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  • #46
    The book is a collection of opuscula written by the author between his two major novels.

    "Opusculum" -- which is often used in its plural form "opuscula" -- comes from Latin, where it serves as the diminutive form of the noun "opus," meaning "work." In English, "opus" can refer to any literary or artistic work, though it often specifically refers to a musical piece. Logically, then, "opusculum" refers to a short or minor work. ("Opusculum" isn't restricted to music, though. In fact, it is most often used for literary works.) The Latin plural of "opus" is "opera," which gave us (via Italian) the word we know for a musical production consisting primarily of vocal pieces performed with orchestral accompaniment. We can also thank "opus" for our verb "operate."
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    • #47
      Piliferous (py-LIF-uhr-uhs) adjective – having or producing hair

      Some men can go through their entire life-span being piliferous but, others begin lose that ability by the time they reach age 20.

      From Latin pilus - hair
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      • #48
        Originally posted by darrent/hero
        You must spread some Contributor Status around before giving it to BRONCOS_OWN_U16 again.
        I would suggest saving that CP....of course you probably already gave it out
        but poking fun at people is not CP worthy.
        Tony G


        The Chefs

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        • #49
          Originally posted by KCLadyFan
          I would suggest saving that CP....of course you probably already gave it out
          but poking fun at people is not CP worthy.
          You must spread some Contributor Status around before giving it to KCLadyFan again.
          [URL=http://s93.photobucket.com/user/Saddletramp69/media/asdf.jpg.html][/URL
          Adopted player Lindsey

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          • #50
            Originally posted by KCLadyFan
            I would suggest saving that CP....of course you probably already gave it out
            but poking fun at people is not CP worthy.
            ok. ill try to resist. hes just so sarcastic.
            white sox are done, broncos looking strong, lakers gonna win it all again.

            Originally posted by raylewis52
            you guys are the saddest team in nfl right now! 8-8 will win the west,.thats just a joke. there will be 6-8 teams sitting home with better records,
            smart fans, eh?

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            • #51
              Originally posted by darrent/hero
              ok. ill try to resist. hes just so sarcastic.
              sarcasm has its place. Poking fun at someone doesnt. Unless its at LT.

              Unfortunately it will take you and the rest of the teenagers of this world so long to realize that, that you will probably miss out on lots of wisdom being passed on to you. I wish I had kept my mouth shut as a smart-assed teenager and just listened. One day you too shall realize that us old folks do know a thing or three.
              Last edited by Saddletramp; 04-26-2007, 07:35 PM.
              [URL=http://s93.photobucket.com/user/Saddletramp69/media/asdf.jpg.html][/URL
              Adopted player Lindsey

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              • #52
                Perfunctory (per-FUNK-tuh-ree) adjective – characterized by routine or superficiality; mechanical; lacking in interest or enthusiasm

                Clearly exhausted after a long day on the phone, Nick gave only a perfunctory account of how his day went.

                "Perfunctory" is a word whose origins are found entirely in Latin. First appearing in English in the late 16th century, it derives via the Late Latin "perfunctorius," meaning "done in a careless or superficial manner," from the Latin "perfungi," meaning "to accomplish" or "to get through with." That verb is formed by combining the prefix "per-," meaning "through," with the verb "fungi," meaning "to perform." "Fungi" can be found in the roots of such words as "function," "defunct," and "fungible." "Perfunctory" can describe something that is carried out with little effort or care, as in "He did a perfunctory job raking the leaves," but when used to describe a person it usually means "lacking enthusiasm."
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                • #53
                  Mythomania (mith-uh-MAY-nee-uh) noun – an excessive or abnormal propensity for lying or exaggerating

                  Ted’s mythomania finally caught up with him when he said he was from the planet Krypton.

                  We wouldn't lie to you about the history of "mythomania." It comes from two ancient roots, the Greek "mythos" (meaning "myth") and the Late Latin "mania" (meaning "insanity marked by uncontrolled emotion or excitement"). One myth about "mythomania" is that it's a very old word; actually, the earliest known uses of the term date only from the beginning of the 20th century. It was predated by a related word, "mythomaniac," which appeared around the middle of the 19th century. "Mythomaniac" initially referred to someone who was obsessed with or passionate about myths but was eventually used for individuals affected with or exhibiting mythomania.
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                  • #54
                    Internecine (in-ter-NESS-een) adjective – marked by slaughter; deadly; mutually destructive; of, relating to, or involving conflict within a group

                    When the three brothers took over the family business together, it didn't take long for the internecine feuding to begin.

                    "Internecine" comes from the Latin "internecinus" ("fought to the death" or "destructive"), which traces to the verb "necare" ("to kill") and the prefix "inter-." ("Inter-" usually means "between" or "mutual" in Latin, but it can also indicate the completion of an action.) "Internecine" meant "deadly" when it appeared in English in 1663, but when Samuel Johnson entered it in his dictionary almost a century later, he was apparently misled by "inter-" and defined the word as "endeavouring mutual destruction." Johnson's definition was carried into later dictionaries, and before long his sense was the dominant meaning of the word. "Internecine" developed the association with internal group conflict in the 20th century, and that's the most common sense today.
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                    • #55
                      Euphemism (YOO-fuh-miz-um) noun – the substitution of an agreeable or inoffensive expression for one that may offend or suggest something unpleasant; also the expression so substituted

                      Ellen would never say that someone had "died"; she preferred to communicate the unpleasant news with euphemisms like "passed on."

                      "Euphemism" derives from the Greek word "euphemos," which means "auspicious" or "sounding good." The first part of "euphçmos" is the Greek prefix "eu-," meaning "well." The second part is "phçmç," a Greek word for "speech" that is itself a derivative of the verb "phanai," meaning "to speak." Among the numerous linguistic cousins of "euphemism" on the "eu-" side of the family are "eulogy," "euphoria," and "euthanasia"; on the "phanai" side, its kin include "prophet" and "aphasia" ("loss of the power to understand words").
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                      • #56
                        Alopecia (al-uh-PEE-shuh) noun – loss of hair, wool, or feathers; baldness

                        Many sentences could be used that contain the word alopecia to describe the management of the Oakland Raiders.

                        Doctors use "alopecia" to refer to various forms of hair loss, including "alopecia areata," a sudden loss of hair in patches that involves little or no inflammation. It may surprise you to learn that the word ultimately derives from "alôpçx," the Greek word for "fox," but the connection makes sense if you think of a fox who is afflicted with mange, a disease with symptoms that include, among other things, loss of hair. Middle English
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