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  • A team of scientists at Los Alamos National Labs has published results of their study of COVID-19. They have found that it mutated when it arrived in Europe and that it has become the dominant strain in the global pandemic. This new strain is more contagious than the Chinese and reproduces faster in the human body. It also can reinfect someone who was previously infected and recovered.

    http://www.krqe.com/health/coronavir...ect-survivors/

    http://www.latimes.com/california/st...-than-original
    "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

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    • Originally posted by samparnell View Post
      A team of scientists at Los Alamos National Labs has published results of their study of COVID-19. They have found that it mutated when it arrived in Europe and that it has become the dominant strain in the global pandemic. This new strain is more contagious than the Chinese and reproduces faster in the human body. It also can reinfect someone who was previously infected and recovered.

      http://www.krqe.com/health/coronavir...ect-survivors/

      http://www.latimes.com/california/st...-than-original
      That is the scenario I hope is not evolving. Like swinging a golf club at a moving ball. The reinfection aspect is potentially very worrisome, pending its return strength. I suppose if it was in a weakened state it might not be as bad, but we may get false signals about "one and done".

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      • Originally posted by CanDB View Post
        That is the scenario I hope is not evolving. Like swinging a golf club at a moving ball. The reinfection aspect is potentially very worrisome, pending its return strength. I suppose if it was in a weakened state it might not be as bad, but we may get false signals about "one and done".
        The Los Alamos study casts doubt on the direction of the current vaccine efforts. They may need to refocus due to the mutations. Also, the reinfection issue puts a damper on using plasma/antibodies from recovered patients as a treatment for COVID-19 patients.
        "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

        Comment


        • Originally posted by samparnell View Post
          A team of scientists at Los Alamos National Labs has published results of their study of COVID-19. They have found that it mutated when it arrived in Europe and that it has become the dominant strain in the global pandemic. This new strain is more contagious than the Chinese and reproduces faster in the human body. It also can reinfect someone who was previously infected and recovered.

          http://www.krqe.com/health/coronavir...ect-survivors/

          http://www.latimes.com/california/st...-than-original
          I'm curious if any reinfections are as dangerous as the initial novel infection due to developed antibodies (while not immune, would the body unleash an less aggressive immune system response)? Has anyone had mild symptoms from an initial positive COVID-19 infection, tested negative, then had severe symptoms from a subsequent mutated strain?
          To infinity...and beyond.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by samparnell View Post
            The Los Alamos study casts doubt on the direction of the current vaccine efforts. They may need to refocus due to the mutations. Also, the reinfection issue puts a damper on using plasma/antibodies from recovered patients as a treatment for COVID-19 patients.
            The mutation aspect of this virus was a concern pretty much from day one. I am not a medical expert, but the thought of a moving target must be extremely complicated for those trying to find a treatment and a vaccine. Though again, I am no expert.

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            • Originally posted by CanDB View Post
              The mutation aspect of this virus was a concern pretty much from day one. I am not a medical expert, but the thought of a moving target must be extremely complicated for those trying to find a treatment and a vaccine. Though again, I am no expert.
              As far as I know, mutation is an issue with all viruses. It's a big deal with this one because it's so contagious, and has serious consequences for those who become infected with it; multiple whammy. The Los Alamos study is sobering and throws a monkey wrench at some of the optimistic estimates for a vaccine timetable.
              "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Lumiere View Post
                I'm curious if any reinfections are as dangerous as the initial novel infection due to developed antibodies (while not immune, would the body unleash an less aggressive immune system response)? Has anyone had mild symptoms from an initial positive COVID-19 infection, tested negative, then had severe symptoms from a subsequent mutated strain?
                The LA Times article has links to take you to the text of the whole report. It is an initial report of an ongoing study. It might answer some of your questions.
                "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

                Comment


                • Originally posted by samparnell View Post
                  As far as I know, mutation is an issue with all viruses. It's a big deal with this one because it's so contagious, and has serious consequences for those who become infected with it; multiple whammy. The Los Alamos study is sobering and throws a monkey wrench at some of the optimistic estimates for a vaccine timetable.
                  It would seem the most effective approach would be treatment and not vaccination.
                  sigpic
                  Thank you to my grandfather jetrazor for being a veteran of the armed forces!

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Al Wilson 4 Mayor View Post
                    It would seem the most effective approach would be treatment and not vaccination.
                    Treatment would be a gamer changer, if of course, the right "concoction" (sorry medical folks!). The whole worrisome nature of such a virus would be quickly reduced, because one has confidence that being infected is not just a wait and hope scenario. For me, if I am not a good swimmer, it's like knowing where the nearby plateau is that I can stand on.

                    I want a vaccine as my own type of insurance....again, if concocted correctly. Not for everyone I understand.
                    Last edited by CanDB; 05-06-2020, 11:35 AM.

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                    • Dang, haven't even got near the Costco toilet paper I bought about a month ago!! Lessons learned....we do not use as much as we may think, and...I am going to worry more about what is available to put into my system.

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                      • Vaccine development is focusing more on the S-protein, sometimes called the ‘spike’ protein. The S-protein is how the virus attaches to the host cell and opens the doorway. Fusion within the host cell is the next part.

                        If you can block/disable the S-protein then there is less concern with mutations. After mapping the genome of the S-protein researchers found it to be stable with multiple variations. The blueprint of the spike protein has been released to researchers everywhere in the world.

                        100+ companies are developing a vaccine. Multiple companies are now in Phase 1 with human trials. One company based in the U.S. is working for approval this fall.

                        https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-...e/art-20484859

                        https://www.livescience.com/coronavi...structure.html

                        Building immunity to the S-protein would hopefully create a vaccine not dependent on modification due to mutation.

                        Comment


                        • Interesting articles. Take this information as you see it. I am just the messenger, so be easy on me, lol.

                          ===============================
                          When the protein sequence of the SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding site was analyzed, an interesting result was found. While SARS-CoV-2 is overall more similar to bat coronaviruses, the receptor binding site was more similar to SARS-CoV.

                          https://www.thelancet.com/journals/l...251-8/fulltext

                          https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16115318/

                          Both SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV use the same host cell receptor. It also found that, for both viruses, the viral proteins used for host cell entry bind to the receptor with the same tightness (affinity).

                          https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S...showall%3Dtrue

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by johntbronco View Post
                            Interesting articles. Take this information as you see it. I am just the messenger, so be easy on me, lol.

                            ===============================
                            When the protein sequence of the SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding site was analyzed, an interesting result was found. While SARS-CoV-2 is overall more similar to bat coronaviruses, the receptor binding site was more similar to SARS-CoV.

                            https://www.thelancet.com/journals/l...251-8/fulltext

                            https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16115318/

                            Both SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV use the same host cell receptor. It also found that, for both viruses, the viral proteins used for host cell entry bind to the receptor with the same tightness (affinity).

                            https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S...showall%3Dtrue
                            Thx for this!

                            Dang those medical types....often such long reports!!!!
                            Last edited by CanDB; 05-06-2020, 12:26 PM.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by samparnell View Post
                              The LA Times article has links to take you to the text of the whole report. It is an initial report of an ongoing study. It might answer some of your questions.
                              Thanks, Sam! I combed through the full text of this Spike mutation study and couldn't find anything pertaining to the effectiveness of preexistent antibodies developed from any former COVID-19 strain, with that of any other newly mutated strain (I think the study was more pertaining to infectious/contagion metrics, but I could be wrong).

                              I did find this Live Science article, whatever it may be worth. :thumb:

                              Reassuringly, the virus is currently undergoing very small genetic changes that are "too tiny" to evade the immune systems of people who have already been infected. The genetic changes would have to be substantial enough that a person's existing antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 would no longer work against a new strain. So far, that seems unlikely.
                              Any little bit of good news...I'll take it.
                              To infinity...and beyond.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Lumiere View Post
                                Thanks, Sam! I combed through the full text of this Spike mutation study and couldn't find anything pertaining to the effectiveness of preexistent antibodies developed from any former COVID-19 strain, with that of any other newly mutated strain (I think the study was more pertaining to infectious/contagion metrics, but I could be wrong).

                                I did find this Live Science article, whatever it may be worth. :thumb:



                                Any little bit of good news...I'll take it.
                                I'll take any good news!

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