as a retailer selling the “real deal”) for two dollars. As the sun rose, I tested them out again (I had also done this immediately after buying them). When looking at anything but the sun, nothing could be seen, which is as it should be. Looking directly at the sun was very comfortable, and I could clearly see the sun’s disk.

              Shortly after 10 am, the man from Boston announced that the show would begin in around 15 minutes. Around 10:22, I put my glasses on, and could clearly see a small “bite” taken out of the sun in the upper right corner. Over the next hour or so, I checked the progress of the occlusion from time to time. The disk of the sun was gradually reduced to a smaller and smaller crescent. Daylight took on a diminished, eerie quality, quite unlike any cloud cover, sunset, dawn, or twilight. The anticipation mounted. Eight minutes before totality, I watched the sun continuously. As the last sliver of the sun shrank to nothing, I took the glasses off.

              What I saw was magnificent, fantastic, and awe inspiring. The disk of the sun was covered in jet black, surrounded by the blazing corona, extending hundreds of thousands of miles into space. The sky was darkened in a way unmatched by anything else. Everyone has seen a sunrise and a sunset, but what I saw was a 360 degree sunset, ie a sunset EVERYWHERE on the horizon. The crowd cheered and applauded. Eventually, Baily’s beads and the Diamond Ring began to appear, and I knew the period of totality was over.

              No cosmological event in my lifetime has ever come close to matching what I witnessed first-hand. It is a wonderful memory I will carry with me to the end of my days.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by dizzolve View Post



                Couple shots through the Binox
                That is cool. Somewhere someone posted a picture of their deck and through the leaves of a tree were bunches of little eclipses.

                Originally posted by RobertR View Post
                Viewing a total solar eclipse had been on my bucket list for some time. When I heard about the upcoming event, I chose Wyoming for viewing it, based on the proximity to my family in Denver, and the likelihood of good viewing conditions there. Initially, my focus was on Casper, Wyoming, but I settled on the small town of Glendo (population 205). Like Casper, it is on the center line of the zone of totality, and it’s a full hour’s drive time closer to Denver. I visited the town’s website, and learned that they would allow parking at the local airport, and would have both food and portable restrooms available.

                I had received a number of dire warnings about the number of people who would be traveling from Colorado to Wyoming. Based on this, I decided to leave my mother’s house at 2 am the morning of the eclipse. This proved to be a wise decision on my part. I encountered little traffic, and made the 200 mile drive in two hours and 45 minutes. As I approached the Glendo exit, I felt momentary trepidation, as there was quite a long line of cars backed up. This passed quickly, however, as I saw that there was a huge open field, and the hundreds of cars came nowhere near to filling it up. I sat back, relaxed, took a nap, and ate some of the food and water I had brought.

                As dawn broke, I could see that it was a PERFECT day, not a cloud to be seen. In addition, there was a constant cool breeze, which ventilated the car and kept things quite comfortable even sitting inside. I checked out the vendors, and watched the preparations by people with sophisticated cameras equipped with sun filters. One man from Boston was particularly enthusiastic and well prepared. I myself did not bring any special photographic equipment, as I knew that nothing I could take could possibly match the quality of the pictures taken by others. I had also read that fumbling around with a camera during the eclipse would actually detract from the experience of viewing it. Even the man from Boston said that he would only take a couple of pictures during totality, and then simply watch. My sole viewing preparation consisted of ISO certified eclipse glasses, purchased at Lowes (which was listed as a retailer selling the “real deal”) for two dollars. As the sun rose, I tested them out again (I had also done this immediately after buying them). When looking at anything but the sun, nothing could be seen, which is as it should be. Looking directly at the sun was very comfortable, and I could clearly see the sun’s disk.

                Shortly after 10 am, the man from Boston announced that the show would begin in around 15 minutes. Around 10:22, I put my glasses on, and could clearly see a small “bite” taken out of the sun in the upper right corner. Over the next hour or so, I checked the progress of the occlusion from time to time. The disk of the sun was gradually reduced to a smaller and smaller crescent. Daylight took on a diminished, eerie quality, quite unlike any cloud cover, sunset, dawn, or twilight. The anticipation mounted. Eight minutes before totality, I watched the sun continuously. As the last sliver of the sun shrank to nothing, I took the glasses off.

                What I saw was magnificent, fantastic, and awe inspiring. The disk of the sun was covered in jet black, surrounded by the blazing corona, extending hundreds of thousands of miles into space. The sky was darkened in a way unmatched by anything else. Everyone has seen a sunrise and a sunset, but what I saw was a 360 degree sunset, ie a sunset EVERYWHERE on the horizon. The crowd cheered and applauded. Eventually, Baily’s beads and the Diamond Ring began to appear, and I knew the period of totality was over.

                No cosmological event in my lifetime has ever come close to matching what I witnessed first-hand. It is a wonderful memory I will carry with me to the end of my days.
                Awesome! Thank you for sharing your experience.
                Administrator

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by Peanut View Post
                  That is cool. Somewhere someone posted a picture of their deck and through the leaves of a tree were bunches of little eclipses.



                  Awesome! Thank you for sharing your experience.
                  Wow cool. I tried to find it but couldn't. Came across this though. So cool

                  The beatings will continue until morale improves....

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by dizzolve View Post
                    Wow cool. I tried to find it but couldn't. Came across this though. So cool

                    That's cool.

                    Here's some more:

                    http://elitedaily.com/news/twitter-v...adows/2050238/

                    http://imgur.com/gallery/p7cMO

                    Still not what I saw before, but close.

                    We have a maple tree out front. Didn't see anything like that. I guess it doesn't do well on grass.
                    Administrator

                    #LupusAwareness

                    #TackleCancer

                    "a semicolon is used when an author could've chosen to end their sentence, but chose not to. The author is you and the sentence is your life ; "

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Peanut View Post



                      Awesome! Thank you for sharing your experience.
                      Thanks Peanut 😀

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                      • #56
                        We got to Arnold Nebraska on Sunday night, and the weather forecasts were calling for partly cloudy skies, but we woke up Monday morning to fog and thick cloud cover. We wondered if we should head for clearer skies, but I was afraid if we did that we might get stuck in a traffic jam. I wanted to see the entire event, not just totality. Well, we checked the forecasts and they all said that the clouds would break late morning and our friend who we were going to meet there told us that it typically starts cloudy and clears midday there, so we took a chance and stayed... and I am so glad we did! The clouds burned off and we had a great view of the entire event, from the very beginning of the Moon's transit to totality to the Moon finally clearing from the Sun! What an amazing thing to have experienced!
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