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The Rule of 26-27-60

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  • The Rule of 26-27-60

    Perhaps we should not be stunned by JaMarcus Russell's utter flop as an NFL quarterback -- low-lighted this week by his arrest for possession of a controlled substance in Alabama.
    But could a simple formula have warned us of Russell's lack of NFL readiness? And Ryan Leaf's and David Carr's and other failed, high-pick quarterbacks?
    Call it the Rule of 26-27-60.
    Here is the gist of it: If an NFL prospect scores at least a 26 on the Wonderlic test, starts at least 27 games in his college career and completes at least 60 percent of his passes, there's a good chance he will succeed at the NFL level.
    There are, of course, exceptions. If NFL general managers always could measure heart, determination and other intangibles, then Tom Brady would not have been drafted in the sixth round.
    But short of breaking down tape, conducting personal interviews and analyzing every number and every snap of every game, remember the Rule of 26-27-60 the next time a hotshot prospect comes down the pike.
    Since 1998, these are some of the NFL quarterbacks who aced all three parts of the Rule of 26-27-60: Peyton Manning, Phillip Rivers, Eli Manning, Drew Brees, Tony Romo, Matt Schaub, Kyle Orton, Kevin Kolb, Matt Ryan, Ryan Fitzpatrick and Matt Stafford.

    Meanwhile, among the once highly-touted prospects who failed at least one part of the formula: Ryan Leaf, Joey Harrington, Michael Vick, Akili Smith, Tim Couch, Daunte Culpepper, David Carr, Vince Young and JaMarcus Russell. There are a few notable exceptions to the rule but only by slight margins. Two-time Super Bowl champ Ben Roethlisberger scored a 25 on the Wonderlic, just one point short of the standard of 26. Jay Cutler -- a mixed-bag thus far in the NFL -- scored exactly a 26 on his Wonderlic and had the starts, but completed 57 percent of his passes at Vanderbilt. Joe Flacco, who's been to the playoffs in each of his first two seasons, fell short in the starts category.

    How about the quarterback class of 2010? Top pick Sam Bradford aces the rule easily, but the other three high-profile rookie QBs -- the Browns' Colt McCoy, the Broncos' Tim Tebow and the Panthers' Jimmy Clausen -- all fall short on the Wonderlic, although not by much.

    It stands to reason why the Rule of 26-27-60 makes the most sense as a quick guide to NFL quarterbacking success, too.
    The 26 represents the minimum Wonderlic score required to score a passing grade. Consider some of the lower-scoring quarterbacks drafted since 1998 when it comes to the Wonderlic: Vick (who scored a 20), Akili Smith (26), Couch (22), Carr (24), Young (16, first reported as a six) and Russell (24). All of them have been considered at best under-achievers, at worst busts.
    The most notable exceptions to the rule are Brett Favre, who scored a reported 22 on the Wonderlic, and Donovan McNabb, who scored a reported 14.
    The 27 represents the minimum number of starts a quarterbacking draft prospect should have had in college to make the grade. Ask any NFL scout if he would rather have 12 games to grade or 27. Playing a lot of games means more opportunity to hone your craft in the heat of battle and gain confidence in your ability to perform under pressure. That translates well to the next level. Oregon's Akili Smith was drafted in 1999 after making just 11 collegiate starts. He ultimately made just 17 starts in Cincinnati.
    And how many quarterbacks, like Leaf and Russell, have been drafted based on "upside." That is another way of saying a player couldn't complete 60-percent in college. Do you really think he can do it at the next level?
    The exceptions are few. Finding NFL quarterbacks certainly is a science, but it's not rocket science. When in doubt, turn to the Rule of 26-27-60.
    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/201...ule/index.html

    Very interesting article from SportsIllustrated. The rule is obviously not perfect, but the article is still worth the read.

  • #2
    Tebow was below the wonderlick score? Really? What did he major in? I know he basically took PE classes his senior year because he had all of his requirments fulfilled.

    CP for the article
    sigpic

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    • #3
      Originally posted by IA_Broncosfan53 View Post
      Tebow was below the wonderlick score? Really? What did he major in? I know he basically took PE classes his senior year because he had all of his requirments fulfilled.

      CP for the article
      Child and Family Services Major.


      I think he minored in being awesome for the Gator football team...just sayin.:salute!:
      Disclamer: Anything stated by Hippie Guy is meant to be sarcasm and should not be construed as or mistaken for anything serious.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by IA_Broncosfan53 View Post
        Tebow was below the wonderlick score? Really?
        Have you heard the guy speak?

        Don't get me wrong. I don't think you need to be a genius to be a QB in the NFL and I like Tebow. He has a lot of heart and character and he's very talented.

        "Brain surgeon" he is not, however.

        Intelligence and wisdom are not the same thing. Good judgment is different as well. Work ethic, and all the other things are also different. These are all valuable, and in many cases more important than intelligence in the NFL.

        I'm just saying that from an intelligence standpoint...

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        • #5
          Originally posted by IA_Broncosfan53 View Post
          Tebow was below the wonderlick score? Really? What did he major in? I know he basically took PE classes his senior year because he had all of his requirments fulfilled.

          CP for the article
          Keep in mind that the wonderlic is not about football... It is more of an IQ test I think. Marino and Bradshaw scored a 12 I believe obviously that didn't hold them back. I'm sure Tebow's football IQ is well above average.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Hippie Guy View Post
            Child and Family Services Major.


            I think he minored in being awesome for the Gator football team...just sayin.:salute!:
            You have it backwards.

            Originally posted by Den615 View Post
            Keep in mind that the wonderlic is not about football... It is more of an IQ test I think. Marino and Bradshaw scored a 12 I believe obviously that didn't hold them back. I'm sure Tebow's football IQ is well above average.
            That doesn't surprise me one bit.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Den615 View Post
              Keep in mind that the wonderlic is not about football... It is more of an IQ test I think. Marino and Bradshaw scored a 12 I believe obviously that didn't hold them back. I'm sure Tebow's football IQ is well above average.
              Bradshaw blew the test off as ridiculous. I know many of you won't believe me, but he's actually a genius. Like, he really is by definition (as much definition of what one is) a genius.

              Marino I'm not sure about his story. I do know that Bradshaw, despite his TV persona, is actually quite intelligent.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Alastor View Post
                Bradshaw blew the test off as ridiculous. I know many of you won't believe me, but he's actually a genius. Like, he really is by definition (as much definition of what one is) a genius.

                Marino I'm not sure about his story. I do know that Bradshaw, despite his TV persona, is actually quite intelligent.
                How do you know he's a genius?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by I Eat Staples View Post
                  How do you know he's a genius?
                  I've heard it talked about on a couple of different programs before when they talked about him over the years.

                  As an aside, he also has ADHD pretty badly.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Alastor View Post
                    Have you heard the guy speak?

                    Don't get me wrong. I don't think you need to be a genius to be a QB in the NFL and I like Tebow. He has a lot of heart and character and he's very talented.

                    "Brain surgeon" he is not, however.

                    Intelligence and wisdom are not the same thing. Good judgment is different as well. Work ethic, and all the other things are also different. These are all valuable, and in many cases more important than intelligence in the NFL.

                    I'm just saying that from an intelligence standpoint...
                    You have such good points I would assume you know speaking skills and intelligence are different.

                    I use to work with engineers who are pretty much the best in their field and getting new patents every year but put them infront of the company (about 110 people that THEY KNOW lol) and they sound like Tim Tebow.
                    Time to build on the win and grow the team from some solid play higher level of play

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Hadez View Post
                      You have such good points I would assume you know speaking skills and intelligence are different.

                      I use to work with engineers who are pretty much the best in their field and getting new patents every year but put them infront of the company (about 110 people that THEY KNOW lol) and they sound like Tim Tebow.
                      I think there's a difference. When McDaniels first came to Denver you could tell he was not good at public speaking. He was nervous, his voice cracked, he stuttered, he used the wrong words sometimes, but despite that you could tell that he was an intelligent person.

                      There's a difference between their speaking skill and the intelligence behind their words.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Alastor View Post
                        When McDaniels first came to Denver you could tell he was not good at public speaking.
                        Didn't coach get coached on public speaking because he knew it wasn't his strong suit?

                        I remember reading somewhere that he got a speaking coach to help him do pressers and such.
                        Disclamer: Anything stated by Hippie Guy is meant to be sarcasm and should not be construed as or mistaken for anything serious.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Hippie Guy View Post
                          Didn't coach get coached on public speaking because he knew it wasn't his strong suit?

                          I remember reading somewhere that he got a speaking coach to help him do pressers and such.
                          I seem to recall that too, but I can't be certain.


                          Here's another interesting tid-bit about Terry Bradshaw that I just found, since I'm searching around for proof that people have said he was very intelligent.

                          Turns out that in addition to ADHD he also suffers from Clinical Depression.

                          On top of those two traits, he also has severe Social Anxiety Disorder, which is why he missed Art Rooney's funeral (crowds) and never once stepped foot back in Three Rivers Stadium before it was torn down.

                          He has since appeared in Pittsburgh on two other occasions, but apparently only when being dragged kicking and screaming because he is absolutely terrified of the crowds.

                          It turns out that he would often wind up curled up in the fetal position and crying uncontrollably after games in the past, even if he won, because of the anxiety of the crowds at the stadium.

                          There's a bit more to Bradshaw than meets the eye it seems.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Alastor View Post
                            I seem to recall that too, but I can't be certain.


                            Here's another interesting tid-bit about Terry Bradshaw that I just found, since I'm searching around for proof that people have said he was very intelligent.

                            Turns out that in addition to ADHD he also suffers from Clinical Depression.

                            On top of those two traits, he also has severe Social Anxiety Disorder, which is why he missed Art Rooney's funeral (crowds) and never once stepped foot back in Three Rivers Stadium before it was torn down.

                            He has since appeared in Pittsburgh on two other occasions, but apparently only when being dragged kicking and screaming because he is absolutely terrified of the crowds.

                            It turns out that he would often wind up curled up in the fetal position and crying uncontrollably after games in the past, even if he won, because of the anxiety of the crowds at the stadium.

                            There's a bit more to Bradshaw than meets the eye it seems.
                            Hasnt he handed out the Lombardi multiple times? (including Super Bowl XXXIII vs. Atlanta) That must have been very hard for him...and not just because he said Elway would never win a Super Bowl

                            Thanks for the info Al, I never would have guessed any of that

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Alastor View Post
                              Bradshaw blew the test off as ridiculous. I know many of you won't believe me, but he's actually a genius. Like, he really is by definition (as much definition of what one is) a genius.
                              Yes but have you heard him speak?

                              In all seriousness, IQ tests (which is all the Wonderlic is) are ridiculous. They measure a very limited aspect of an individual's overall intelligence. The best one can take from a Wonderlic score is possible correlation to overall cognitive function.

                              All one can conclude when listening to Tebow speak is that his speech centers aren't as well developed as some. One can most definitely not conclude his intelligence in other areas based off it.
                              Only fools bet against Tim Tebow.

                              Team Tebow #108

                              Yards, without points, mean nothing.

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