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Shanahan's play-calling get's a little respect from people who know......

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  • Shanahan's play-calling get's a little respect from people who know......

    http://www.usatoday.com/sports/footb...ers-main_N.htm


    Revealing the NFL's best play-caller

    By Chris Colston, USA TODAY
    Who are the NFL's best play-callers?

    That question was posed to members of USA TODAY's NFL staff (Jarrett Bell, Chris Colston, Jim Corbett, Nate Davis, Larry Weisman and Skip Wood).

    Each submitted a top-10 list, and each play-calling coach received 10 points for first-place votes, nine for second place, etc.

    From those votes, a list of the NFL's top 15 play-callers was compiled, with comments from the nation's top analysts: Troy Aikman of Fox, Cris Collinsworth of NBC, Ron Jaworski of ESPN and Phil Simms of CBS.

    (Note: NFL experience includes entire career, not just years of play-calling.)
    FIND MORE STORIES IN: NFL | Super Bowls | Norv Turner | Mike Holmgren | QBS | Offense | Bill Walsh | Primary | Cris Collinsworth | Tom Moore

    1. MIKE HOLMGREN (53 points), Seattle Seahawks head coach

    • NFL experience: 22 years.

    • Spot: Sideline.

    • Offense rank: 12th.

    • Primary influence: Bill Walsh.

    • Expert says: "He's absolutely outstanding as far as his attention to detail within the passing game and how routes are supposed to be run," says Aikman. "I've seen him stop practice and really let players have it for not understanding route depths. You have to be that way if you're going to be successful throwing the football. It's mandatory that guys are where they're supposed to be. Coaches who aren't that specific about it don't understand how difficult it is to play quarterback. Sometimes you can't see a receiver, and you have rely on him being where he's supposed to be."

    • Expert says: "Matt Hasselbeck can look at more receivers on one pass play than anybody I've seen in the NFL," Simms adds. "And that is a direct reflection of Mike Holmgren and his system."

    2. TOM MOORE (46 points) Indianapolis Colts offensive coordinator

    • NFL experience: 31 years.

    • Spot: Sideline.

    • Offense rank: 3rd.

    • Primary influence: Chuck Noll.

    • Experts say: "No disrespect to Tom Moore whatsoever," Aikman says. "But because Peyton Manning does so many of the calls at the line of scrimmage, and knowing how much time he puts in, it would be hard to argue against Peyton as the Colts' play-caller."

    But Simms doesn't quite see it that way.

    "You're giving Peyton too much credit," he says. "Tom Moore is the one who designs the offense and gives Peyton all the thoughts and ideas. Peyton is just doing what Tom has taught him all week to do. Remember, Moore did it with the Steelers (helping Pittsburgh win Super Bowls XIII and XIV) and Lions (in 1995, Detroit led the NFL in total offense and became the first NFL team with two 100-catch receivers)."

    3. MIKE SHANAHAN (38 points) Denver Broncos head coach

    • NFL experience: 24 years.

    • Spot: Sideline.

    • Offense rank: 9th.

    • Primary influences: Barry Switzer, Charlie Pell, Bill Walsh and George Seifert.

    • Expert says: "I'm a huge Mike Shanahan fan," Jaworski says. "He's a great designer of offense, so he's always been great early in games exploiting a defense."

    • Expert says: "Going to San Francisco (as offensive coordinator from 1992-94) really helped him, because he was forced to run the West Coast offense," Aikman says. "He was able to take the passing game, with what he knew in the running game, and it's been a great marriage. His critics would say, 'Well, what has he does since John Elway retired?' But it's unfair to use that against him, because you still need great players."

    4. JOSH McDANIELS (34 points) New England Patriots offensive coordinator

    • NFL experience: Seven years.

    • Spot: Sideline.

    • Offense rank: 1st.

    • Primary influences: His father, Thom McDaniels, Charlie Weis and Bill Belichick.

    • Expert says: "When you have talent, you have to adjust to it regardless of your style," Simms says. "He's done that, and it's a tremendous credit to him. There is going to be a lot of talk about him (for a head coaching job) for what he's done. He's not stuck in the 'West Coast offense.' He's not locked in to a 'this is the way it's gonna be' type of play."

    5. JASON GARRETT (30 points) Dallas Cowboys offensive coordinator

    • NFL experience: Three years.

    • Spot: Sideline.

    • Offense rank: 2nd.

    • Primary influences: His father, Jim Garrett, Norv Turner, Ernie Zampese, Chan Gailey, Sean Payton, Jim Fassel, Jon Gruden, Scott Linehan and Mike Mularkey.

    • Expert says: When asked how long before he thought Garrett, 41, would get a head coaching job, Jaworski said, "Next year."

    • Expert says: "He's smart. He works hard. He's a great communicator. He's one of those guys who can relate to a diverse group of people. He's got great integrity. Just the whole package," says Aikman.



    Some of you can go vote for Jason Garrett, if you'd like......

  • #2
    Expert says: "I'm a huge Mike Shanahan fan," Jaworski says. "He's a great designer of offense, so he's always been great early in games exploiting a defense."
    The key word in here is early in the game...

    I know he designs the first series for every game, but damn.. once we get a lead it's always hard for us to keep it.

    Play calling? Or poor execution.

    Could be a combination of them both.

    But good read!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by B4Bronco6 View Post
      The key word in here is early in the game...

      I know he designs the first series for every game, but damn.. once we get a lead it's always hard for us to keep it.

      Play calling? Or poor execution.

      Could be a combination of them both.

      But good read!

      That's a great point, because this team is nowhere near as good in the second half of games (Or seasons for that matter) as they are in the first half......And Shanahan has to take his share of the blame for that.

      But I also believe this to be true because of how small the Broncos are, they wear down and lose their effectiveness, imo.

      This offense just isn't as effective late because the offensive line simply cannot impose their will. Shanahan has to take his share of the blame for that too......

      Comment


      • #4
        How can you give the OC of the Colts mention, when all he does is give Manning an 'idea' of what to run, and Manning runs the offense from the field? If you ask me, thats the easiest job in the NFL.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for the post. We've put up huge chunks of yardage, that's for sure. Unfortunately we lack in the red zone, otherwise he'd have a case for number one on the list. That's where you ask the question: is it play calling or execution?

          Originally posted by Ravage!!! View Post
          How can you give the OC of the Colts mention, when all he does is give Manning an 'idea' of what to run, and Manning runs the offense from the field? If you ask me, thats the easiest job in the NFL.
          He also draws up the plays. It's not an easy task coming up with plays and formations that utilize your players talents. More so than that he game-plans for the up-coming week. I believe this guy's been there since Peyton's been there. So, essentially, he's taught Peyton the ropes. That includes what plays to use in what situations. How to read the defense and chose what plays to call. The guy's good, and I don't understand how he's still in Indi after all of these years. My guess it that it's his choice to stay there.

          Comment


          • #6
            Well, obviously Jaworski, Simms, and Aikman don't read these boards, or they would have the REAL story...


            I know that alot of people in the sports writing world don't have too much on the ball, but these are three names that I sit up and listen to when they break down a play, especially Jaws. Shanny can't look too many other places to blame for the bricks he has to work with, but once he has a good stack of players, he's the best there is.
            Last edited by gobroncsnv; 12-26-2007, 09:15 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Good for Shanahan. I think Shanahan is good. He is great. Two losing years in his whole time in Colorado. Not too shabby.

              But man, Shanahan has been coaching since I was a baby. He's been coaching since his quarterback was born. Wow.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Maharishineo View Post
                He also draws up the plays. It's not an easy task coming up with plays and formations that utilize your players talents. More so than that he game-plans for the up-coming week. I believe this guy's been there since Peyton's been there. So, essentially, he's taught Peyton the ropes. That includes what plays to use in what situations. How to read the defense and chose what plays to call. The guy's good, and I don't understand how he's still in Indi after all of these years. My guess it that it's his choice to stay there.
                why is he still there as opposed to getting a HC job offer? Simple... its because he has Peyton Manning. Everyone knows how they work the system there. He says 'Run Right, or pass left'... and Manning calls three plays in the huddle, and then chooses the play to run at the LoS. Its hard to see just who is really running the offense when the QB is literally running the offense on the field.

                That is why he hasn't been offered a HC job.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by gobroncsnv View Post
                  Shanny can't look too many other places to blame for the bricks he has to work with, but once he has a good stack of players, he's the best there is.
                  Probably like Holmgren, then. For a while there in Seattle he had the whole package including head coach and general manager, just like Shannahan. When he was experiencing failure, however, he decided to relinquish his duties as general manager. Since then the team has experienced a higher level of success. Due to the GM change? Maybe. Holmgren did find Hassleback and Alexander, I believe Walter Jones and Steve Hutchinson as well. Hutch was let go to the Vikings by new management and the run game has thus suffered. But regardless, "the other Mike" has talent and knows what to do with it.

                  The same should be able to be said Shannahan if Walker can come back healthy and our guys up front have a stronger showing in future seasons. Or at least next season if Nalen and Hamilton do return.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Maharishineo View Post
                    The same should be able to be said Shannahan if Walker can come back healthy and our guys up front have a stronger showing in future seasons. Or at least next season if Nalen and Hamilton do return.
                    yeah.. and hopefully we grab some more talent to help those guys out as well. Hard to tell which is a bigger need, the OL or the DL

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If he can somehow fix the offensive line, I think Shanahan will get the offense humming again.


                      Of course, we still need to do something about the defensive play-calling.
                      "You can't take the sky from me..."
                      ------
                      "You can't shake the Devil's hand and say you're only kidding"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Maharishineo View Post
                        Thanks for the post. We've put up huge chunks of yardage, that's for sure. Unfortunately we lack in the red zone, otherwise he'd have a case for number one on the list. That's where you ask the question: is it play calling or execution?




                        It's got to be both doesn't it?

                        There are definitely plays he cannot call in the red zone because the line doesn't have the size/strength to execute run plays up the middle in goal-to-go situations, for example......

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I honestly speaking after this season have to agree with some of the posters here, saying that Shanahan needs to give up on the personnel side of the organization and stick to just coaching. I think he has made some mistakes with some of his transactions, and alot of this team's problem is poor execution on both sides of the ball and absolutely no consistency. When they are constantly adding and dropping players week in and week out, how can there be any consistency? Think about it this way, say you work in a factory that manufactures a product. Your co-workers that work around you have been there since day one. All of a sudden one day they are laid off, or no longer are working with you and someone new is put in their place. There is now no chemistry that was there before because you have to train this new person the ways of the business. The same goes in this situation. The talent wasn't there (at least on defense, the only question on offense this season besides injuries has been the o-line) for the scheme put in place, so instead of making personnel moves in the off-season that were necessary to build this nucleus on the d-line, they waited pretty much until the pre-season was over to start doing this. I am sorry for going off subject a little but this is just my opinion.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Someone post his Red Zone offense stats when he was a Raider and the past 9 years.

                            Since Mike is suppose the be the 3rd best playcaller in the NFL, im sure those stats are impressive...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by PaperBagBronco View Post
                              Someone post his Red Zone offense stats when he was a Raider and the past 9 years.

                              Since Mike is suppose the be the 3rd best playcaller in the NFL, im sure those stats are impressive...

                              Our red zone offense has been severely hampered by our offensive line, as well as short yardage runs. They just aren't strong enough to move the defenders and the zone blocking, and cut blocks, are less effective when there are more defenders bunched up closer to the line.

                              If the defenders don't have to respect our run as much in the red zone then it makes things much tougher on our passing game.

                              If we can upgrade the offensive line I would bet heavily that his red zone playcalls will seem much improved even when he's still calling basically the same stuff. You need the tools to get the job done.
                              "You can't take the sky from me..."
                              ------
                              "You can't shake the Devil's hand and say you're only kidding"

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