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A little blurb on Martindale, Ben McDaniels, and the new O-line coaches

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  • #16
    Originally posted by MindField View Post
    Pees has health concerns, which means Martindale is probably the favorite.

    It's a great opportunity for a young coach, who knows what he can become.

    Rex Ryan spend several years as a positon coach before he finally got the nod in Baltimore (he spend a couple of years under Mike Nolan).

    Martindale has had a variety of experiences, so the DC opportunity makes sense for him.
    I agree with your take on Martindale.

    The thought of there being several assistants with other duties sharing in the coaching of the offensive line concerns me......a lot.
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    Thank you to my grandfather jetrazor for being a veteran of the armed forces!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by MindField View Post
      Pees has health concerns, which means Martindale is probably the favorite.

      It's a great opportunity for a young coach, who knows what he can become.

      Rex Ryan spend several years as a positon coach before he finally got the nod in Baltimore (he spend a couple of years under Mike Nolan).

      Martindale has had a variety of experiences, so the DC opportunity makes sense for him.
      Plus, there would be a semblance of continuity, which I like. I'd be happy with either, but the health concerns are a definate worry.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by PowderAddict View Post
        Plus, there would be a semblance of continuity, which I like. I'd be happy with either, but the health concerns are a definate worry.
        Yeah, can you imagine the heat McDaniels would take if someone fell down dead on the sidelines!?
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        Thank you to my grandfather jetrazor for being a veteran of the armed forces!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Pura Vida View Post
          If Pees doesnt get the job, its because he has some health issues. I think thats part of the reason behind the 'mutual agreement to leave NE. At least that is what they said on the radio.

          Mcd's brother has no real coaching experience and does not deserve to be coaching a position in the nfl at his age. Then again, Mcd had no experience when he got his break at NE, which goes to prove the old addage, its not what you know, but who you know.




          hell- my coaching resume is damn impressive compared to mini mcd.
          Your hate for Josh McDaniels is truly unbelievable. I read the article you posted, so what you are telling me that high School football is not real football? I guess College teams recruit players based off their Madden skills?
          Is that where you got your damn impressive coaching resume?

          But, you are right about one thing, in the real world it is not about what you know but who you blow to get the good jobs. Anyone else would do the same thing with their lil brother.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Al Wilson 4 Mayor View Post
            Yeah, can you imagine the heat McDaniels would take if someone fell down dead on the sidelines!?
            "McDaniels killed him with PURE EVIL!!!"

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            • #21
              Generally speaking, ...

              Originally posted by BroncosTX77 View Post
              Your hate for Josh McDaniels is truly unbelievable. I read the article you posted, so what you are telling me that high School football is not real football? I guess College teams recruit players based off their Madden skills?
              Is that where you got your damn impressive coaching resume?

              But, you are right about one thing, in the real world it is not about what you know but who you blow to get the good jobs. Anyone else would do the same thing with their lil brother.
              ... High School and college coaches end up on different tracks. HS coaches can stay in one locality or state if they wish. Family men sometimes opt for that.

              Many college coaches become like nomads/gypsies in that they move around often. During his career, my cousin coached at Arkansas, Alabama, Montana State, Washington State, Southern Cal., Arkansas, Georgia Tech., Alabama, Missouri, Southern Cal., Memphis (CFL), and Ole Miss. His family life suffered greatly.

              Most pro football coaches started as HS coaches. Some HS coaches go into college coaching. Some college coaches go to pro football. Was Charlie Weis a college football player? How about Mike Leach? Don't think so in either case. Where did they start? HS probably. Leach was recently fired from Texas Tech, but he will reappear. Weis ended up at NE, went to ND and is now in KC.

              During the thirteen years I was an assistant HS football coach, I attended many coaching clinics. I saw presenters from all three levels of football. Coaching is teaching. Effective teaching is communicating. Some of the best presenters I saw were HS coaches. One of the worst was Mike Heimerdinger who was the Broncos' receivers coach at the time. Gene Stallings was pretty good. Steve Spurrier's chalk talk was strange; the Xs were much larger than the Os. I thought he needed bigger players on O.

              JC coaches were pretty good communicators probably because they needed to be with those players who didn't do well enough in HS to be DI. HS coaches were excellent at sharing what they found to be the most effective ways to teach specific techniques. They also know a lot of drills. :salute!:

              The HC I worked under has a vast knowledge of football history. Each drill has a name like Wolverine, which originated at Michigan, or Annapolis. Certain Defensive stunts have names like Longhorn or Tennessee. I think he got wham G (with a pulling G) from Iowa. The "Wildcat" now in use is an adaptation of the Single Wing invented by Glenn "Pop" Warner 100 years ago.

              Some college offenses and defenses originated in HS and some are the other way around. If you watch enough pro football, you'll notice that Xs & Os-wise some of it is basic in it's scheme and execution. It's just that the pros have so many of them.

              Don't put down HS football coaches. They don't recruit. They work with what they have. Head coaches who go to poor high schools without a winning tradition have the opportunity to build something from scratch. Not to mention the somewhat bizarre experience of teaching teenagers, some of whom are special ed., the game of football. Now that's real coaching!
              "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

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              • #22
                Wylie and Barone ...

                Originally posted by Hoserman117 View Post
                Link

                Lots of info in this.
                ... will do a good job. The TE position splits time between OL and receivers, so the position coach is more of a liason kind of guy who facilitates this tweener position. I get the impression that the Broncos want their TEs to be truly tight, i.e., next to the OT.
                "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by samparnell View Post
                  ... will do a good job. The TE position splits time between OL and receivers, so the position coach is more of a liason kind of guy who facilitates this tweener position. I get the impression that the Broncos want their TEs to be truly tight, i.e., next to the OT.
                  Do you really think it will be effective? I wondered if the o-line might not get the specific instruction and direction they need to be effective without their own coach.
                  Last edited by Al Wilson 4 Mayor; 01-23-2010, 10:30 AM. Reason: because I can......
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                  Thank you to my grandfather jetrazor for being a veteran of the armed forces!

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                  • #24
                    Ben McDaniels, an offensive assistant for the Broncos and Josh McDaniels’ younger brother, has been considered for a larger role on the staff as well and is a possibility to replace Barone as tight ends coach.
                    Ahhh...nepotism at its finest.

                    NEPOTISM: favoritism (as in appointment to a job) based on kinship, without regard to merit.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by samparnell View Post
                      ... High School and college coaches end up on different tracks. HS coaches can stay in one locality or state if they wish. Family men sometimes opt for that.

                      Many college coaches become like nomads/gypsies in that they move around often. During his career, my cousin coached at Arkansas, Alabama, Montana State, Washington State, Southern Cal., Arkansas, Georgia Tech., Alabama, Missouri, Southern Cal., Memphis (CFL), and Ole Miss. His family life suffered greatly.

                      Most pro football coaches started as HS coaches. Some HS coaches go into college coaching. Some college coaches go to pro football. Was Charlie Weis a college football player? How about Mike Leach? Don't think so in either case. Where did they start? HS probably. Leach was recently fired from Texas Tech, but he will reappear. Weis ended up at NE, went to ND and is now in KC.

                      During the thirteen years I was an assistant HS football coach, I attended many coaching clinics. I saw presenters from all three levels of football. Coaching is teaching. Effective teaching is communicating. Some of the best presenters I saw were HS coaches. One of the worst was Mike Heimerdinger who was the Broncos' receivers coach at the time. Gene Stallings was pretty good. Steve Spurrier's chalk talk was strange; the Xs were much larger than the Os. I thought he needed bigger players on O.

                      JC coaches were pretty good communicators probably because they needed to be with those players who didn't do well enough in HS to be DI. HS coaches were excellent at sharing what they found to be the most effective ways to teach specific techniques. They also know a lot of drills. :salute!:

                      The HC I worked under has a vast knowledge of football history. Each drill has a name like Wolverine, which originated at Michigan, or Annapolis. Certain Defensive stunts have names like Longhorn or Tennessee. I think he got wham G (with a pulling G) from Iowa. The "Wildcat" now in use is an adaptation of the Single Wing invented by Glenn "Pop" Warner 100 years ago.

                      Some college offenses and defenses originated in HS and some are the other way around. If you watch enough pro football, you'll notice that Xs & Os-wise some of it is basic in it's scheme and execution. It's just that the pros have so many of them.

                      Don't put down HS football coaches. They don't recruit. They work with what they have. Head coaches who go to poor high schools without a winning tradition have the opportunity to build something from scratch. Not to mention the somewhat bizarre experience of teaching teenagers, some of whom are special ed., the game of football. Now that's real coaching!
                      :salute!::salute!::salute!:
                      sigpic

                      Hooray, beer!

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by samparnell View Post
                        ... High School and college coaches end up on different tracks. HS coaches can stay in one locality or state if they wish. Family men sometimes opt for that.

                        Many college coaches become like nomads/gypsies in that they move around often. During his career, my cousin coached at Arkansas, Alabama, Montana State, Washington State, Southern Cal., Arkansas, Georgia Tech., Alabama, Missouri, Southern Cal., Memphis (CFL), and Ole Miss. His family life suffered greatly.

                        Most pro football coaches started as HS coaches. Some HS coaches go into college coaching. Some college coaches go to pro football. Was Charlie Weis a college football player? How about Mike Leach? Don't think so in either case. Where did they start? HS probably. Leach was recently fired from Texas Tech, but he will reappear. Weis ended up at NE, went to ND and is now in KC.

                        During the thirteen years I was an assistant HS football coach, I attended many coaching clinics. I saw presenters from all three levels of football. Coaching is teaching. Effective teaching is communicating. Some of the best presenters I saw were HS coaches. One of the worst was Mike Heimerdinger who was the Broncos' receivers coach at the time. Gene Stallings was pretty good. Steve Spurrier's chalk talk was strange; the Xs were much larger than the Os. I thought he needed bigger players on O.

                        JC coaches were pretty good communicators probably because they needed to be with those players who didn't do well enough in HS to be DI. HS coaches were excellent at sharing what they found to be the most effective ways to teach specific techniques. They also know a lot of drills. :salute!:

                        The HC I worked under has a vast knowledge of football history. Each drill has a name like Wolverine, which originated at Michigan, or Annapolis. Certain Defensive stunts have names like Longhorn or Tennessee. I think he got wham G (with a pulling G) from Iowa. The "Wildcat" now in use is an adaptation of the Single Wing invented by Glenn "Pop" Warner 100 years ago.

                        Some college offenses and defenses originated in HS and some are the other way around. If you watch enough pro football, you'll notice that Xs & Os-wise some of it is basic in it's scheme and execution. It's just that the pros have so many of them.

                        Don't put down HS football coaches. They don't recruit. They work with what they have. Head coaches who go to poor high schools without a winning tradition have the opportunity to build something from scratch. Not to mention the somewhat bizarre experience of teaching teenagers, some of whom are special ed., the game of football. Now that's real coaching!
                        Sam, you inspire me. You always have good insight. Thanks.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by samparnell View Post
                          ... High School and college coaches end up on different tracks. HS coaches can stay in one locality or state if they wish. Family men sometimes opt for that.

                          Many college coaches become like nomads/gypsies in that they move around often. During his career, my cousin coached at Arkansas, Alabama, Montana State, Washington State, Southern Cal., Arkansas, Georgia Tech., Alabama, Missouri, Southern Cal., Memphis (CFL), and Ole Miss. His family life suffered greatly.

                          Most pro football coaches started as HS coaches. Some HS coaches go into college coaching. Some college coaches go to pro football. Was Charlie Weis a college football player? How about Mike Leach? Don't think so in either case. Where did they start? HS probably. Leach was recently fired from Texas Tech, but he will reappear. Weis ended up at NE, went to ND and is now in KC.

                          During the thirteen years I was an assistant HS football coach, I attended many coaching clinics. I saw presenters from all three levels of football. Coaching is teaching. Effective teaching is communicating. Some of the best presenters I saw were HS coaches. One of the worst was Mike Heimerdinger who was the Broncos' receivers coach at the time. Gene Stallings was pretty good. Steve Spurrier's chalk talk was strange; the Xs were much larger than the Os. I thought he needed bigger players on O.

                          JC coaches were pretty good communicators probably because they needed to be with those players who didn't do well enough in HS to be DI. HS coaches were excellent at sharing what they found to be the most effective ways to teach specific techniques. They also know a lot of drills. :salute!:

                          The HC I worked under has a vast knowledge of football history. Each drill has a name like Wolverine, which originated at Michigan, or Annapolis. Certain Defensive stunts have names like Longhorn or Tennessee. I think he got wham G (with a pulling G) from Iowa. The "Wildcat" now in use is an adaptation of the Single Wing invented by Glenn "Pop" Warner 100 years ago.

                          Some college offenses and defenses originated in HS and some are the other way around. If you watch enough pro football, you'll notice that Xs & Os-wise some of it is basic in it's scheme and execution. It's just that the pros have so many of them.

                          Don't put down HS football coaches. They don't recruit. They work with what they have. Head coaches who go to poor high schools without a winning tradition have the opportunity to build something from scratch. Not to mention the somewhat bizarre experience of teaching teenagers, some of whom are special ed., the game of football. Now that's real coaching!
                          That was an excellent post! Basically...you nailed it!

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by BroncosTX77 View Post
                            Your hate for Josh McDaniels is truly unbelievable. I read the article you posted, so what you are telling me that high School football is not real football? I guess College teams recruit players based off their Madden skills?
                            Is that where you got your damn impressive coaching resume?

                            But, you are right about one thing, in the real world it is not about what you know but who you blow to get the good jobs. Anyone else would do the same thing with their lil brother.
                            I have more experience coaching highschool football than mini mcd. Hundreds of coaches in this state do. Non of us are getting opprotunities to coach the TEs for the broncos. It is nepotism, plain and simple. There is no hate involved when acknoweldging a fact. Im not bitter, just pointing out the obvious.
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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by PowderAddict View Post
                              Ben and Josh come from a strong football background, they grew up in Canton and their father is a well respected HS coach. Of course, to find this out does take a slight effort to look up, and the haters can't be bothered with looking up Ben and Josh's background

                              Did you really have to look that up? I thought it was common knowledge.

                              There is nobody that MCD will hire as a free agent, nobody he will draft and no coach he will sign that you won't 'love'.
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