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6.5 Earthquake hits Meridian

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  • #16
    Originally posted by jazzbodog View Post
    I live in SLC and it was my first ever experience with an earth quake. I was watching TV in our great room and everything started shaking for 2-3 seconds and I was very confused and didn't understand what was happening until my wife screamed from the bedroom....EARTH QUAKE!

    It's amazing how quickly so many thinks zip through your brain in 1 or 2 seconds like...strong micro-burst, did a UPS/Fed X truck hit our house, near by gas leak explosion or plane crash? A few seconds of frighting confusion. Then we wondered....are after shocks or an even bigger earth quake imminent, should we go outside? WOW!
    If I remember correctly, do not go outside. Especially where there are tall buildings. Getting hit by debris is a concern. Stay away from windows. Be under a doorway or sturdy desk/table (I think).

    Hopefully, you'll never need this information.

    Al, glad you're okay. My experience has always been in a one story house. Not as scary as being in a tall building. I do appreciate your humor -- it being "entertaining".
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    • #17
      Originally posted by Peanut View Post
      If I remember correctly, do not go outside. Especially where there are tall buildings. Getting hit by debris is a concern. Stay away from windows. Be under a doorway or sturdy desk/table (I think).

      Hopefully, you'll never need this information.

      Al, glad you're okay. My experience has always been in a one story house. Not as scary as being in a tall building. I do appreciate your humor -- it being "entertaining".
      That's true! Just some general earthquake safety info from a past life spent in Southern California:

      Take the opportunity during non-shaking angry plate movement, to identify sturdy pieces of furniture in any given room of the house. Wherever you may be, know what and where to dive under, and crouch on your knees, placing your hands over the back of your neck, and keep your head down.

      If there is absolutely nothing to hide under, stand under a doorway and away from any windows if possible.

      Once shaking stops, smell for gas, if you smell gas, leave the premises immediately, it could be a broken gas line. If you can safely do so, shut your gas off outside at the meter, otherwise, don't risk your life. Be aware, there could be broken glass on the ground, keep in mind if barefoot.

      Always good to have spare water and supplies (and even water purification items) just in case of an emergency. Better to be safe than sorry.
      To infinity...and beyond.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Lumiere View Post
        That's true! Just some general earthquake safety info from a past life spent in Southern California:

        Take the opportunity during non-shaking angry plate movement, to identify sturdy pieces of furniture in any given room of the house. Wherever you may be, know what and where to dive under, and crouch on your knees, placing your hands over the back of your neck, and keep your head down.

        If there is absolutely nothing to hide under, stand under a doorway and away from any windows if possible.

        Once shaking stops, smell for gas, if you smell gas, leave the premises immediately, it could be a broken gas line. If you can safely do so, shut your gas off outside at the meter, otherwise, don't risk your life. Be aware, there could be broken glass on the ground, keep in mind if barefoot.

        Always good to have spare water and supplies (and even water purification items) just in case of an emergency. Better to be safe than sorry.
        Thank you for the added information. I knew living in CA came with some unique education.
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        • #19
          Originally posted by Lumiere View Post
          Once shaking stops, smell for gas, if you smell gas, leave the premises immediately, it could be a broken gas line. If you can safely do so, shut your gas off outside at the meter, otherwise, don't risk your life. Be aware, there could be broken glass on the ground, keep in mind if barefoot.
          ^ This is super important.

          I lived in the SF Bay Area from 1960 to 2013 so experienced quite a few. The biggest of course was the Loma Prieta 1989 quake that occurred right before game 3 of the Giants - A's world series; collapsing freeways and damaging the bay bridge in SF etc... I was living in San Jose which was about 30 miles from the epicenter and as soon as I got home my wife and I thought we smelled gas so I shut it off. It took PGE 3 or 4 days to come out and inspect to make sure everything was ok. In many cases, the damage caused by the earthquake takes 2nd place to the damage caused by fire and explosions due to broken gas lines.

          There was a funny thing that happened that day due to the quake. We had a large 12 x 24 ft above ground pool and when I finally got home noticed the driveway was completely soaking wet. I thought this totally bizarre because the day was the usual mid October San Jose weather, hot and dry. I get back to look at the pool for damage and it was only a quarter full! My neighbor told me he was looking at my pool during the quake and it was like one of those artificial wave machines...the water was pounding back and forth and splashing over the side. Wish I could have seen that
          "There is no plan B. Plan A is to win the Super Bowl" - John Elway
          PLAN A ACCOMPLISHED 2/7/16!!!
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          • #20
            Originally posted by Lumiere View Post
            That's true! Just some general earthquake safety info from a past life spent in Southern California:

            Take the opportunity during non-shaking angry plate movement, to identify sturdy pieces of furniture in any given room of the house. Wherever you may be, know what and where to dive under, and crouch on your knees, placing your hands over the back of your neck, and keep your head down.

            If there is absolutely nothing to hide under, stand under a doorway and away from any windows if possible.

            Once shaking stops, smell for gas, if you smell gas, leave the premises immediately, it could be a broken gas line. If you can safely do so, shut your gas off outside at the meter, otherwise, don't risk your life. Be aware, there could be broken glass on the ground, keep in mind if barefoot.

            Always good to have spare water and supplies (and even water purification items) just in case of an emergency. Better to be safe than sorry.
            Good advice!

            Originally posted by Dennis.1960 View Post
            ^ This is super important.

            I lived in the SF Bay Area from 1960 to 2013 so experienced quite a few. The biggest of course was the Loma Prieta 1989 quake that occurred right before game 3 of the Giants - A's world series; collapsing freeways and damaging the bay bridge in SF etc... I was living in San Jose which was about 30 miles from the epicenter and as soon as I got home my wife and I thought we smelled gas so I shut it off. It took PGE 3 or 4 days to come out and inspect to make sure everything was ok. In many cases, the damage caused by the earthquake takes 2nd place to the damage caused by fire and explosions due to broken gas lines.

            There was a funny thing that happened that day due to the quake. We had a large 12 x 24 ft above ground pool and when I finally got home noticed the driveway was completely soaking wet. I thought this totally bizarre because the day was the usual mid October San Jose weather, hot and dry. I get back to look at the pool for damage and it was only a quarter full! My neighbor told me he was looking at my pool during the quake and it was like one of those artificial wave machines...the water was pounding back and forth and splashing over the side. Wish I could have seen that
            That is scary stuff!

            Still remember that WS game and all the fear. And chunks of bridge that were seriously damaged, never mind the folks who were impacted.

            Two small earthquakes is all I ever want to have experienced!

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            • #21
              Originally posted by CanDB View Post
              Good advice!

              That is scary stuff!

              Still remember that WS game and all the fear. And chunks of bridge that were seriously damaged, never mind the folks who were impacted.
              Here's what was even scarier. I was at work when it happened and right after the power went out and everyone headed for their cars to get home asap. I decided to sit it out awhile and wait for everyone to clear out and the traffic to slow down...big mistake. Anyway, I finally jumped in my car and turned on the radio to get some news and info...all the radio stations were static, no one was on the air! That's when I knew this was very serious. I finally found the NPR station and they were on and announcing that the bay bridge had collapsed. I had visions of the entire bridge going down and everyone on it drowning in the bay. Luckily it wasn't that serious but there was a lot of bad intel being broadcast. My wife was working on the 14th floor of a high rise in downtown San Jose and I had no way of knowing what happened so I just headed for home. Luckily she was there and safe. She told me the building was swaying back and forth during the quake (I guess that's how they build them to survive this kind of disaster) and after everyone had to use the stairways to get out and there was no light...all the building power had gone out. Crazy day for sure
              "There is no plan B. Plan A is to win the Super Bowl" - John Elway
              PLAN A ACCOMPLISHED 2/7/16!!!
              LSU 15-0 2019 BCS Champions...Geaux Tigers :dance:

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              • #22
                Felt it out here in BC.
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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Peanut View Post
                  If I remember correctly, do not go outside. Especially where there are tall buildings. Getting hit by debris is a concern. Stay away from windows. Be under a doorway or sturdy desk/table (I think).

                  Hopefully, you'll never need this information.

                  Al, glad you're okay. My experience has always been in a one story house. Not as scary as being in a tall building. I do appreciate your humor -- it being "entertaining".
                  True but we live in a neighborhood where there's only 1-2 story homes and no buildings anywhere close other than one story businesses in strip malls. My wife and I discussed what to do if / when it happens again and decided that heading outside (if possible) would be safer and you're 100% correct about staying away from windows and quickly get under a doorway or sturdy desk/table.
                  Utah Bronco Freak

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Dennis.1960 View Post
                    Here's what was even scarier. I was at work when it happened and right after the power went out and everyone headed for their cars to get home asap. I decided to sit it out awhile and wait for everyone to clear out and the traffic to slow down...big mistake. Anyway, I finally jumped in my car and turned on the radio to get some news and info...all the radio stations were static, no one was on the air! That's when I knew this was very serious. I finally found the NPR station and they were on and announcing that the bay bridge had collapsed. I had visions of the entire bridge going down and everyone on it drowning in the bay. Luckily it wasn't that serious but there was a lot of bad intel being broadcast. My wife was working on the 14th floor of a high rise in downtown San Jose and I had no way of knowing what happened so I just headed for home. Luckily she was there and safe. She told me the building was swaying back and forth during the quake (I guess that's how they build them to survive this kind of disaster) and after everyone had to use the stairways to get out and there was no light...all the building power had gone out. Crazy day for sure
                    That must have been terrible!! I have just felt small rumbling and perhaps some movement, and that was enough! But when I found out about the quake, I started to worry a bit about after shocks.

                    But wow...how awful that must have been for you folks!!!

                    The buildings in some cities clearly know something about the type of structure required. But last time I was in SF, they were talking about a really tall building being built. I can not imagine being high up (or anywhere) within a building with a major quake, no matter the structure!

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by EddieMac View Post
                      Felt it out here in BC.
                      You felt the one from yesterday?
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                      Thank you to my grandfather jetrazor for being a veteran of the armed forces!

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                      • #26
                        We had a weird string of earthquakes yesterday night. Nothing like the 6.5 in Idaho but they were strong enough to get your heart thumping and make you wonder.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Rastic View Post
                          We had a weird string of earthquakes yesterday night. Nothing like the 6.5 in Idaho but they were strong enough to get your heart thumping and make you wonder.
                          I was on the second floor of a 5 story building. 5 minutes after it ended I could still fill the building swaying.
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                          Thank you to my grandfather jetrazor for being a veteran of the armed forces!

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                          • #28
                            Meridian as in Mississippi? I didn’t feel anything down here in Gulfport

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Al Wilson 4 Mayor View Post
                              You felt the one from yesterday?
                              The one you mentioned in the original post..

                              https://www.castlegarnews.com/news/6...-b-c-interior/
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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by EddieMac View Post
                                The one you mentioned in the original post..

                                https://www.castlegarnews.com/news/6...-b-c-interior/
                                Yep thats the one, wow. When it started my cubicle was jolting hard & I thought someone was messing with me. Even 10 minutes after it ended I could still feel the building swaying.

                                Fun fact: my went to Bible college in Surrey.
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                                Thank you to my grandfather jetrazor for being a veteran of the armed forces!

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