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  • Power Blocking Vs. Zone Blocking

    ok so i know that denver has always had the zone blocking scheme and i know that its effective in creating running lanes and is also fairly effective in pass blocking.

    what i would like to know is what the power blocking scheme has in diffrence besides bigger linemen.

    can someone help me out in finding out what the better scheme.

    im all for change and i did notice that the ZBS scheme had some issues late into the season.
    (but im assuming that those issues came from the injuries to harris and the sorry play of hocstien and hamilton)
    Now go get your shine box

  • #2
    Originally posted by jc13 View Post
    ok so i know that denver has always had the zone blocking scheme and i know that its effective in creating running lanes and is also fairly effective in pass blocking.

    what i would like to know is what the power blocking scheme has in diffrence besides bigger linemen.

    can someone help me out in finding out what the better scheme.

    im all for change and i did notice that the ZBS scheme had some issues late into the season.
    (but im assuming that those issues came from the injuries to harris and the sorry play of hocstien and hamilton)
    Zone blocking has issues blocking huge Defensive linemen, while a Power blocking scheme has issues with speed rushers. Zone uses smaller but faster linemen, while Power uses Stronger but slower linemen.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by D_Broncs_913 View Post
      Zone blocking has issues blocking huge Defensive linemen, while a Power blocking scheme has issues with speed rushers. Zone uses smaller but faster linemen, while Power uses Stronger but slower linemen.
      so the powerblocking scheme struggles against 4-3 style D's and fast linemen.

      well it seems to work for the patriots most of the time so im down.
      Now go get your shine box

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      • #4
        I'm not entirely sure if I am right , but I think of it as this...

        Power Blocking scheme is more of a Man to Man blocking scheme. This is why you need really big O-Linemen to get a great push off and create holes. This scheme greatly depends on the strength of the Offensive Lineman.

        Zone Blocking Scheme is like a zone coverage on defense. This scheme includes many traps, pulls and other shenanigans. This scheme is for the quick lineman. But them being fast also means that they probably get blown off the line by strong and big D-linemen.

        I would prefer the PBS, but that's just me.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by DenBKumar View Post
          Zone Blocking Scheme is like a zone coverage on defense. This scheme includes many traps, pulls and other shenanigans. This scheme is for the quick lineman. But them being fast also means that they probably get blown off the line by strong and big D-linemen.
          No, bro, this isn't the way it works. The trap, pull and counter are all classic man blocking tricks. The scheme McD wants to run is heavy on the trapping and pulling.

          ZBS basically moves the whole offensive line as a single unit. The OL double team the DL on the play side, then coordinate to ensure one of them splits off to block the LB/S/whoever at the second level. Who stays on the DL and who goes downfield after the initial combo block is a matter of how the D aligns/responds to that lateral shift. The backside guys cut block to take the pursuit out of the play. Basically, you are stretching the D on one side to see how they react - if they overplay to the outside, the RB makes the cutback, otherwise he follows the flow of the play.

          It takes a lot of cooperation, agility and technique to make this work... hence the focus on quicker, disciplined OL in the ZBS.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Warhawk View Post
            No, bro, this isn't the way it works. The trap, pull and counter are all classic man blocking tricks. The scheme McD wants to run is heavy on the trapping and pulling.

            ZBS basically moves the whole offensive line as a single unit. The OL double team the DL on the play side, then coordinate to ensure one of them splits off to block the LB/S/whoever at the second level. Who stays on the DL and who goes downfield after the initial combo block is a matter of how the D aligns/responds to that lateral shift. The backside guys cut block to take the pursuit out of the play. Basically, you are stretching the D on one side to see how they react - if they overplay to the outside, the RB makes the cutback, otherwise he follows the flow of the play.

            It takes a lot of cooperation, agility and technique to make this work... hence the focus on quicker, disciplined OL in the ZBS.
            Thanks for the correction bro. I wasn't entirely sure. Sorry for the wrong info - OP.

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            • #7
              If you have a special breed of both small and quick O-lineman but all with nasty attitudes then zone blocking ends up as the best. The main problem is a lot of teams with bad O-lines resort to it and generally get good production, but when you're in short yardage situations or go up against big physical lines like you see on playoff teams then you get overpowered.

              That's what made our Super Bowl winning teams so special. We ran the zone, but all of our guys were strong with nasty attitudes so they could deal with bruisers.

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              • #8
                accually for Zone blocking, the size doesn´t matter, is just that 300lbs linemen tend to be quicker than 340lbs linemen, we tried that with George Foster(think that was his name, the dude we sent to detroit along with Bell) and according to combines, he should have been quick enough to play in zone blocking system.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by bjoli198 View Post
                  accually for Zone blocking, the size doesn´t matter, is just that 300lbs linemen tend to be quicker than 340lbs linemen, we tried that with George Foster(think that was his name, the dude we sent to detroit along with Bell) and according to combines, he should have been quick enough to play in zone blocking system.
                  Oh, Foster could move when he wanted to. He just didn't want to very often, the lazy t**t. Montrae Holland was also surprisingly quick for a guy his size, but ate his way off the team. Shame.
                  sigpic

                  Elvon Millervil eat grues for breakfast.

                  Pey-Pey to Bey-Bey for the Tey-Dey.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Hoserman117 View Post
                    If you have a special breed of both small and quick O-lineman but all with nasty attitudes then zone blocking ends up as the best. The main problem is a lot of teams with bad O-lines resort to it and generally get good production, but when you're in short yardage situations or go up against big physical lines like you see on playoff teams then you get overpowered.

                    That's what made our Super Bowl winning teams so special. We ran the zone, but all of our guys were strong with nasty attitudes so they could deal with bruisers.
                    One of the problems with the zone blocking scheme in short yardage is saturation. If you have guys who are only suited for zone blocking, it creates a problem because there are so many defenderse crowding the LOS that the numbers make it hard to do a play side double team effectively creating a man blocking scenario. When we initially started the zone blocking, he had to use guys who had functioned in man blocking. So the scenarios where there was LOS saturation wasnt as much of a problem as it would be later when our linemen became purely ZBS. The ZBS is too effective to cast aside but you should focus on linemen who are versatile enough for both.

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                    • #11
                      This is highly simplified but here goes.

                      In the power blocking scheme. lineman are assigned a man to block and the RB is given reads to tell him where to look for a hole. Usually the only help a lineman gets is if he is pulling. So each O-lineman must be physical.

                      In zone blocking, the man at the point of attack can call for help if he feels that he needs it. The lineman at the point of attack and his help step foot to foot to block the D-lineman. As the two of them drive the D-linman back the blockers have their eyes on the LB. After getting the initial push to get the D-linan moving backward, a lineman can peel off the original block. Which ever direction the LB takes dictates which blocker is to peel off and engage the LB. The RB is only allowed one cut to get into any daylight (hole) the he is to run north and south. This ability to get help gives smaller linemen a chance to survive.

                      The stretch play is also an integral part in the ZB scheme. In it the RB has no set hole to attack. The entire line fires off at the identical angle. The frontside blockers are to block whoever is in a position to cross their face. The backside blockers are to cut block any pursuit attempting to follow the play. By cutting down the persuit, the RB cuts into the gap in the pursuit running to daylight which could be clear on the opposite sideline.
                      Dean
                      RIP Darrent & Damien
                      Last edited by Dean; 01-13-2010, 08:53 PM. Reason: typos

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jc13 View Post
                        so the powerblocking scheme struggles against 4-3 style D's and fast linemen.

                        well it seems to work for the patriots most of the time so im down.

                        To HELL with the Patriots, their ways and their coaches cause it and they only work in New England...not in Cleveland...not in New York...not at Notre Dame...not in Denver!


                        ZBS has worked in Denver for 14 years and worked practically every time it was run this year!

                        The power running NEVER worked no matter how many time it was run!!!

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                        • #13
                          In my opinion since the league has cracked down on cut blocks the zone blocking scheme is not as effective.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mel B. View Post
                            To HELL with the Patriots, their ways and their coaches cause it and they only work in New England...not in Cleveland...not in New York...not at Notre Dame...not in Denver!


                            ZBS has worked in Denver for 14 years and worked practically every time it was run this year!

                            The power running NEVER worked no matter how many time it was run!!!

                            I pretty much agree. It took the Broncos about 25 years to have an OL make the Probowl, Keith Bishop in the mid-80s was the first. Some of this forum seem to think all we need to do is switch to a power running game and everything will take care of itself. Funny, the entire Ralston/Miller/Reeves eras we were trying to build an OL, yet some feel it's automatic we'll make the line better...A lot of people on this forum are taking how well Shanny built OLs for granted.


                            The problem with "power running" is that each of your OL has to be better than the DL they are blocking. The OL has to physically move the DL off the line of scrimmage. It may sound simple, but it isn't easy. There's big, strong DLs getting paid millions of dollars not to be moved.

                            With zone blocking, the OL starts moving as a unit and the DL must react. Once the DL starts to move sideways, the OL just needs to screen the DL. The RB picks a hole and goes. With power, there's only one "hole" for the RB to run to.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by DURANGO BRONCO View Post
                              In my opinion since the league has cracked down on cut blocks the zone blocking scheme is not as effective.

                              This is quite true......


                              The difference between zone blocking and man blocking is schematics...



                              Simply put and you can write 1000 post on it, (seems like i have)...



                              Zone blocking you block to a "zone" there is no real Person that any offensive lineman is responsible for you block towards the running lane and hit the first person you see. if a defender is to far away from the play you realease them and persue to the second level toward the hole and hit a backer. There is only two rules to zone blocking #1 block toward the Point of Attack, #2 NEVER let a man cross your face.

                              When you get the entire line flowing to the point of attack, The LB's will follow the flow, and then suddenly the linemen from the opposite side will be in position to "close off the linebackers/linemen" and the cutback lane majicly forms and there's a wall of blockers. That or they're sprung to the next level. You tend to have to hold the block longer (or cut them to the ground) because the back may still be in the backfield, "feeling the hole"

                              Advantages: you can utilize smaller blockers, because you don't really have to "block" you can chip them use angles and maximize your leverage (mostly becuse you are blindsiding LB's because they are staring at the RB/Flow) It's actually REALLY fun to do as a lineman.

                              Disadvantages: If you are using small lineman they are going to get tired running around like track stars. If you have a short down and distance they aren't going to move anyone. If the team you're playing Is fast and stays disciplined the defense will swallow the cutback lane, shed blocks and stuff the hell out of you (hence the sputtering with a 3-4 defense)

                              Denver got a rap for the "cut block" because as the LB's Linemen etc, would trun to flow back towards the lane, the o-linemen would go low. It's the only way they can block them. Linemen were 270, and LB's were 280-290 so you can't run to them and block them hands on with out wearing yourself out. Now that they're having to "engage" it's taking bigger and bigger guys, and if you've got the beef, you're going to Man Block.

                              ZBS is unpredictable, and pretty much caos, since there isn't any real "assignment" It takes a lot of coordination and work to get the o-line all thinking the same way so that everyone isn't flowing to the same guy, and letting others go while flowing to a "zone". It's also those systems where the back has to "feel" the hole, and have great field of vision, because they are going towards and area, but they know at some point in time they are going to have an opportunity to "cutback"

                              Lots of lateral movement, and pretty easy to counter with both speed, and beef, you really have to rely on misdirection, having pass plays work, and getting into the heads of the LB's etc get them second guessing and then attack, but if they start getting you "behind in downs" you're going to be punting...


                              Man Blocking.....

                              Something that people seem to not be able to get through their heads, is that if you have linemen agile and quick enough to trap & Screen they are agile and quick enough to "zone block", however if you have the beef to man block you're not going to wast the time running around, you are going to put your hat on a guy, and move him or occupy him, it's just easier, yet there are certain plays that most every team will "zone block" they just don't have to rely on it.

                              In a "man blocking scheme" every linemen will have a primary responsiblilty, secondary responsiblity etc. depending on the defensive alignment.

                              Trap, forward, lateral the linemen are "sliding" towards a postion picking up a guy blocking them and then maybe releasing to the next level. Put your hat on a guy move him, and go to the next play. A guard might pull and trap the DT on the other side becuse the tackle (or guard) will realse to the next level, the guard will take out the tackle and you've effectively got more blockers than defenders on that side and the first defender that isn't blocked is 6 yards down the field now. The running back knows what hole he is supposed to hit, and runs hard at it.

                              If the guard isn't pulling they could just as easily be flowing to the "zone" on the other side of the line to block the LB, where on film it could look like it was being blocked zone style just by who the linemen's responsibility was.

                              Advangages to having a big blocking line: you can man block, or zone block if you need to, you can get short yardage becuase your line can move people, you are running north and south so the fastest linebackers in the world are now chasing rather than stuffing. Your big line is built to handle the beating of the big d-linemen, and even if the d-linemen is massive you only have to hold your block for 2 seconds because the RB is past you runnning N&S.

                              Disadvantages: You have to find and pay big atletic, smart guys. If you can't find them, you resort to Gimmic's to give you're o-line and advantage (ie zone block)


                              There's a two cent breakdown. Lot's and lots of plays are a combination of both schools of thought.
                              owninit
                              I'm your Huckleberry
                              Last edited by owninit; 01-13-2010, 09:30 AM.

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