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  • Eating Crow...

    I completely understand that we talk about eating crow and what it means. my question is, how did eating crow get this particular connotation?
    Go Broncos, make me keep believing this year


  • #2
    Originally posted by MN-Broncofreak
    I completely understand that we talk about eating crow and what it means. my question is, how did eating crow get this particular connotation?
    From Wikipedia:

    It is most likely an Americanization of the English "To eat humble pie". The English phrase is something of a pun — "umbles" were the intestines and other unsavories of a deer. Pies made of this were known to be served to those of lesser class who did not eat at the king's/lord's/governor's table.

    At any rate, crow seems to be the distasteful meat of choice because it is stringy, it is carrion meat, and apparently tastes poorly. An old tale passed around amongst hunters advises that, if one runs out of food while alone in the woods, catch a crow, put it in a pot with a boot, boil it for a week, and then eat the boot.

    Another dish likely to be served with humble pie is rook pie (rooks being closely related to crows). This may be another clue as to how humble pie became boiled crow.

    Another possible connection comes from a short story by Rudyard Kipling. In his story 'The Strange Ride of Morrowbie Jukes' Morrowbie Jukes falls into a place from which he cannot escape. Another man trapped there catches wild crows and eats them, but Morrowbie in his pride declares, 'I shall never eat crow!' After days of nothing to eat, his hunger and desperation finally forces him to do what he swore he would never do - literally eat crow.



    Althougoh I also read somewhere that the Americans or British made the otherside eat crow after a cetrain battle or something.

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    • #3
      Linky

      An article published in the Atlanta Constitution in 1888 claims that, towards the end of the war of 1812, an American went hunting and by accident crossed behind the British lines, where he shot a crow. He was caught by a British officer, who, complimenting him on his fine shooting, persuaded him to hand over his gun. This officer then levelled his gun and said that as a punishment the American must take a bite of the crow. The American obeyed, but when the British officer returned his gun he took his revenge by making him eat the rest of the bird. This is such an inventive novelisation of the phrase’s etymology that it seems a shame to point out that the original expression is not recorded until the 1850s, and that its original form was to eat boiled crow, whereas the story makes no mention of boiling the bird.
      President of the GPA, Head of Mainland Europe Chapter




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      • #4
        Originally posted by Kapaibro
        Linky

        An article published in the Atlanta Constitution in 1888 claims that, towards the end of the war of 1812, an American went hunting and by accident crossed behind the British lines, where he shot a crow. He was caught by a British officer, who, complimenting him on his fine shooting, persuaded him to hand over his gun. This officer then levelled his gun and said that as a punishment the American must take a bite of the crow. The American obeyed, but when the British officer returned his gun he took his revenge by making him eat the rest of the bird. This is such an inventive novelisation of the phrase’s etymology that it seems a shame to point out that the original expression is not recorded until the 1850s, and that its original form was to eat boiled crow, whereas the story makes no mention of boiling the bird.
        That's the American British story.

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        2. Taxes
        3. The Ball Being Picked Off by Champ Bailey

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        • #5
          I invented it.

          Just like "hot stuff" was invented for me!

          Comment


          • #6
            Crow Pie

            1 crow
            stuffing of your choice
            salt and pepper
            shortening
            flour
            2 Pie crust mixes
            2-3 hard-boiled eggs

            Stuff the crow. Loosen joints with a knife but do not cut through.
            Simmer the crow in a stew-pan, with enough water to cover, until
            nearly tender, then season with salt and pepper. Remove meat from
            bones and set aside.

            Prepare pie crusts as directed. (Do not bake)

            Make a medium thick gravy with flour, shortening, and juices in
            which the crow has cooked and let cool.

            Line a pie plate with pie crust and line with slices of hard-boiled
            egg. Place crow meat on top. Layer gravy over the crow. Place
            second pie dough crust over top.

            Bake at 450 degrees for 1/2 hour.


            The recipe I found for Crow Pie. We baked a lot of these for the Pats last season
            President of the GPA, Head of Mainland Europe Chapter




            formerly Officially Adopted by saltybuggah
            I adopted Skywalker

            I have been adopted by Chris Wade

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Kapaibro
              Crow Pie

              1 crow
              stuffing of your choice
              salt and pepper
              shortening
              flour
              2 Pie crust mixes
              2-3 hard-boiled eggs

              Stuff the crow. Loosen joints with a knife but do not cut through.
              Simmer the crow in a stew-pan, with enough water to cover, until
              nearly tender, then season with salt and pepper. Remove meat from
              bones and set aside.

              Prepare pie crusts as directed. (Do not bake)

              Make a medium thick gravy with flour, shortening, and juices in
              which the crow has cooked and let cool.

              Line a pie plate with pie crust and line with slices of hard-boiled
              egg. Place crow meat on top. Layer gravy over the crow. Place
              second pie dough crust over top.

              Bake at 450 degrees for 1/2 hour.


              The recipe I found for Crow Pie. We baked a lot of these for the Pats last season

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              • #8
                Originally posted by cinnamunmun
                I invented it.

                Just like "hot stuff" was invented for me!
                You are so right.....







                And Kap, you crack me up!
                ...capture it...remember it...

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Snk16
                  From Wikipedia:

                  It is most likely an Americanization of the English "To eat humble pie". The English phrase is something of a pun — "umbles" were the intestines and other unsavories of a deer. Pies made of this were known to be served to those of lesser class who did not eat at the king's/lord's/governor's table.

                  At any rate, crow seems to be the distasteful meat of choice because it is stringy, it is carrion meat, and apparently tastes poorly. An old tale passed around amongst hunters advises that, if one runs out of food while alone in the woods, catch a crow, put it in a pot with a boot, boil it for a week, and then eat the boot.

                  Another dish likely to be served with humble pie is rook pie (rooks being closely related to crows). This may be another clue as to how humble pie became boiled crow.

                  Another possible connection comes from a short story by Rudyard Kipling. In his story 'The Strange Ride of Morrowbie Jukes' Morrowbie Jukes falls into a place from which he cannot escape. Another man trapped there catches wild crows and eats them, but Morrowbie in his pride declares, 'I shall never eat crow!' After days of nothing to eat, his hunger and desperation finally forces him to do what he swore he would never do - literally eat crow.



                  Althougoh I also read somewhere that the Americans or British made the otherside eat crow after a cetrain battle or something.
                  Thanks...I never would have imagined that this would have been in Wikpedia

                  CP when I get more...
                  Go Broncos, make me keep believing this year

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kapaibro
                    Linky

                    An article published in the Atlanta Constitution in 1888 claims that, towards the end of the war of 1812, an American went hunting and by accident crossed behind the British lines, where he shot a crow. He was caught by a British officer, who, complimenting him on his fine shooting, persuaded him to hand over his gun. This officer then levelled his gun and said that as a punishment the American must take a bite of the crow. The American obeyed, but when the British officer returned his gun he took his revenge by making him eat the rest of the bird. This is such an inventive novelisation of the phrase’s etymology that it seems a shame to point out that the original expression is not recorded until the 1850s, and that its original form was to eat boiled crow, whereas the story makes no mention of boiling the bird.
                    I appreciate the info, thanks

                    CP when I get more...

                    ick, a raw bird. I am sure they both had some GI problems after that...
                    Go Broncos, make me keep believing this year

                    Comment

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