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  • RustyGator
    replied
    Originally posted by KWHIT97 View Post
    I was there and I saw alot of Tebow fans. I thought he did ok for his first NFL game but am curious to see what he could do vs a 1st team, or even 2nd team defense!
    He was also playing with the 3rd team....so it evens out. It was fairly obvious the rest of that offense was 3rd team. But I agree...it will be interesting to see what he does with and against 1st and/or 2nd teamers. Hopefully we'll get a chance to see that this pre-season.

    Glad to see all the Tebow fans. I'm sure that'll be the case at every game. He's got a lot of fans out there.

    Leave a comment:


  • KWHIT97
    replied
    I was there and I saw alot of Tebow fans. I thought he did ok for his first NFL game but am curious to see what he could do vs a 1st team, or even 2nd team defense!

    Leave a comment:


  • atl-bronco
    replied
    How 'bout this one--Broncos PR had to eject a couple of Cincy area "press" from post game locker room--asked for Tebow autographs on passes!
    http://twitter.com/broncos_sacco

    Tebow jogged onto the field to loud boos - those Ohio State and University of Cincinnati fans remember how he demolished their teams in bowl games.

    Tebow noticed.

    "Yeah, I heard it," he said, chuckling. "It got me more excited to go out there and play."
    http://nbcsports.msnbc.com/id/38717949/ns/sports-nfl/

    The sequence may explain the bloody scratches and bruises on the left side of Tebow’s hip and back. Asked how hard he was hit, Tebow said, “Not as hard as the feeling of having a fumble, that’s for sure.”
    http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/D...-be-successful

    Tebow said something emphatically in the huddle - his head bobbed as he talked. Then, he completed a 5-yard pass on a rollout.

    He didn't do much until the final drive, which ended with that throwback scramble for a touchdown. He ran over Hebert, leaving an orange mouth guard lying on the field and Hebert woozy on the ground.
    http://nbcsports.msnbc.com/id/38717949/ns/sports-nfl/

    Leave a comment:


  • False Start
    replied
    Originally posted by stuckinjax View Post
    the boos were because his last game as a Gator was the Sugar Bowl blowout against Cincinatti...he was also known to give Ohio State fits on occasion
    Thank you. :thumb:

    Leave a comment:


  • stuckinjax
    replied
    the boos were because his last game as a Gator was the Sugar Bowl blowout against Cincinatti...he was also known to give Ohio State fits on occasion

    Leave a comment:


  • False Start
    replied
    I'm not too surprised he was cheered when he came out as he is an All American Boy type. Popular everywhere.

    But why the Boos?

    Leave a comment:


  • Broncos&Bucks
    replied
    Bunch of guys in the bathroom were talking about how he doesnt get in trouble how hes good for the nfl and how they'd like to see him succeed...they were all wearing Bengals jerseys..

    Leave a comment:


  • Alastor
    replied
    Originally posted by rocks View Post
    Oh I know. I didn't mean for it to come off like that.

    The writer says it's a no-no for writers / photographers to get autographs. I'm wondering how often that happens.
    It is a HUGE no-no.

    The solution here is simple though. The problem is that some of the players, and the NFL, make money off the signatures, so they don't want a solution.

    At Mile High, we used to just wait by the players' cars to get autographs. Then we got Infestco at Mile High, and now they're roped off.

    We had a fan fair. It used to be two full days. Then it was 1. This year... It was none.

    Even at the stadium practice this season, not all the players were signing things, and almost none did for very long. 10 minutes or so, tops. Orton and Tebow were out there the longest. Orton was the first one out and Tebow was one of the last to leave.

    But that's it. That was the only public opportunity for the fans to get autos this season.

    But the team store sells autographed stuff. A shirt with the right signature can go for $1500 bucks.

    I have no idea what my Tom Jackson jersey is worth to someone who wants it. I wear it though which really pisses the greedy folks off that want to buy it from me and resell it. They get truly pissed when I smoke a cigarette while wearing it.

    It's mine you bastards!

    Imagine if they realized my T-shirt was signed by Elway and my hat by Stokley. AND I SLEEP IN THEM HAHAHAHAHAHA!

    Eat it, money-grubbers!

    Ahem.

    Anyway... The NFL and the players make money off those autographs. That's why they're tightly controlled. The more autographs of a player there are out there, the less they're worth (with a couple of exceptions).

    The NFL is taking steps that at least to my observation seemed specifically intended to ween the public off of the autograph habit so that the only place we can get them is at the store or at special functions we have paid to attend.



    Anyway, the solution is pretty simple. The problem is that none of the people that could implement the solution actually want to solve the problem. The worse the problem is, the more money they make.

    Leave a comment:


  • TebowGal15
    replied
    At the games last night, everywhere I turned I saw a Tebow fan. They were either wearing a Tebow Broncos jersey or a Tebow Gators jersey. It was amazing!

    Leave a comment:


  • MH Stampede
    replied
    I agree that the media in this country is headed the wrong direction. It isn't just sports media either, it is in the news coverage too.

    The media just isn't what it used to be, and isn't to be trusted to tell the truth with any objectivity. On just about anything.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jay3
    replied
    Originally posted by WhoDeyBengals View Post
    Pajama bloggers typically aren't granted media passes to events like professional football games.
    My point is that these rigid distinctions are breaking down somewhat, with a lot of yahoos getting counted as journalists.

    I don'tactually think the were guys with their own blogs wearing pajamas. That was derogatory. But I think some of these web outlets are kind of sketchy, with standards breaking down.

    Leave a comment:


  • y2cragie
    replied
    I do a fair bit of photography here in the UK with the lower leagues of football (soccer) My uncle works as a commentator for the major sports network here, sky sports which enables him to get me my press passes.. It's a number 1 rule that you do not ask players for autographs. There becomes an exception in this case if you know the players well, ( my uncles been doing the job a long time, he knows a lot of the players and managers well) and you ask them after the business of press work is completed. You certainly though dont go and ask someone you are not familliar with.

    Leave a comment:


  • Spice 1
    replied
    Originally posted by MoXplant View Post
    The problem is the media taking advanatge of their position (access to players) for personal gain - not with Tebow providing the autographs.

    The NFL needs to enact some rules changes to where 'media professionals' given access to players cannot request 'tangables' from the players.

    "Hey Tim, can I have that sweaty hand towel?" Is not ok....

    They are there to gather informaton and report - not gather things they will one day be selling on Ebay...
    This is legit. Good post. I'm not a big fan of being objective to the point of censorship. Every sports writer has a favorite team, and MOST of the them remain objective in their writing. God forbid anyone find out that you are a Tim Tebow fan while covering a game that he played in. It seems to me that people are kidding themselves here. We act like there is no bias whatsoever in sports writing, and any exhibition of favoritism while performing research should be cause for condemnation. I think that's bs truly. To me, that just sounds like an excuse to use when you don't agree with what the writer says. "Oh he's a Tebow fan, so this article is biased." On the other hand, what MoXplant said makes perfect sense. These guys should be held to a certain level of professionalism, and should not be taking advantage of their position. From this angle, I agree completely. You're a sports writer, not a little kid getting autographs or a dirt bag profiteering.

    Leave a comment:


  • MoXplant
    replied
    Tebow has a LOT of Fans.... In Cinci

    I like to see how folks from the other side read our team/players after a game.

    To the credit of the Cinci posters they aren't oozing pure hatred for Tim - in fact it appears they would love to have him...

    http://boards.bengals.com/showthread.php?t=69114

    I like this kid, and I do believe he has a future here - IF he can beat KO out - they way he played last night, no small order...

    Denver will be a much better place for the competition - I do believe KO's work ethic and professionalism are understated and ignored if anything. Ko8 will rise to the challenge, and may the best man win.

    Leave a comment:


  • WhoDeyBengals
    replied
    Originally posted by Jay3 View Post
    Without complete information, my first reaction is that it would be some pajama-bloggers that shouldn't even really be considered journalists. There's a LOT of writing about sports going on these days. Some of the crap is identified as fan-sourced (like the horrible Bleacher Report). But some of it is not and it's barely better.
    Pajama bloggers typically aren't granted media passes to events like professional football games.

    Originally posted by Southstander View Post
    I am willing to be that reporters get autographs for their kids all the time, and that when they do they say it is for their kids when they ask for it. That's why I think this is such an issue, the two reporters where wanting the autographs for themselves.
    I'd bet it doesn't happen as often as you think, and ideally, it shouldn't happen at all. It's a question of journalistic ethics.

    Journalists are granted unprecedented access because of the profession, and using it for personal gain is considered highly unethical. Also, media members shouldn't be starstruck, even if the guy you're sitting across from is a star. It clouds judgment and reveals bias.

    Originally posted by moneymayweather View Post
    Tough to say, but every media person knows going into to that job that you can't do that. Especially nowadays with grownups getting stuff autographed and selling it on ebay.
    This.

    Leave a comment:

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