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  • #16
    Originally posted by PAINTERDAVE
    You got that right, BBJ!

    Another time, another place, another war...

    One of my best friends from High School, his older brother was almost through his stint in NAM, back in about 1971-1972. He had 4 days to go, and then (as the said) he would go back to the world. Dude stepped on a land mine. Blew him to smithereens. He never got back to the world. His little Brother, my bud, has never quite gotten over it. Dude has never seen "Saving Private Ryan" or an other war movie, my bud can not bring himself to view 'em. Life is funny. Funny strange, not humorous.


    A good portion of life involves pain...learning how to deal with it and move on is the basis of survival...
    I've walked these streets, a loaded six-string on my back, I play for keeps 'cause I might not make it back, I've been everywhere still I'm standin' tall, I've seen a million faces and I've rocked them all!!:salute!:

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Big Bad John

      A good portion of life involves pain...learning how to deal with it and move on is the basis of survival...
      YABA...............
      - Go Broncos 2017 and Beyond! -

      Super Bowl 50 CHAMPIONS!

      Comment


      • #18
        hey

        My friend, Don, loves the Broncos. He has 2 leather Bronco jackets signed by Elway himself. A bit older than me, Don and his crew goes out to the dog track, and they are some damn good handicappers, often pulling in some pretty sweet winnings. Everybody loves Don. I get together with him like twice a month, shoot the breeze. He keeps telling me he's gonna take me out to the track, and teach me a thing or two about betting the puppies. I work so often, I always put him off. I wish now I had taken him up on his offer.

        Yesterday, Don died.

        Heart surgery, infectious complications, a few trips back to the hospital. Dude should have had another 20 years. His wound/scar/whatever it is called didn't heal right. His wife came upstairs, he said "I'm bleeding" She told me she thought she might have to change the dressing. There sat Don on the couch, in a pool of blood. 9-11. Dude bled out by the time he was out the door! tragic despair and misery!

        Don was a Broncomaniac.
        - Go Broncos 2017 and Beyond! -

        Super Bowl 50 CHAMPIONS!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by PAINTERDAVE
          My friend, Don, loves the Broncos. He has 2 leather Bronco jackets signed by Elway himself. A bit older than me, Don and his crew goes out to the dog track, and they are some damn good handicappers, often pulling in some pretty sweet winnings. Everybody loves Don. I get together with him like twice a month, shoot the breeze. He keeps telling me he's gonna take me out to the track, and teach me a thing or two about betting the puppies. I work so often, I always put him off. I wish now I had taken him up on his offer.

          Yesterday, Don died.

          Heart surgery, infectious complications, a few trips back to the hospital. Dude should have had another 20 years. His wound/scar/whatever it is called didn't heal right. His wife came upstairs, he said "I'm bleeding" She told me she thought she might have to change the dressing. There sat Don on the couch, in a pool of blood. 9-11. Dude bled out by the time he was out the door! tragic despair and misery!

          Don was a Broncomaniac.
          Dam Dave! Theyre comin at ya in waves!

          Sorry to hear about Don. The loss af another Bronco fan is always a sad thing.............

          Incidently, was the large obit about the 17 year old girl hitting the tree on University your first post? I saw it in the R M News.

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          • #20
            yaba

            That was the ill fated twin!
            - Go Broncos 2017 and Beyond! -

            Super Bowl 50 CHAMPIONS!

            Comment


            • #21
              Joe Delaney

              I never knew the guy. Perhaps you've heard of him. I pulled this story, by Charles E. Bryce, out of Tomorrow's World magazine. I will retype it here:


              Running back Joe Delaney joined the Kansas City Chiefs football team as a rookie in the summer of 1981, and was immediately on his way to becoming a superstar. He set a single-season rushing record for his team, won Rookie of the Year honors and earned a starting position for the American Football Conference team at the Pro Bowl—the first time a running back from the Chiefs had ever done so. After the strike-shortened 1982 season, Joe was looking forward to the start of the Chiefs’ training camp in July 1983.

              On a sunny Wednesday afternoon, June 29, 1983, Joe was enjoying a relaxing afternoon at a park in Monroe, Louisiana. Suddenly, he was startled by a noise nearby. Hearing frantic cries for help, Joe saw that three young boys had climbed into a nearby pit filled with water, unaware that it dropped to a 20-foot depth not far from the edge. There were many other people in the park that day, but not one of them jumped into the water to come to the boys’ rescue. Only Joe Delaney did. Without hesitating or breaking stride, he dove headlong into the water to try to save three young children he did not even know.

              Through sheer strength, he was able to pull one boy back to the edge of the pit, saving his life. Then—to the amazement of onlookers—he dove under the water to try to grab the other two boys. But none of them returned to the surface. Joe Delaney could not swim!

              Why did he do this? Where did the character come from that prompted this energetic young 24-year-old, with a great future yet ahead of him, to lay down his life for complete strangers? Such heroic action can only flow from character, carefully built and strengthened over the long haul. In the process of building character, the little things mean a lot. In fact, they form the foundation of character development in every human life.

              Joe Delaney was rich and famous, yet he would still mow lawns and visit the elderly when he went home to Haughton, Louisiana in the off-season, and would pass out shoes and clothes on the street to children whom he had never met. These quiet and relatively unnoticed acts of kindness and concern for others helped to build the legacy of character that was taking root in Joe Delaney’s life. Doing the right thing was obviously a big part of his innermost being. Doing the right thing, no matter what the cost, was first and second nature to him.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by topscribe
                I never knew the guy. Perhaps you've heard of him. I pulled this story, by Charles E. Bryce, out of Tomorrow's World magazine. I will retype it here:


                Running back Joe Delaney joined the Kansas City Chiefs football team as a rookie in the summer of 1981, and was immediately on his way to becoming a superstar. He set a single-season rushing record for his team, won Rookie of the Year honors and earned a starting position for the American Football Conference team at the Pro Bowl—the first time a running back from the Chiefs had ever done so. After the strike-shortened 1982 season, Joe was looking forward to the start of the Chiefs’ training camp in July 1983.

                On a sunny Wednesday afternoon, June 29, 1983, Joe was enjoying a relaxing afternoon at a park in Monroe, Louisiana. Suddenly, he was startled by a noise nearby. Hearing frantic cries for help, Joe saw that three young boys had climbed into a nearby pit filled with water, unaware that it dropped to a 20-foot depth not far from the edge. There were many other people in the park that day, but not one of them jumped into the water to come to the boys’ rescue. Only Joe Delaney did. Without hesitating or breaking stride, he dove headlong into the water to try to save three young children he did not even know.

                Through sheer strength, he was able to pull one boy back to the edge of the pit, saving his life. Then—to the amazement of onlookers—he dove under the water to try to grab the other two boys. But none of them returned to the surface. Joe Delaney could not swim!

                Why did he do this? Where did the character come from that prompted this energetic young 24-year-old, with a great future yet ahead of him, to lay down his life for complete strangers? Such heroic action can only flow from character, carefully built and strengthened over the long haul. In the process of building character, the little things mean a lot. In fact, they form the foundation of character development in every human life.

                Joe Delaney was rich and famous, yet he would still mow lawns and visit the elderly when he went home to Haughton, Louisiana in the off-season, and would pass out shoes and clothes on the street to children whom he had never met. These quiet and relatively unnoticed acts of kindness and concern for others helped to build the legacy of character that was taking root in Joe Delaney’s life. Doing the right thing was obviously a big part of his innermost being. Doing the right thing, no matter what the cost, was first and second nature to him.
                What a man.....what a man............

                sigpic

                Sig made by me. Click top sig to view my Graphics Portfolio.

                There are three things you can expect in life:

                1. Death
                2. Taxes
                3. The Ball Being Picked Off by Champ Bailey

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                • #23
                  A couple

                  My grandmother's late husband (not my grandfather, but we called him "Grandpa Pete").
                  Anyway, about 15 years ago he was driving home on a rural street outside of Twentynine Palms, CA and was killed in a head-on collision with a Marine who was under the influence of Alcohol.

                  My great uncle Maurice.
                  He was an owner of a grocery store in Clarendon, Jamaica who refused to pay protection $$$ to some local gang and was murdered last weekend as a result. He was planning on moving to the states this summer too...™
                  This space for rent

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by urinal_cake
                    My grandmother's late husband (not my grandfather, but we called him "Grandpa Pete").
                    Anyway, about 15 years ago he was driving home on a rural street outside of Twentynine Palms, CA and was killed in a head-on collision with a Marine who was under the influence of Alcohol.

                    My great uncle Maurice.
                    He was an owner of a grocery store in Clarendon, Jamaica who refused to pay protection $$$ to some local gang and was murdered last weekend as a result. He was planning on moving to the states this summer too...™
                    Man, that's tough. Sorry to hear that, UC.

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                    • #25
                      hey

                      Sorry to hear that about yer uncle!

                      Life is a trial, is it not?
                      - Go Broncos 2017 and Beyond! -

                      Super Bowl 50 CHAMPIONS!

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Brian Jones, one of my best friends, he was a friend to everyone and was always the first to volunteer to help anyone out any way he can. Money was a material object that he did mind sharing at all. He took care of his mom and younger siblings (who were all minors). He helped family & friends with bills no questions asked.
                        Brian was the life of the party...he was the party. he loved to cook, and he loved to drink. He left the Red Dog Mine exactly 5 years ago tomorrow and I was to arrive on the 6th of June. Our plans were he was gonna meet me at one of the bars in the airport and we were gonna have a few drink and hit the town. Brian was drinking downtown and he left with some friends and they were driving and told them to go back, he had to bring his uncles truck back to him. They refused and he got angry and made them go back. They brought him back and while he was driving, it's believed he passed out behind the wheel and ran a red light and t-boned a car. He wasn't buckled in and was thrown from the truck, the truck he was driving flipped over and landed on him killing him instantly. The next morning I was at work and a guy came up to me and asked if I heard about Brian. I knew instantly it was bad news, he said he died early this morning. I knew there was another Brian Jones and tried to convince myself it was this other Brian that died. I made a call and found out it was my bra Brian.
                        When I got to town two days later my mom & bro meet me at the airport and we left, later I remembered I was suposed to meet him in the bar and have a drink with him. I often wonder if he was a wondering sprit waiting for me at the bar and I didn't show up.
                        I used to drink & drive before that and never though anything of it, but to this day I won't get behind the wheel if I've been drinking. Once & a while me and my buddy Pat will by Old Millwakee's Best Ice, and drink to our pal Brian.

                        Nearly 6 years & 2 weeks ago, my grandpa Doug Sheldon, my favorite man in the world, was lost at sea, while hunting for bearded seals, with another old man from our town. He was a pilot and I'd go flying with him and my grandma and get air sick everytime, but I'd never let them leave me behind. He stopped flying when I was a young kid after he had eye surgery. There are many other stories I'd like to share, but I won't...I'll just say he's the reason I'm the man I am today.


                        The earth is but one country and mankind it's citizens
                        Baha'u'llah

                        "Everyone takes turns making mistakes in poker. The trick is to skip your turn."
                        Mike Caro

                        "The all-in play works every time but once"


                        You can observe a lot just by watching.
                        Yogi Berra

                        every year.

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                        • #27
                          hey

                          Uula Bear!

                          Thank you for telling us.

                          Yer Pal - PAINTER
                          - Go Broncos 2017 and Beyond! -

                          Super Bowl 50 CHAMPIONS!

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                          • #28
                            My great aunt. She was one of the best farmers in the area. She didn't care about who slept at her house, but aslong as you needed a plce to rest. She would let you. And boy oh boy, did she make the best spaghetti sauce. She would cook a big batch every Sunday (nearly 30 gallons worth), and it was gone by Friday. I never tried it, until one week before her death. I felt so bad, that I would never taste that good sauce ever again.
                            sigpic

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