Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Southstander's Word of the Day

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Southstander's Word of the Day

    I'll try to post a new word a day to help expand our vocabluary

    Quotidian (kwoh-TID-ee-un) adjective – occurring every day; belonging to each day; everyday; commonplace, ordinary

    As an employee, Mac is gifted at solving the difficult problems that arise from time to time, but he is often careless about the quotidian responsibilities of his job.

    In Shakespeare's play As You Like It, the character Rosalind observes that Orlando, who has been running about in the woods carving her name on trees and hanging love poems on branches, "seems to have the quotidian of love upon him." Shakespeare's use doesn't make it clear that "quotidian" derives from a Latin word that means "every day." But as odd as it may seem, Shakespeare's use of "quotidian" is just a short semantic step away from the "daily" adjective sense. Some fevers occur intermittently -- sometimes daily. The phrase "quotidian fever" and the noun "quotidian" have long been used for such recurring maladies. Poor Orlando is simply afflicted with such a "fever" of love.
    Ask me about My Jesus and how to have a relationship with Him.

    Red Sox Mafia RLF4 Life! Boston 617 Strong!
    sigpic

  • #2
    Yaw (YAW) verb – to deviate erratically from a course; to move from side to side; to turn by angular motion about the vertical axis; alternate

    The gigantic wave caused our boat to yaw sharply to port, but thanks to some clever steering by the old man, we were able to get safely back on course.

    In the heyday of large sailing ships, numerous nautical words appeared on the horizon, many of which have origins that have never been traced. "Yaw" is one such word. It began showing up in print in the 16th century, first as a noun (meaning "movement off course" or "side to side movement") and then as a verb. For more than 350 years it remained a sailing word, with occasional side trips to the figurative sense "to alternate." Then dawned the era of airplane flight in the early 20th century, and "yawing" was no longer confined to the sea. Nowadays, people who love boats still use "yaw" much as did the sailing-men of old, but pilots and rocket scientists also refer to the "yawing" of their crafts.
    Ask me about My Jesus and how to have a relationship with Him.

    Red Sox Mafia RLF4 Life! Boston 617 Strong!
    sigpic

    Comment


    • #3
      These are cool. Should help expand my vocab

      Comment


      • #4
        try pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Lord of the Dance
          try pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis.
          Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis (also spelled -koniosis) is an alleged lung disease caused by the inhalation of very fine silica dust found in volcanoes. It was originally coined to serve as the longest English word. The more general and widely used term for this condition is pneumoconiosis.
          sigpic
          Thanks Blondie for the Sig

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by BlueFlames
            Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis (also spelled -koniosis) is an alleged lung disease caused by the inhalation of very fine silica dust found in volcanoes. It was originally coined to serve as the longest English word. The more general and widely used term for this condition is pneumoconiosis.
            damn you are one of the few people who know that.

            Comment


            • #7
              This is a good thread South
              THE TRUTH

              Comment


              • #8
                Legerdemain (lej-er-duh-MAYN) noun – sleight of hand; a display of skill and adroitness

                It was an impressive feat of legerdemain for Nicholas to take a dollar bill and instantly turn it into twenty nickels.

                In Middle French, folks who were clever enough to fool others with fast-fingered illusions were described as "leger de main," literally "light of hand." English speakers condensed that phrase into a noun when they borrowed it in the 15th century and began using it as an alternative to the older "sleight of hand." (That term for dexterity or skill in using one's hands makes use of "sleight," an old word from Middle English that derives from an Old Norse word meaning "sly.") In more modern times, a feat of legerdemain can even be accomplished without using your hands, as in, for example "an impressive bit of financial legerdemain."
                Ask me about My Jesus and how to have a relationship with Him.

                Red Sox Mafia RLF4 Life! Boston 617 Strong!
                sigpic

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Southstander
                  Quotidian (kwoh-TID-ee-un) adjective – occurring every day; belonging to each day; everyday; commonplace, ordinary

                  I found this juxtaposition quite humorous


                  "When Kepler found his long-cherished belief did not agree with the most precise observation, he accepted the uncomfortable fact. He preferred the hard truth to his dearest illusions; that is the heart of science."
                  - Carl Sagan

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Kafkaesque- (one of my favorite words!)-

                    1. characterized by surreal distortion and a sense of impending danger;
                    2.**Something that eludes understanding the more one pursues it**
                    3. Of or relating to French writer Franz Kafka or his writings




                    **I like to use the word in this way, as it's so confusing**

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Parsimonious (par-suh-MON-nee-us) adjective – exhibiting or marked by parsimony; frugal to the point of stinginess; sparing, restrained

                      The parsimonious lady refused to buy Girl Scout cookies because she thought they are overpriced.

                      English isn't stingy when it comes to synonyms of "parsimonious." "Stingy," "close," "penurious," and "miserly" are a few terms that, like "parsimonious," suggest an unwillingness to share with others. "Stingy" implies a marked lack of generosity, whereas "close" suggests keeping a tight grip on one's money and possessions. "Penurious" implies frugality that gives an appearance of actual poverty, and "miserly" suggests avariciousness and a morbid pleasure in hoarding. "Parsimonious" usually suggests an extreme frugality that borders on stinginess.
                      Ask me about My Jesus and how to have a relationship with Him.

                      Red Sox Mafia RLF4 Life! Boston 617 Strong!
                      sigpic

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Bump for the further enhancement of people's writing :thumb:


                        "When Kepler found his long-cherished belief did not agree with the most precise observation, he accepted the uncomfortable fact. He preferred the hard truth to his dearest illusions; that is the heart of science."
                        - Carl Sagan

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          This is the longest word:

                          ACETYL*SERYL*TYROSYL*SERYL*ISO*LEUCYL*THREONYL*SER YL*PROLYL*SERYL*GLUTAMINYL*PHENYL*ALANYL*VALYL*PHE NYL*ALANYL*LEUCYL*SERYL*SERYL*VALYL*TRYPTOPHYL*ALA NYL*ASPARTYL*PROLYL*ISOLEUCYL*GLUTAMYL*LEUCYL*LEUC YL*ASPARAGINYL*VALYL*CYSTEINYL*THREONYL*SERYL*SERY L*LEUCYL*GLYCYL*ASPARAGINYL*GLUTAMINYL*PHENYL*ALAN YL*GLUTAMINYL*THREONYL*GLUTAMINYL*GLUTAMINYL*ALANY L*ARGINYL*THREONYL*THREONYL*GLUTAMINYL*VALYL*GLUTA MINYL*GLUTAMINYL*PHENYL*ALANYL*SERYL*GLUTAMINYL*VA LYL*TRYPTOPHYL*LYSYL*PROLYL*PHENYL*ALANYL*PROLYL*G LUTAMINYL*SERYL*THREONYL*VALYL*ARGINYL*PHENYL*ALAN YL*PROLYL*GLYCYL*ASPARTYL*VALYL*TYROSYL*LYSYL*VALY L*TYROSYL*ARGINYL*TYROSYL*ASPARAGINYL*ALANYL*VALYL *LEUCYL*ASPARTYL*PROLYL*LEUCYL*ISOLEUCYL*THREONYL* ALANYL*LEUCYL*LEUCYL*GLYCYL*THREONYL*PHENYL*ALANYL *ASPARTYL*THREONYL*ARGINYL*ASPARAGINYL*ARGINYL*ISO LEUCYL*ISOLEUCYL*GLUTAMYL*VALYL*GLUTAMYL*ASPARAGIN YL*GLUTAMINYL*GLUTAMINYL*SERYL*PROLYL*THREONYL*THR EONYL*ALANYL*GLUTAMYL*THREONYL*LEUCYL*ASPARTYL*ALA NYL*THREONYL*ARGINYL*ARGINYL*VALYL*ASPARTYL*ASPART YL*ALANYL*THREONYL*VALYL*ALANYL*ISOLEUCYL*ARGINYL* SERYL*ALANYL*ASPARAGINYL*ISOLEUCYL*ASPARAGINYL*LEU CYL*VALYL*ASPARAGINYL*GLUTAMYL*LEUCYL*VALYL*ARGINY L*GLYCYL*THREONYL*GLYCYL*LEUCYL*TYROSYL*ASPARAGINY L*GLUTAMINYL*ASPARAGINYL*THREONYL*PHENYL*ALANYL*GL UTAMYL*SERYL*METHIONYL*SERYL*GLYCYL*LEUCYL*VALYL*T RYPTOPHYL*THREONYL*SERYL*ALANYL*PROLYL*ALANYL*SERI NE

                          = Tobacco Mosaic Virus, Dahlemense Strain.
                          This word has appeared in the American Chemical Society's Chemical Abstracts and is thus considered by some to be the longest real word.
                          Last edited by champbronc2; 02-04-2007, 01:50 PM.
                          MMA News
                          MMA News 247

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The morning JT called in and said that her truck would not start was not factual; she actually had a blinding katzenjammer.

                            Have you ever heard a cat wailing and felt that you could relate? Apparently some hungover German speakers once did. "Katzenjammer" comes from the German "Katze" (meaning "cat") and "Jammer" (meaning "distress"). English speakers borrowed the word for their hangovers (and other distressful inner states) in the 19th century and eventually applied it to outer commotion as well. The word isn't as popular in English today as it was around the mid-20th century, but it's well-known to many because of the "Katzenjammer Kids," a long-running comic strip featuring the incorrigibly mischievous twins Hans and Fritz.
                            Ask me about My Jesus and how to have a relationship with Him.

                            Red Sox Mafia RLF4 Life! Boston 617 Strong!
                            sigpic

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Concinnity (kun-SIH-nuh-tee) noun – harmony or elegance of design especially of literary style in adaptation of parts to a whole or each other

                              Julie maintains that no modern play can rival the concinnity of the classical Greek tragedies.

                              The Romans apparently found perfect harmony in a well-mixed drink. The cocktail in question was a beverage they called "cinnus," and so agreeably concordant did they find it that its name apparently inspired the formation of "concinnare," a verb meaning "to place fitly together." "Concinnare" gave rise to "concinnus," meaning "skillfully put together," which in turn fermented into "concinnitas." English speakers added the word to our mix in the 1500s as "concinnity."
                              Ask me about My Jesus and how to have a relationship with Him.

                              Red Sox Mafia RLF4 Life! Boston 617 Strong!
                              sigpic

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X