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  • JMcD: I've never been a part of a losing season in my life

    Paige: McD wants defenses' hate
    By Woody Paige
    The Denver Post

    http://www.denverpost.com/broncos/ci_12920144
    "There are things we will do (offensively) that other teams have never done."

    Josh McDaniels is not kidding, boasting, lying, hypothesizing.

    The new head of state for the Broncos is issuing a forewarning, a challenge, a notification, a declaration he firmly believes, to supporters, skeptics, an interloper in his office and, most important, National Football League adversaries.

    McDaniels is serious as a Gottfried von Leibniz calculus problem.

    "The interesting thing is people talk about our offense and kind of stereotype it as this quote spread or shotgun offense, but . . . we definitely will find different ways to make defenses work to get ready for us. (Jacksonville coach) Jack Del Rio said it best two years ago. He said preparing for us (New England) was like preparing for six different offenses. We want to dictate to defenses."

    To a visitor, McDaniels applies the word "we" to describe both the Patriots and the Broncos, which raises the question: "How much of this will be the Patriots' offense and your own offense?"

    The answer is: "I will answer bluntly. I will do anything to help this team win. (Patriots coach Bill Belichick) never discouraged me from doing things I thought would be successful."

    What about the length and breadth of his playbook?

    "It's a library," said McDaniels, who points across the room to a bookcase.

    Standing upright by itself on the top shelf is a book that looks like a condensed (just slightly) version of the Encyclopedia Britannica. Who wrote it — Victor Hugo?

    McDaniels smiles. "We won't use all of it, but we will go into it each week and choose the best plays for that game."

    For instance? He's not talking. But last year's Offensive Scheme Du Jour, popularized by the Dolphins, was the "Wildcat," a direct snap to the running back. Will the Broncos try it?

    "We may, we may not. We're going to practice with it, but I will say this: It won't be our bread and butter."

    On the eve of his first training camp as a head coach, McDaniels is staring at a big-screen flat TV on the wall that is frozen on a play involving the Cincinnati Bengals. The Broncos go to Cincinnati the season-opening Sunday.

    McDaniels, per custom of coaches, will not get into prognostications. "I know it's a cliche, but I just want to be 1-0."

    Although McDaniels claims not to read newspapers, he thinks the intruder, frequently as wrong as a TV weather forecaster, has "predicted that we will five games."

    He is corrected. "You have me confused with someone else. Six, but that's a preliminary guess, based on the schedule. I'll make my final prediction after the third exhibition," which, by chance, will be against the Bears and you-know-who.

    "You can't judge teams on the basis of last year. Schedule strength is a hoax. Coaches, players, owners change. There are so many variables," McDaniels said, sounding like a calculus professor.

    A polite argument ensues. "You have to play at Indianapolis, San Diego, Baltimore, Washington, Kansas City in December when it's always cold and Philadelphia. You've got home games against Dallas, Pittsburgh, the Giants and, yes, New England. You can't tell me those games won't be tough."

    "Another cliche, but every game in the NFL is tough. Last year who thought the Dolphins and the Falcons were going to be as good as they were?

    "All I can tell you is I've never been a part of a losing season in my life — not when I started playing in the seventh grade, not in high school, not in college, not (as an assistant) at Michigan State, not in all my years (eight) in New England. I don't want to put a cap on what we're going to do."

    McDaniels rattles off his principal concerns about the Broncos: "turnovers" — (18 interceptions, 14 fumbles); lack of foes' turnovers — "Way too many times we didn't cause any turnovers" (six interceptions, nine fumble recoveries); drive start — "We were one of the last teams in the league in field position on special teams," and the Broncos "scored only three points all year in the two-minute offense — 17 drives and had one field goal. Do that and you won't win."

    The principal concern outside the organization is about the quarterback position. McDaniels, as coach and by choice, is attached at the hip, literally, with Kyle Orton.

    "It's a tough adjustment coming into our system. Kyle moved here full time and has learned the offense. We threw everything at him. He's watching film, studying all the time. I feel very good about him and Chris (Simms). Kyle's a smart player. He brings leadership, toughness. He has responded to adversity in the past. Teammates say they like him. We're pushing him hard. We're not going to ask him to do things that are not best suited for him.

    "In New England we never asked Tom Brady to become an outside-the-pocket runner. We're not going to handicap him; we're going to help him. We want Kyle to be smart, be accurate and run our system."

    The secondary concern for others is the secondary, the linebackers, the defensive linemen — the defense.

    "We've told our defensive backs we want two things: 'Don't let the ball go over your heads, and if a ball carrier gets to you, tackle him.' "

    In regard to the defensive linemen switching to outside linebacker, McDaniels says: "They know how to go forward. If they have to go backward, we're not going to make them do things they can't."

    And defensive linemen, specifically free-agent tackle Ronnie Fields?

    "With his size and strength, we don't think he will be beat at the line of scrimmage."

    There remains a confusing public and media perception of McDaniels because of all that has transpired since he became the Broncos coach. Is he brash or confident? Is he Belichick Jr. or a brilliant coach with youthful exuberance? Did he make smart or stupid decisions with Jay Cutler, in free agency, with Brandon Marshall, in the draft?

    After three extended interviews with the coach, the third lasting two hours Friday, the observer knows Josh is engaging, self-assured, likable, oft-times funny at his own expense, serious about his profession and goals, an NFL historian, highly intelligent, a dedicated husband and father and a clever, gifted football coach.

    We do not know if he can do things that have been done six times with three coaches (one in his first season) — lead the Broncos to the Super Bowl.

    Woody Paige: 303-954-1095 or [email protected]
    Last edited by jdubv724; 07-27-2009, 01:08 AM. Reason: Forgot the link
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  • #2
    That was one tremendous article for bronco fans

    Everything I read and hear about McD makes me even more confident in him and what he will do for this team.

    Comment


    • #3
      Awesome article. It really sounds like McDaniels knows his stuff. I'm really excited going into next year and seeing what our guys can do with his tutelage.

      Comment


      • #4
        Pretty interesting. I really want to see how Orton will operate this complex offense with so little time to learn so much. The guy is working very hard, we must admit that.
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        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by jdubv724 View Post
          Paige: McD wants defenses' hate
          By Woody Paige
          The Denver Post

          http://www.denverpost.com/broncos/ci_12920144
          "There are things we will do (offensively) that other teams have never done."

          Josh McDaniels is not kidding, boasting, lying, hypothesizing.

          The new head of state for the Broncos is issuing a forewarning, a challenge, a notification, a declaration he firmly believes, to supporters, skeptics, an interloper in his office and, most important, National Football League adversaries.

          McDaniels is serious as a Gottfried von Leibniz calculus problem.

          "The interesting thing is people talk about our offense and kind of stereotype it as this quote spread or shotgun offense, but . . . we definitely will find different ways to make defenses work to get ready for us. (Jacksonville coach) Jack Del Rio said it best two years ago. He said preparing for us (New England) was like preparing for six different offenses. We want to dictate to defenses."

          To a visitor, McDaniels applies the word "we" to describe both the Patriots and the Broncos, which raises the question: "How much of this will be the Patriots' offense and your own offense?"

          The answer is: "I will answer bluntly. I will do anything to help this team win. (Patriots coach Bill Belichick) never discouraged me from doing things I thought would be successful."

          What about the length and breadth of his playbook?

          "It's a library," said McDaniels, who points across the room to a bookcase.

          Standing upright by itself on the top shelf is a book that looks like a condensed (just slightly) version of the Encyclopedia Britannica. Who wrote it — Victor Hugo?

          McDaniels smiles. "We won't use all of it, but we will go into it each week and choose the best plays for that game."

          For instance? He's not talking. But last year's Offensive Scheme Du Jour, popularized by the Dolphins, was the "Wildcat," a direct snap to the running back. Will the Broncos try it?

          "We may, we may not. We're going to practice with it, but I will say this: It won't be our bread and butter."

          On the eve of his first training camp as a head coach, McDaniels is staring at a big-screen flat TV on the wall that is frozen on a play involving the Cincinnati Bengals. The Broncos go to Cincinnati the season-opening Sunday.

          McDaniels, per custom of coaches, will not get into prognostications. "I know it's a cliche, but I just want to be 1-0."

          Although McDaniels claims not to read newspapers, he thinks the intruder, frequently as wrong as a TV weather forecaster, has "predicted that we will five games."

          He is corrected. "You have me confused with someone else. Six, but that's a preliminary guess, based on the schedule. I'll make my final prediction after the third exhibition," which, by chance, will be against the Bears and you-know-who.

          "You can't judge teams on the basis of last year. Schedule strength is a hoax. Coaches, players, owners change. There are so many variables," McDaniels said, sounding like a calculus professor.

          A polite argument ensues. "You have to play at Indianapolis, San Diego, Baltimore, Washington, Kansas City in December when it's always cold and Philadelphia. You've got home games against Dallas, Pittsburgh, the Giants and, yes, New England. You can't tell me those games won't be tough."

          "Another cliche, but every game in the NFL is tough. Last year who thought the Dolphins and the Falcons were going to be as good as they were?

          "All I can tell you is I've never been a part of a losing season in my life — not when I started playing in the seventh grade, not in high school, not in college, not (as an assistant) at Michigan State, not in all my years (eight) in New England. I don't want to put a cap on what we're going to do."

          McDaniels rattles off his principal concerns about the Broncos: "turnovers" — (18 interceptions, 14 fumbles); lack of foes' turnovers — "Way too many times we didn't cause any turnovers" (six interceptions, nine fumble recoveries); drive start — "We were one of the last teams in the league in field position on special teams," and the Broncos "scored only three points all year in the two-minute offense — 17 drives and had one field goal. Do that and you won't win."

          The principal concern outside the organization is about the quarterback position. McDaniels, as coach and by choice, is attached at the hip, literally, with Kyle Orton.

          "It's a tough adjustment coming into our system. Kyle moved here full time and has learned the offense. We threw everything at him. He's watching film, studying all the time. I feel very good about him and Chris (Simms). Kyle's a smart player. He brings leadership, toughness. He has responded to adversity in the past. Teammates say they like him. We're pushing him hard. We're not going to ask him to do things that are not best suited for him.

          "In New England we never asked Tom Brady to become an outside-the-pocket runner. We're not going to handicap him; we're going to help him. We want Kyle to be smart, be accurate and run our system."

          The secondary concern for others is the secondary, the linebackers, the defensive linemen — the defense.

          "We've told our defensive backs we want two things: 'Don't let the ball go over your heads, and if a ball carrier gets to you, tackle him.' "

          In regard to the defensive linemen switching to outside linebacker, McDaniels says: "They know how to go forward. If they have to go backward, we're not going to make them do things they can't."

          And defensive linemen, specifically free-agent tackle Ronnie Fields?

          "With his size and strength, we don't think he will be beat at the line of scrimmage."

          There remains a confusing public and media perception of McDaniels because of all that has transpired since he became the Broncos coach. Is he brash or confident? Is he Belichick Jr. or a brilliant coach with youthful exuberance? Did he make smart or stupid decisions with Jay Cutler, in free agency, with Brandon Marshall, in the draft?

          After three extended interviews with the coach, the third lasting two hours Friday, the observer knows Josh is engaging, self-assured, likable, oft-times funny at his own expense, serious about his profession and goals, an NFL historian, highly intelligent, a dedicated husband and father and a clever, gifted football coach.

          We do not know if he can do things that have been done six times with three coaches (one in his first season) — lead the Broncos to the Super Bowl.

          Woody Paige: 303-954-1095 or [email protected]
          How can people read articles like this and not get behind this guy or atleast give the man a chance. I'm pumped and excited to have him here. He has a vision and he knows what he wants obviously. He comes off as an intellegent young minded coach and I can't wait to see how he incorporate his schemes. No wonder the players are excited to get this season underway. Exception Cutler Marshall no bashing just i know someone will come behind me and say what about Cutler and Marshall. Don't listen to the lies Dukes throw out there either lol. Have a nice day and heres to our new coach.
          :go:

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Broncoyearound View Post
            How can people read articles like this and not get behind this guy or atleast give the man a chance.
            Articles "like this" are pretty standard for this time of year. Every coach in the NFL sits down and if they are expected to win, they say modest things... if they aren't, they say "the sky is the limit with these guys, blah blah blah."

            I'm not "BEHIND" McDaniels because I think he is full of it. I think he doesn't have a clue what he is doing, the locker room isn't confident in him and the decisions he has already made, and the veterans on this team know better than to blindly put faith in a 33-year old rookie coach who just blew up the team and is trying to make us the Pats.

            He has his chance, he is the coach of the Broncos. ANy Bronco fan who is against him is still obviously "giving him a chance" because they are still Bronco fans.

            I think the season will be a bloodbath. I'm on record and stand by my prediction of a 3-13 season, followed by a call for McDaniels' head in the offseason, followed by Bowlen trying to save face by keeping him, followed by another losing season, and McDaniels' exit.

            I have been a Broncos fan all my life, but that is what I honestly THINK is going to happen. I would LOVE to be proven wrong, so save all the "ur not a real fan" nonsense.

            Comment


            • #7
              Someones a grumpy gus. Lighten up man, its a game

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Wolverine83 View Post
                Articles "like this" are pretty standard for this time of year. Every coach in the NFL sits down and if they are expected to win, they say modest things... if they aren't, they say "the sky is the limit with these guys, blah blah blah."

                I'm not "BEHIND" McDaniels because I think he is full of it. I think he doesn't have a clue what he is doing, the locker room isn't confident in him and the decisions he has already made, and the veterans on this team know better than to blindly put faith in a 33-year old rookie coach who just blew up the team and is trying to make us the Pats.

                He has his chance, he is the coach of the Broncos. ANy Bronco fan who is against him is still obviously "giving him a chance" because they are still Bronco fans.

                I think the season will be a bloodbath. I'm on record and stand by my prediction of a 3-13 season, followed by a call for McDaniels' head in the offseason, followed by Bowlen trying to save face by keeping him, followed by another losing season, and McDaniels' exit.

                I have been a Broncos fan all my life, but that is what I honestly THINK is going to happen. I would LOVE to be proven wrong, so save all the "ur not a real fan" nonsense.
                While you're entitled to your opinion on how we'll do this year, do you have some evidence backing up the claim that the locker room has no confidence in him? I've heard nothing but good things about him from the players. Hell even Brandon Marshall who held out of the mandatory OTA's has said the players are buying in to what he's selling.

                Quite frankly unless you're a part of the locker room I dont see how anyone knows how the players feel.
                Last edited by Botan; 07-27-2009, 02:44 AM.
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                Comment


                • #9
                  Paige is as bad as Dukes and Wilcots... not 5 days ago he was shredding our team on around the horn. Why does everyone have to cover their bases so they can't look like a jackass in the long run? I've always liked Woody for his insight and comedic presence, but anymore it seems like these guys get handed a piece of paper and that's their story for the week.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by theMileHighGuy View Post
                    Paige is as bad as Dukes and Wilcots... not 5 days ago he was shredding our team on around the horn. Why does everyone have to cover their bases so they can't look like a jackass in the long run? I've always liked Woody for his insight and comedic presence, but anymore it seems like these guys get handed a piece of paper and that's their story for the week.
                    You're on to something.

                    I have a... "Friend" that does some sports journalism. Not football, but the point remains.

                    Know what he does? He has a checklist. I kid you not.

                    To put it in a football structure, here's what his checklist would look like:

                    Coach's leadership
                    Coach's disconnect from the team
                    Coach's imminent failure
                    Coach's ability to achieve
                    Things the coach overlooked
                    Risks the coach took (Praise)
                    Risks the coach took (Critique)

                    QB:
                    Lack of accuracy
                    Ability to make the play
                    Leadership in the huddle
                    Conflicts among teammates
                    Intelligence
                    Lack of understanding of his role

                    Etc, etc

                    This would literally be his checklist (if he wrote about football). In the off-season he spreads the articles around, but he gets them all done. He covers every topic and makes sure he has one article at least that calls someone out on something, and then at a different time in the season praises that same person for that same character trait.

                    The result is that any time he's wrong he can say, "Yeah, I said that and it was a fair critique, but I also said these other things about him" and then he points out the things he was right about.

                    It's the Nostradamus affect. Make enough predictions and then focus on the ones you're right about. Mitigate anything you were wrong about. Be vague, but be bold enough that you do indeed make some predictions.

                    It's the ability to say "As I said before the start of the season..." at any stage and in any situation.

                    It's a psychological trick that any first year psychology student learns about in his classes.

                    Yeah, he literally has a checklist, and he will literally both critique and praise the same issue in the off-season, being careful not to "directly" contradict himself in the process, but still essentially saying on one hand there's a problem at a given position, and then in another article point out that it's the foundation of the team.

                    Then later in the year, he's always right.

                    "Nostradamus affect."

                    Look it up. It ain't new. I somehow doubt my pal is the only one who does this. He hates it, but he knows he has to do it to compete with other journalists. It's the nature of the beast.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Alastor View Post
                      You're on to something......
                      Really unfortunate. To think I'd trusted/respected the opinions of any analyst over the years is kind of disheartening in this light. I think this is why Chris Berman and Tom Jackson are the best hosts on TV. Even when they're wrong about predictions or picking the weeks' Winners, they always admit defeat, move on, and no one thinks twice about it.

                      I'd like to think that later in the season, and if the Broncos do well, that I might regain some respect for these guys when they come clean over these blogs and tweet garbage. However, I know that'll never happen. If the Broncos are sitting on a winning record mid-season Dukes will be the first one to talk about how much he loves Ryan Clady and 'his boy' Casino Royal. :brick:

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        it seems like some of mcd's quotes were taken verbatim from some of the posters on this forum.

                        I hope he doesnt have his first losing season....but he hasnt done anything in this offseason to give me any confidence in that happening.
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                        Comment


                        • #13
                          He is a chump. Braggadocios people are usually hiding something. In this case he is hiding that he is NO WHERE NEAR ready to be a head coach.
                          sigpic
                          RomperRoom McD was an abortion of a hire - Ahead of the curve since 1/12/09

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jakeisthefuture View Post
                            He is a chump. Braggadocios people are usually hiding something. In this case he is hiding that he is NO WHERE NEAR ready to be a head coach.
                            I believe some are frightened off by a confident, honest, caring dude....who has known a life of success based on intelligence, work ethic, and commitment....to himself and those he believes in.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Alastor View Post
                              You're on to something.

                              I have a... "Friend" that does some sports journalism. Not football, but the point remains.

                              Know what he does? He has a checklist. I kid you not.

                              To put it in a football structure, here's what his checklist would look like:

                              Coach's leadership
                              Coach's disconnect from the team
                              Coach's imminent failure
                              Coach's ability to achieve
                              Things the coach overlooked
                              Risks the coach took (Praise)
                              Risks the coach took (Critique)

                              QB:
                              Lack of accuracy
                              Ability to make the play
                              Leadership in the huddle
                              Conflicts among teammates
                              Intelligence
                              Lack of understanding of his role

                              Etc, etc

                              This would literally be his checklist (if he wrote about football). In the off-season he spreads the articles around, but he gets them all done. He covers every topic and makes sure he has one article at least that calls someone out on something, and then at a different time in the season praises that same person for that same character trait.

                              The result is that any time he's wrong he can say, "Yeah, I said that and it was a fair critique, but I also said these other things about him" and then he points out the things he was right about.

                              It's the Nostradamus affect. Make enough predictions and then focus on the ones you're right about. Mitigate anything you were wrong about. Be vague, but be bold enough that you do indeed make some predictions.

                              It's the ability to say "As I said before the start of the season..." at any stage and in any situation.

                              It's a psychological trick that any first year psychology student learns about in his classes.

                              Yeah, he literally has a checklist, and he will literally both critique and praise the same issue in the off-season, being careful not to "directly" contradict himself in the process, but still essentially saying on one hand there's a problem at a given position, and then in another article point out that it's the foundation of the team.

                              Then later in the year, he's always right.

                              "Nostradamus affect."

                              Look it up. It ain't new. I somehow doubt my pal is the only one who does this. He hates it, but he knows he has to do it to compete with other journalists. It's the nature of the beast.
                              :clap: Thank you! Finally some truth to reporting. I never, ever take an article 100% as truth/fact. Its kind of scrambled truth/fact. Anyway, good post. OP, good article.
                              sigpic

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