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The Song Title Game

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  • CanDB
    replied
    Originally posted by samparnell View Post
    "Get Back" - The Beatles (1969)
    Get Off My Cloud - Rolling Stones

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  • samparnell
    replied
    "Get Back" - The Beatles (1969)

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  • CanDB
    replied
    Originally posted by samparnell View Post
    "Lookin' Out My Back Door" ~ Creedence Clearwater Revival from Cosmo's Factory (1970) written by John Fogerty
    Back In The USSR - The Beatles (my all time favs)


    (this version by Paul McCartney and band)

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  • samparnell
    replied
    "Lookin' Out My Back Door" ~ Creedence Clearwater Revival from Cosmo's Factory (1970) written by John Fogerty

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  • CanDB
    replied
    Originally posted by L.M. View Post

    Got a Lot on My Head
    Artist: The Cars
    Album: Candy-O
    Released: 1979


    Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head - B.J.Thomas
    Written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David
    This unforgettable clip from the great movie Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid (1969)

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  • L.M.
    replied
    Originally posted by CanDB View Post

    Goin Out Of My Head - Cilla Black
    Got a Lot on My Head
    Artist: The Cars
    Album: Candy-O
    Released: 1979



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  • CanDB
    replied
    Originally posted by Sophia23 View Post

    Heavy is the head - Zac Brown Band and Chris Cornell
    Goin Out Of My Head - Cilla Black

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  • Sophia23
    replied
    Originally posted by CanDB View Post

    He Ain't Heavy He's My Brother - The Hollies



    (Another classic!!! So many memories!! When my dear brother-in-law was near end, and not communicating very well, I looked at him and said, "He ain't heavy" to which he quickly responded, "He's my brother." It was perfect. Near end, under the influence of strong meds, but able to remember the words. It gave us a tiny bit of happiness that evening.)
    Heavy is the head - Zac Brown Band and Chris Cornell

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  • CanDB
    replied
    Originally posted by L.M. View Post

    That's the whole point of this exercise IMO –it moves your attention toward music and inspires some listening!


    "Brother Where You Bound" is the epic length title track to Supertramp's 1985 album of the same name. Written and sung by keyboardist Rick Davies, it is the longest song Supertramp ever recorded clocking in at 16 and a half minutes (surpassing "Try Again" from their 1970 self titled debut album by more than three minutes).

    The introduction to the track features a reading from George Orwell's novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, fragments of spoken news reports, and the final lines from the nursery rhyme "Oranges and Lemons". An excerpt from "The Internationale" can also be heard from minute 1:10. The introduction is followed by lyrics that speak about the Cold War that was happening at the time of the recording in 1984.

    The guitar solos throughout the track were performed by Pink Floyd guitarist David Gilmour, who used his own mixing system where he controlled every sound that went from his guitar onto the album.
    He Ain't Heavy He's My Brother - The Hollies



    (Another classic!!! So many memories!! When my dear brother-in-law was near end, and not communicating very well, I looked at him and said, "He ain't heavy" to which he quickly responded, "He's my brother." It was perfect. Near end, under the influence of strong meds, but able to remember the words. It gave us a tiny bit of happiness that evening.)

    Leave a comment:


  • CanDB
    replied
    Originally posted by L.M. View Post

    That's the whole point of this exercise IMO –it moves your attention toward music and inspires some listening!


    "Brother Where You Bound" is the epic length title track to Supertramp's 1985 album of the same name. Written and sung by keyboardist Rick Davies, it is the longest song Supertramp ever recorded clocking in at 16 and a half minutes (surpassing "Try Again" from their 1970 self titled debut album by more than three minutes).

    The introduction to the track features a reading from George Orwell's novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, fragments of spoken news reports, and the final lines from the nursery rhyme "Oranges and Lemons". An excerpt from "The Internationale" can also be heard from minute 1:10. The introduction is followed by lyrics that speak about the Cold War that was happening at the time of the recording in 1984.

    The guitar solos throughout the track were performed by Pink Floyd guitarist David Gilmour, who used his own mixing system where he controlled every sound that went from his guitar onto the album.
    Interesting. Often when I do things such as this, I tend to learn more about the artists. I knew little about the individuals in Three Dog Night, but since posting a couple of their songs, I started googling up the boys. In so many cases, fame does not equate to long term happiness. But many of them do get it together at some point.

    But overall, creativity is an amazing thing. People who have it are consumed by it at times. If I had jobs I would like to have earned, one would be as a colleague of a team of writers for comedy shows/skits (ie. SNL), late night shows, and the like. Or one who comes up with new and exciting marketing promos. These are jobs with no set hours of work, because the creative juices sometimes flow better at 2 am, than 2 pm. Admittedly, not a great job if you have children, even just a great partner. But jobs that are inspired by constant thought and interaction with others of like mind in terms of creativity, are almost the ultimate job for me. My best career days were when I was on key project teams, with good folks who were bright but more so, supportive.

    Leave a comment:


  • L.M.
    replied
    Originally posted by CanDB View Post

    Homeward Bound - Simon & Garfunkel

    (the more I do this the more great songs I get to think about)
    That's the whole point of this exercise IMO –it moves your attention toward music and inspires some listening!


    "Brother Where You Bound" is the epic length title track to Supertramp's 1985 album of the same name. Written and sung by keyboardist Rick Davies, it is the longest song Supertramp ever recorded clocking in at 16 and a half minutes (surpassing "Try Again" from their 1970 self titled debut album by more than three minutes).

    The introduction to the track features a reading from George Orwell's novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, fragments of spoken news reports, and the final lines from the nursery rhyme "Oranges and Lemons". An excerpt from "The Internationale" can also be heard from minute 1:10. The introduction is followed by lyrics that speak about the Cold War that was happening at the time of the recording in 1984.

    The guitar solos throughout the track were performed by Pink Floyd guitarist David Gilmour, who used his own mixing system where he controlled every sound that went from his guitar onto the album.

    Leave a comment:


  • CanDB
    replied
    Originally posted by 2 Minute Warning View Post

    "East Bound and Down"~Jerry Reed
    Homeward Bound - Simon & Garfunkel



    (the more I do this the more great songs I get to think about)

    Leave a comment:


  • 2 Minute Warning
    replied
    Originally posted by samparnell View Post
    "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" - The Band from The Band (1969)
    "East Bound and Down"~Jerry Reed

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  • samparnell
    replied
    "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" - The Band from The Band (1969)
    Last edited by samparnell; 07-06-2021, 06:52 PM. Reason: spelling

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  • CanDB
    replied
    Originally posted by samparnell View Post
    "One After 909" - The Beatles from Let It Be (1970)
    One More Night - Phil Colins

    Leave a comment:

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