Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The "Backbone" Players

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by broncos SB2010 View Post
    DOOM isn't really a leader of the team. They even asked him about it in an interview and says he would rather be quiet and let his play be an example. I remember when the Giants won the SB against the Pats, It was 4th quarter, down by 4 and Strahan was marching up and down the sideline telling his team all they needed was 7 and they would win 17-14. That is the type of players they need. I don't think DOOM is there yet, by his own words. He does consistantly play hard and is a good example. That is all well and good but I don't think that is being a true leader who inspires others. One of the young guys I can see stepping up into that role, if he makes the team, () is Eric Olsen. He is a fiery player who can step up and be one of those leaders that can fill that role when the older players are gone. Unfortunately, he may not be a starter and it is much harder to lead from the bench.
    You are so right......Strahan was a backbone player......that call in the SB is legendary. Many players would have lost their nerve, but he made it clear that the Giants had a great shot to win. That was so inspiring!

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by broncos SB2010 View Post
      DOOM isn't really a leader of the team. They even asked him about it in an interview and says he would rather be quiet and let his play be an example. I remember when the Giants won the SB against the Pats, It was 4th quarter, down by 4 and Strahan was marching up and down the sideline telling his team all they needed was 7 and they would win 17-14. That is the type of players they need. I don't think DOOM is there yet, by his own words. He does consistantly play hard and is a good example. That is all well and good but I don't think that is being a true leader who inspires others. One of the young guys I can see stepping up into that role, if he makes the team, () is Eric Olsen. He is a fiery player who can step up and be one of those leaders that can fill that role when the older players are gone. Unfortunately, he may not be a starter and it is much harder to lead from the bench.
      Well first off we are not talking about leaders.... The term used was "Backbone" players.
      Secondly.... I am a Marine. I think that Doom is the exact example of a leader. "Dont tell me...Show me" This is something that leaders live by. Champ is another example of this. his leadership is between the white line. He lets his play lead. Now can Doom be the fiery type? I am not sure and no one will know until we actually play a big game and we need to get something done. that is when the leader step up and do what has to be done...ie Strahan in the SB...

      But Doom is every bit a leader, just cause he chooses not to do it on a soap box...Doesn't make him any less of one
      Thanx Blondie79 for the sweet Sig....Love it and I will rock it with pridesigpic

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by CanDB View Post
        Every good team has what I would describe as "backbone" players......they are the guys who you count on, who never quit and who give you confidence each and every week, knowing they will lead the team in the right direction. Over the years we've had our share........too many to list for that matter, but when we were in those SB winning years it was Elway, Rod, TD, McCaffrey on Offense alone that made us feel we were in good shape going into each game.

        If you look at other teams....many are QBs (Brees, Manning, Brady) and offensive studs, whereas the Ravens have relied on Ray for many years.

        A few years back, I did have Jay and Brandon on that list, along with Champ and DJ, for example. Last year, the pickings were average.....Dawk brought that quality over, and Doom was there each game, as was good ole Champ, DJ and Clady for sure.

        So......I am talking about guys who can lead, guys who can play, guys who are charged up to win. In that regard, I believe we are starting to see more of those "characters" hanging out in Orange & Blue......we still have Champ, Dawk, DJ, Doom and Clady. But I believe the presence of another seasoned pro - Jamal W, will make a significant confidence impact, as well as a young Mr. Tebow, who adds another player of that description into the fold. You know, someone that keeps the energy level up on the field and on the sideline. I also see some of our other young men stepping up soon......maybe not as vocal leaders, but those who set the right example. Maybe Moreno will be there this year. But I can see Thomas or Decker or possibly one of the oliners emerging as well. Hey, Orton does have some of those qualities, and I'm sure the team backs him.

        Overall, the list is growing again, like it did in the glory years (again, I know I left out a ton of names that should be on the list, including many great defensive players - Gradishar, Atwater, Wilson, etc. etc.). And as that list expands, I believe the results get better. Each week you gain confidence, knowing you have those special guys all around you, who will not lose without a scrap. I remember playing on teams with "those guys", and I always felt like we had a chance, because they were there.....
        Nice post. I've always felt that every really good team has a few "deciders" - guys who repeatedly break open a deadlocked game in their team's favor or make the play that triggers a comeback. Given the narrow margin that usually decides games, these are the guys you want at key positions on the team. I'm not talking about talent. This is a different quality. 90% of players play along with the flow of the game - they play well when the momentum is up and poorly when the momentum is low. The guys I'm talking about change momentum in their team's favor.

        Champ Bailey is the definitive "decider". IMO he's the biggest non-QB momentum-changing player in the league along with Larry Fitzgerald. The only QBs I'd put over him are Favre, Manning and Brady (and they touch the ball every snap). The play he made in game 2 of the 2005 season. picking off Brees with the first or second play after halftime (after the Broncos were booed off the field with a 14-3 scoreline) changed the tone, not just of that game, but the season. Not only did his interception in the playoff game later that year against the Patriots caused a 14-point swing but as all Broncos fans were getting a little nervous with the methodical way in which Brady was driving down for the game-tying score, almost everyone had the feeling that the change in momentum would come from Champ.

        Cutler was definitely a momentum-changer too. Not only the 4th quarter game-deciding drives he had here, but the numerous times the team would be down (on the scoreboard and in terms of momentum) after giving up a TD, only to see Cutler drive down the field to put us back in the game was a palpable relief to the D and the team. He is nowhere in Champ's league though, largely because he under-achieved in this department last season with the Bears (that more than his INTs make me question whether he will ever be a consistent top-5 type QB).

        Cutler did have a momentum-changing WR, but it wasn't Marshall IMO. Marshall blew too cold when the going was tough. While he was thrown to more than any other WR, it seemed that in the most clutch of moments Cutler often looked for Royal more than Marshall. The TD and 2-point conversion against SD, the 94-yard strike to trigger the comeback against Cleveland and the game-breaker against the Jets all are evidence of that. Royal IMO is the second-biggest mometum-changer on this team after Champ.

        Finally, the guy who is emerging as an elite game-breaker is Dumervil. He used to get a lot of sacks before too (with the exception of 2008), but last season he not only increased the number of sacks, but got many of them at key moments in games. Locking him up for the long-term was a terrific move by McDaniels and we should see him improve even more in this regard going forward

        I don't see much outside of that. IMO Brandon Stokley is a bigtime momentum-changer, but it looks like he will have a limited role, if that, on the 2010 team (if it were me, there's no way Stokley would be on the bubble while relative bums like Gaffney and Lloyd were assured of spots).

        Clady and Kuper are my favorite players on the team, but by the role of their positions, they can't really be classified as momentum-changers. Dawkins, as terrific as he was, has never really been the guy to break open a game as we saw against the Eagles and the Colts and many othe games in the second half of the season (and IMO that keeps him from being in the league of a Reed, Polamalu and even John Lynch). DJ, as versatile and selfless as he is, is another guy whose play is controlled by the momentum of the game, rather than the other way around.

        Three "deciders" are pretty decent IMO. My concern is that outside of Dumervil, the other two aren't in key positions. There is a lot of hope in our younger players though. I think we might have as many as 4 game-breakers among our draft picks of the last two years

        1. Moreno IMO can be a Tomlinson-type RB and this year and next will show us exactly that

        2. Tebow has shown how he can affect a game throughout his college career. I think he's going to be one of the best QBs in the league, but even if he isn't, he'll still be the guy that can make the clutch play (if McDaniels truly wants a team like the Pats early in the decade, clutch-ness is the most important quality in the QB).

        3. Eric Decker may or may not become the next Eddie Mac, but I do think he can be very Stokley-like in regards to making that key play to open up a game.

        4. Lastly, the guy I see emerging to be a game-breaker on defense is someone whose stock seems to have dropped a bit lately - Alphonso Smith. I don't know if he will ever be the type of elite CB that would justify a first-round pick, but I see him as the guy that comes up with key interceptions at crucial junctures in games.
        Hoping for a defensive-minded head coach and a return to the ZBS on offense. At the very least, no more cheaters for head coach.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by japfaff View Post
          Well first off we are not talking about leaders.... The term used was "Backbone" players.
          Secondly.... I am a Marine. I think that Doom is the exact example of a leader. "Dont tell me...Show me" This is something that leaders live by. Champ is another example of this. his leadership is between the white line. He lets his play lead. Now can Doom be the fiery type? I am not sure and no one will know until we actually play a big game and we need to get something done. that is when the leader step up and do what has to be done...ie Strahan in the SB...

          But Doom is every bit a leader, just cause he chooses not to do it on a soap box...Doesn't make him any less of one
          Completely agree. Vocal leadership has its place, but is frequently overblown by the likes of ESPN trying to Hollywood-ize the game. Stirring sideline speeches look good in movies. In real life, nothing lifts a team more than a big gutsy play against the flow of the game (the effect of a speech, no matter how stirring, wears off if no one DOES anything to change the state of the game). Dumervil or Royal will never look as determined as other, more expressive players will or talk like other, more articulate player will but they provide more plays that inspire and fire up a team.
          Hoping for a defensive-minded head coach and a return to the ZBS on offense. At the very least, no more cheaters for head coach.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by ParkHill-71 View Post
            Oh my goodness....Even tho I was really, reaaaally pissed at him for picking Tebow that high earlier this year, I have to admit that this coach is winning me over somewhat with his attitude and what I think he is trying to build...
            Have to give credit to him as well...
            I have to agree..McD is slowly loosing his haters. Showing us he can turn us into a more cohesive "team" that plays to win with heart and the will to win every down. With out the headliners for 911 or temper tantrums. Even thru all the criticism he is standing with his beliefs and I think he is on the right track and this years Draft is just the start.
            BRONCO FAN FOR LIFE

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by AC1 View Post
              Nice post. I've always felt that every really good team has a few "deciders" - guys who repeatedly break open a deadlocked game in their team's favor or make the play that triggers a comeback. Given the narrow margin that usually decides games, these are the guys you want at key positions on the team. I'm not talking about talent. This is a different quality. 90% of players play along with the flow of the game - they play well when the momentum is up and poorly when the momentum is low. The guys I'm talking about change momentum in their team's favor.

              Champ Bailey is the definitive "decider". IMO he's the biggest non-QB momentum-changing player in the league along with Larry Fitzgerald. The only QBs I'd put over him are Favre, Manning and Brady (and they touch the ball every snap). The play he made in game 2 of the 2005 season. picking off Brees with the first or second play after halftime (after the Broncos were booed off the field with a 14-3 scoreline) changed the tone, not just of that game, but the season. Not only did his interception in the playoff game later that year against the Patriots caused a 14-point swing but as all Broncos fans were getting a little nervous with the methodical way in which Brady was driving down for the game-tying score, almost everyone had the feeling that the change in momentum would come from Champ.

              Cutler was definitely a momentum-changer too. Not only the 4th quarter game-deciding drives he had here, but the numerous times the team would be down (on the scoreboard and in terms of momentum) after giving up a TD, only to see Cutler drive down the field to put us back in the game was a palpable relief to the D and the team. He is nowhere in Champ's league though, largely because he under-achieved in this department last season with the Bears (that more than his INTs make me question whether he will ever be a consistent top-5 type QB).

              Cutler did have a momentum-changing WR, but it wasn't Marshall IMO. Marshall blew too cold when the going was tough. While he was thrown to more than any other WR, it seemed that in the most clutch of moments Cutler often looked for Royal more than Marshall. The TD and 2-point conversion against SD, the 94-yard strike to trigger the comeback against Cleveland and the game-breaker against the Jets all are evidence of that. Royal IMO is the second-biggest mometum-changer on this team after Champ.

              Finally, the guy who is emerging as an elite game-breaker is Dumervil. He used to get a lot of sacks before too (with the exception of 2008), but last season he not only increased the number of sacks, but got many of them at key moments in games. Locking him up for the long-term was a terrific move by McDaniels and we should see him improve even more in this regard going forward

              I don't see much outside of that. IMO Brandon Stokley is a bigtime momentum-changer, but it looks like he will have a limited role, if that, on the 2010 team (if it were me, there's no way Stokley would be on the bubble while relative bums like Gaffney and Lloyd were assured of spots).

              Clady and Kuper are my favorite players on the team, but by the role of their positions, they can't really be classified as momentum-changers. Dawkins, as terrific as he was, has never really been the guy to break open a game as we saw against the Eagles and the Colts and many othe games in the second half of the season (and IMO that keeps him from being in the league of a Reed, Polamalu and even John Lynch). DJ, as versatile and selfless as he is, is another guy whose play is controlled by the momentum of the game, rather than the other way around.

              Three "deciders" are pretty decent IMO. My concern is that outside of Dumervil, the other two aren't in key positions. There is a lot of hope in our younger players though. I think we might have as many as 4 game-breakers among our draft picks of the last two years

              1. Moreno IMO can be a Tomlinson-type RB and this year and next will show us exactly that

              2. Tebow has shown how he can affect a game throughout his college career. I think he's going to be one of the best QBs in the league, but even if he isn't, he'll still be the guy that can make the clutch play (if McDaniels truly wants a team like the Pats early in the decade, clutch-ness is the most important quality in the QB).

              3. Eric Decker may or may not become the next Eddie Mac, but I do think he can be very Stokley-like in regards to making that key play to open up a game.

              4. Lastly, the guy I see emerging to be a game-breaker on defense is someone whose stock seems to have dropped a bit lately - Alphonso Smith. I don't know if he will ever be the type of elite CB that would justify a first-round pick, but I see him as the guy that comes up with key interceptions at crucial junctures in games.
              I find your assessment very interesting, and even though it is a little different than my "backbone" description, it is an excellent post! But the concept is very similar for sure - guys you look towards to make it happen, give you confidence, inspire you, and always make you feel like you have a chance.

              I have been vocal about Jay, but I certainly felt like we had a chance with him on the field. I'll stop there, because for all intensive purposes we are seeing eye to eye on this one, and I appreciate your effort and insight.

              CPs bud......

              :thumb:

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by japfaff View Post
                Well first off we are not talking about leaders.... The term used was "Backbone" players.
                Secondly.... I am a Marine. I think that Doom is the exact example of a leader. "Dont tell me...Show me" This is something that leaders live by. Champ is another example of this. his leadership is between the white line. He lets his play lead. Now can Doom be the fiery type? I am not sure and no one will know until we actually play a big game and we need to get something done. that is when the leader step up and do what has to be done...ie Strahan in the SB...

                But Doom is every bit a leader, just cause he chooses not to do it on a soap box...Doesn't make him any less of one
                Originally posted by AC1 View Post
                Completely agree. Vocal leadership has its place, but is frequently overblown by the likes of ESPN trying to Hollywood-ize the game. Stirring sideline speeches look good in movies. In real life, nothing lifts a team more than a big gutsy play against the flow of the game (the effect of a speech, no matter how stirring, wears off if no one DOES anything to change the state of the game). Dumervil or Royal will never look as determined as other, more expressive players will or talk like other, more articulate player will but they provide more plays that inspire and fire up a team.
                I also agree. A "backbone" player leads by example as well. On our dragon boat team is a big man - Wayne, who never complains, only talks when he has something important to say, and makes you glad that he is on your side. Luv the guy!!! A 'backbone" player.....ABSOLUTELY!!!! Had the fortune to have been around a number of folks like him in my life......

                Comment

                Working...
                X