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Autism Spectrum Disorders/PDD

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  • keithbishop
    replied
    May God Bless you and your family, Med.

    Leave a comment:


  • AZ Snake Fan
    replied
    Originally posted by Medford Bronco
    great post Jaws, it is nice to hear that Moc is doing well!

    It is also nice to make people aware of autism and how it affected all different kinds of people.


    --- While I was driving this morning, on my way to work, ESPN Radio did a PSA about autism ---

    --- Some of you may have heard it ---

    --- The Public Service Announcement was short but effective:



    --- "One out of 15,000 children have a chance to become a good athlete,

    --- One out of 166 children have a chance to be affected by autism."



    --- In this case, the autistic awareness campaign targets the sports radio market, using an athletic analogy ---

    --- I remembered it !

    ---

    .

    Leave a comment:


  • Medford Bronco
    replied
    Originally posted by Jaws
    Here's the article from the newspaper on the tv documentary I mentioned in the cafe earlier Med:


    When singer Caryl Parry Jones’ son Morgan stopped talking at two and a half years old there seemed to be plenty of reasons why.

    His mum had just given birth to his little sister Greta, then she was seriously ill and had to go into hospital, he’d started nursery school, he was at a difficult age.
    But when he was still mute a year and a half later alarm bells began to sound.
    “The psychologist put it down to the trauma of these events all at once. But a year later I was beginning to think he should hve got over it by now,” admits Caryl.

    In fact Morgan, known as Moc, has autism and it was another eight years before he was finally diagnosed,

    “It was a very painful time for us when he couldn’t talk and then when he began again it was a big game of catch-up” says Caryl.

    “When we finally found out what was wrong it was bad news but good news because everyone then had a handbook to refer to.

    “I don’t like to say he suffers from and illness, because he doesn’t suffer. He’s a good artist, has perfect pitch and a great sense of humour.

    “He also has a lovely group of friends and is very sociable.”
    Caryl and Moc, now 13 are featured in “Dau fab Dau Lwybr” (Two sons two paths) broadcast during Welsh language channel S4C’s appeal week in aid of Autism Cymru.

    It’s estimated that 20,000 children and adults in Wales who have varying degrees of autism, a lifelong condition and Caryl hopes that the appeal will help raise awareness,

    Her son has been branded difficult and lazy by people unaware that he is autistic and even getting the diagnosis was a struggle.

    “At times I felt as if I was a hopeless parent although, luckily as I had two children already I knew I wasn’t”

    “And you stop thinking about yourself because you are so worried about this tortured being that you cherish so much.”

    The future looks bright though for Moc, thanks to excellent help from his school and the support of his three sisters and Caryl and her husband, musician Myfyr Isaac.

    Today Moc is in mainstream school and will take his GCSE’s, with a little bit of one-to-one help, along with his classmates.

    Things are not so straightforward though for the Gillibrand family who are also featured in the documentary.

    The Reverend John Gillibrand is an Anglican priest in Carmarthenshire and their eldest son, 13-year old Adam has severe autism which means 24/7 care. The Gillibrands admit that they’ve had some tough times.

    “I choose my words carefully, but we as a family have been through hell at times,” says John Gillibrand. We’ve had to battle to get what Adam deserves and needs”

    “ We have experienced discrimination too, with people confronting us and asking, “Can’t you control that boy?”

    As Caryl says, “I hope the documentary will make people aware of what autism means and people will understand more and be less likely to judge.”
    great post Jaws, it is nice to hear that Moc is doing well!

    It is also nice to make people aware of autism and how it affected all different kinds of people.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jaws
    replied
    Here's the article from the newspaper on the tv documentary I mentioned in the cafe earlier Med:


    When singer Caryl Parry Jones’ son Morgan stopped talking at two and a half years old there seemed to be plenty of reasons why.

    His mum had just given birth to his little sister Greta, then she was seriously ill and had to go into hospital, he’d started nursery school, he was at a difficult age.
    But when he was still mute a year and a half later alarm bells began to sound.
    “The psychologist put it down to the trauma of these events all at once. But a year later I was beginning to think he should hve got over it by now,” admits Caryl.

    In fact Morgan, known as Moc, has autism and it was another eight years before he was finally diagnosed,

    “It was a very painful time for us when he couldn’t talk and then when he began again it was a big game of catch-up” says Caryl.

    “When we finally found out what was wrong it was bad news but good news because everyone then had a handbook to refer to.

    “I don’t like to say he suffers from and illness, because he doesn’t suffer. He’s a good artist, has perfect pitch and a great sense of humour.

    “He also has a lovely group of friends and is very sociable.”
    Caryl and Moc, now 13 are featured in “Dau fab Dau Lwybr” (Two sons two paths) broadcast during Welsh language channel S4C’s appeal week in aid of Autism Cymru.

    It’s estimated that 20,000 children and adults in Wales who have varying degrees of autism, a lifelong condition and Caryl hopes that the appeal will help raise awareness,

    Her son has been branded difficult and lazy by people unaware that he is autistic and even getting the diagnosis was a struggle.

    “At times I felt as if I was a hopeless parent although, luckily as I had two children already I knew I wasn’t”

    “And you stop thinking about yourself because you are so worried about this tortured being that you cherish so much.”

    The future looks bright though for Moc, thanks to excellent help from his school and the support of his three sisters and Caryl and her husband, musician Myfyr Isaac.

    Today Moc is in mainstream school and will take his GCSE’s, with a little bit of one-to-one help, along with his classmates.

    Things are not so straightforward though for the Gillibrand family who are also featured in the documentary.

    The Reverend John Gillibrand is an Anglican priest in Carmarthenshire and their eldest son, 13-year old Adam has severe autism which means 24/7 care. The Gillibrands admit that they’ve had some tough times.

    “I choose my words carefully, but we as a family have been through hell at times,” says John Gillibrand. We’ve had to battle to get what Adam deserves and needs”

    “ We have experienced discrimination too, with people confronting us and asking, “Can’t you control that boy?”

    As Caryl says, “I hope the documentary will make people aware of what autism means and people will understand more and be less likely to judge.”

    Leave a comment:


  • Medford Bronco
    replied
    Originally posted by Jaws
    It must take a huge amount of organisation for you to work things out so that the impact of these transitions is as minimal as possible.

    Best wishes to him for camp and to you and your wife.
    Thank you my fav Sharkie as always you are a class act.

    We are doing the best we can and sometimes you can only do so much. We are praying as Matthew gets older he will be able to accept changes better and know how to calm himself down and relax. We are working and things will get better, I have faith.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jaws
    replied
    Originally posted by Medford Bronco
    he ends school on June 21st and then camp starts on July 3 -August 15th or so.

    His camp is just like school and he needs the "routine" in his life on a daily basis

    Thanks Jaws for taking the time to read, I appreciate it very much
    It must take a huge amount of organisation for you to work things out so that the impact of these transitions is as minimal as possible.

    Best wishes to him for camp and to you and your wife.

    Leave a comment:


  • Medford Bronco
    replied
    Originally posted by Jaws
    I'm sure it's hard for you as a Dad to see him get distressed.

    I admire you and your wife very much with the way you cope.

    I know it's never going to be plain sailing but perhaps it will get a little easier with time the more and more familiar you become with these episodes and also as Matthew himself gets older maybe he will understand a little bit more why certain things happen.

    When does camp start Med?
    he ends school on June 21st and then camp starts on July 3 -August 15th or so.

    His camp is just like school and he needs the "routine" in his life on a daily basis

    Thanks Jaws for taking the time to read, I appreciate it very much

    Leave a comment:


  • Jaws
    replied
    Originally posted by Medford Bronco
    I know this is an old thread but I have to get this off my chest.

    Children with PDD sometimes just lose it very easily and it can be scary. My son who I love very much has been having a rough time lately with transitions etc.

    When he goes to bed at night I asked him to let Isabella to read a certain page. He got mad and grabbed her nose and twised it. (keep in mind Bela is 30 lbs and Matt is 60 lbs) She was not happy etc.

    Then later on when it was time to go to bed, he just starting babbeling something that was not relevant about a show on TV. I told him to take a deep breath etc and he lost it crying and it broke my heard and Carmina finally got him to calm down.

    He for the most part is fine, but with transitions he just has a rough go of it. Now with school ending soon and camp beginning it will be hard on him as well.

    Thanks to all who read and listen. I appreciate it very much. I just want to make people aware the PDD/Autism is still very new to us and we are learning to cope every day.
    I'm sure it's hard for you as a Dad to see him get distressed.

    I admire you and your wife very much with the way you cope.

    I know it's never going to be plain sailing but perhaps it will get a little easier with time the more and more familiar you become with these episodes and also as Matthew himself gets older maybe he will understand a little bit more why certain things happen.

    When does camp start Med?

    Leave a comment:


  • Medford Bronco
    replied
    I know this is an old thread but I have to get this off my chest.

    Children with PDD sometimes just lose it very easily and it can be scary. My son who I love very much has been having a rough time lately with transitions etc.

    When he goes to bed at night I asked him to let Isabella to read a certain page. He got mad and grabbed her nose and twised it. (keep in mind Bela is 30 lbs and Matt is 60 lbs) She was not happy etc.

    Then later on when it was time to go to bed, he just starting babbeling something that was not relevant about a show on TV. I told him to take a deep breath etc and he lost it crying and it broke my heard and Carmina finally got him to calm down.

    He for the most part is fine, but with transitions he just has a rough go of it. Now with school ending soon and camp beginning it will be hard on him as well.

    Thanks to all who read and listen. I appreciate it very much. I just want to make people aware the PDD/Autism is still very new to us and we are learning to cope every day.

    Leave a comment:


  • LordTrychon
    replied
    Originally posted by Jaws
    Could well just be the "terrible twos" she's going through Reid? It's a tricky age.
    True... something to keep in mind... you'll notice some of these patterns when you hear other parents talking about it. If you think you notice TOO MANY... Do some research and then if you're still worried, consult a pediatrician (or Redbirdy80 lol)

    I have a very special nephew (I don't mean in an autism sort of way). He's smart and usually not a brat. He gets most of that cool stuff from me. Anyway... because my sister works with these kids, and she's studying this sort of thing, she has been paranoid at certain times... it's natural.

    Leave a comment:


  • Medford Bronco
    replied
    Originally posted by Reidman
    Med, thanks for sharing and it sounds like you and your family have dealt with this issue very well.. My prayers and support go out to you and your family.

    Ironically you described many things that my daughter does right now. I guess there is no telling at this age (she's 2 1/2) but I had always chalked it up to being a little anal-retentive like her father... I won't speculate at this point but it does have me pondering now.

    Thanks for the insight, I'm sure a lot of people don't know about or understand these disorders.
    No problem Reid, If you do have some doubts have her check by a pediatrition (spelling) it will make you feel better or at least come up with some type or resolution. I am not speculating but it could always help or at least make you feel better.

    Good luck with it wingman

    Leave a comment:


  • Buff_bronc_fan
    replied
    Very enlightening thread Med, thanks for sharing your personal story with us.

    The best thing you can do is to educate those around you about the condition, which you are doing... So kudos to you, and I wish you and your family all the best.

    Leave a comment:


  • Reidman
    replied
    Originally posted by Jaws
    Could well just be the "terrible twos" she's going through Reid? It's a tricky age.
    Thanks Jaws.

    I think that also and plus she is just like me (everything put back where you got it type person) She likes to be tidy so I'm not overly concerned but it gave me a moment of pause...


    Sorry Med, didn't mean to jack your thread buddy...

    Leave a comment:


  • Jaws
    replied
    Originally posted by Reidman
    Med, thanks for sharing and it sounds like you and your family have dealt with this issue very well.. My prayers and support go out to you and your family.

    Ironically you described many things that my daughter does right now. I guess there is no telling at this age (she's 2 1/2) but I had always chalked it up to being a little anal-retentive like her father... I won't speculate at this point but it does have me pondering now.

    Thanks for the insight, I'm sure a lot of people don't know about or understand these disorders.
    Could well just be the "terrible twos" she's going through Reid? It's a tricky age.

    Leave a comment:


  • Reidman
    replied
    Med, thanks for sharing and it sounds like you and your family have dealt with this issue very well.. My prayers and support go out to you and your family.

    Ironically you described many things that my daughter does right now. I guess there is no telling at this age (she's 2 1/2) but I had always chalked it up to being a little anal-retentive like her father... I won't speculate at this point but it does have me pondering now.

    Thanks for the insight, I'm sure a lot of people don't know about or understand these disorders.

    Leave a comment:

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