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Words of Wisdom(Denver Post Article about the consequences of holding out.)

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  • Words of Wisdom(Denver Post Article about the consequences of holding out.)

    This article is a very good read. It puts things into perspective.

    http://www.denverpost.com/broncos/ci_3793861

    Holding out an act of youth
    Humphrey reflects on choices
    By Mike Klis
    Denver Post Staff Writer





    Former Denver running back Bobby Humphrey says he didn't appreciate his time as a Bronco, and fears Ashley Lelie may make the same mistake. (The Associated Press)

    As Ashley Lelie considers what's best for his career, formidable interference may come not from selfishness, greed or stubbornness, but youth.

    Lelie is 26. This isn't exactly the age of introspection, when man fully grasps the brevity of life.

    To the contrary, Lelie, the Broncos' deep-threat receiver, has vowed to give up today and maybe a little bit of tomorrow in return for greater happiness in his future.

    Later in life, when he has built up more years away from the game than in it, there may come a day when Lelie wishes he had the $1.4 million he is risking in lost salary and bonuses by threatening to hold out.

    Now really, do any flower children-turned-CEOs believe Lelie would consider such drastic measures if he were 46 or 56 or even 36 years old, as his receiving mate Rod Smith is approaching?

    "I look back on my time in the NFL and I don't think I appreciated it the way I should have," said former running back Bobby Humphrey, who in 1991 launched the most infamous holdout in Broncos history. "I don't think most players do. It's funny, as long as you're in the picture, you can't see how beautiful the picture is. But now that I'm out of the picture, I can look back and see how gorgeous it was to play football in Denver, Colo., how the fans appreciated the club, how they rallied around the team. It was a great place to play."

    Should Lelie reconsider, there's a decent chance his friendships within the Broncos' locker room would remain unaffected. Players are funny that way. Everybody else may be critical of Lelie for putting his interests above the team, but when it comes to taking on the NFL system, players stick together.

    Jake Plummer and Smith are two Broncos who have publicly supported Lelie while stopping short of commending his action. Outsiders, though, are confused by Lelie's stance.

    It's one thing to protest a contract. Many players have held out for more money, including Shaun Alexander and Hines Ward last year. They returned in time to become the league and Super Bowl MVPs, respectively.

    Lelie's quibble, though, is his demotion from No. 2 to No. 3 receiver. So that there is no misunderstanding, Lelie has it right: The Broncos' master plan for 2006 calls for him to get less playing time after last week's acquisition of former Green Bay Packers receiver Javon Walker, who is expected to sign a new multiyear contract Monday.

    What Lelie doesn't seem to grasp, though, is that master plans are frequently altered.

    "Holding out for playing time, that's kind of far-fetched," Humphrey said. "You can't predict the future when it comes to playing time. You might get injured the first day of training camp. I think his motive for holding out is totally wrong. You don't negotiate whether you're going to be the No. 2 or No. 3 receiver."

    Walker may have been a Pro Bowl receiver in 2004, but he is coming off reconstructive knee surgery that essentially forced him to miss 2005.

    "You don't know if he's going to be the Javon Walker of old," said former Cowboys defensive back Darren Woodson. "And even if he does, Ashley doesn't have any leverage. What team is going to want to take on a guy whose numbers aren't all that great and give up much in return? I think he's in a situation where he's stuck.

    "If I'm Ashley Lelie, I look at it that Rod Smith might be gone after next year, go as hard as I can, and keep my mouth shut and play this year out. The one thing you don't want to be labeled is as another whiny wide receiver."

    Door slammed in his face

    Having rushed for 1,151 and 1,202 yards his first two NFL seasons, Humphrey believed he was worth more than the $550,000 in average salary he had coming to him in years three and four.

    After showing up for training camp in 1991, Humphrey's first task was to notify his superiors - coach Dan Reeves, owner Pat Bowlen and general manager John Beake - that he wanted to rework his contract.

    "When I initially went in, the door was slammed in my face," Humphrey said. "Without a conversation. Don't get me wrong, I'm not accusing or blaming anybody because I did use the wrong approach. It's just that when you're 24 years old, your reaction is to go to the extreme."

    Where Humphrey said he made his mistake was in packing his bags and heading home to Birmingham, Ala. He should have stayed in Denver, he said, and made sure the media and fans knew he was doing all he could to work out a new deal.

    Once he disappeared from sight, Humphrey said it made it easier for the Broncos to put him out of mind. By the time Humphrey ended his holdout in early October, the Broncos, who were 5-11 with him in 1990,




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    were on their way to a 12-4 record without him. His replacement, Gaston Green, was running toward a 1,000-yard season.
    Two years later, Humphrey's NFL career was finished. He has recovered nicely, coaching six years for the Arena 2 football franchise in Birmingham before becoming a sales rep for a large cement company. He is also busy with motivational speaking and helping his wife raise five sports-minded children.

    But here in Broncoland, Humphrey is held up as NFL coda that nothing is more replaceable than players.

    "Bobby was on his way to having a stellar NFL career," Bowlen said. "And then he held out, and that was it. It wasn't our desire to have it turn out that way, but these things usually don't turn out well for the players."

    Holdout with a happy ending

    The most successful holdout in NFL history has to be the Cowboys' Emmitt Smith before the 1993 season.

    Smith was coming off his second consecutive NFL rushing title, the Cowboys had just won their first Super Bowl under the management regime of coach Jimmy Johnson and owner Jerry Jones, and the running back wanted a higher percentage of the team's earnings.

    Training camp ended, though, with Smith and the Cowboys a sizeable $8 million apart in their latest exchange of four-year contract proposals. With Smith holding out, the Cowboys started the season 0-2, getting blown out at rival Washington and losing a Super Bowl rematch to Buffalo 13-10, while the Dallas offense sputtered before its Texas Stadium fans.

    "When it really blew up was after the Buffalo game, (defensive end) Charles Haley came in the locker room and he threw his helmet through the wall," Woodson said. "He did it in front of everybody. Everybody's quiet. And Charles looked at Jerry and Jimmy Johnson and yelled, 'Just pay the guy..."'

    Smith suddenly had more leverage than a prosecuting attorney with a smoking gun. A few days later, the Cowboys satisfied Smith with a four-year, $13.6 million deal. Despite missing the first two games, Smith won his third rushing title and the Super Bowl MVP in 1993. He didn't stop producing until he set the NFL career rushing record with 18,355 yards.

    "Sometimes it's a coin flip," Humphrey said. "Had the Cowboys started off 2-0 and his backup had a couple 100-yard games, I don't think they would have been in such a hurry to bring him back."

    For every successful holdout like Smith, many more unfortunate examples are made of Jamal Anderson, Carl Pickens and Errict Rhett. Even if a player eventually justifies his holdout in subsequent years, ego-bruising defeat is often initially endured.

    Walker held out from the Packers last year in what turned out to be a lost season for him, but he has since found more pay from what appears to be a superior Broncos team.

    Defensive end Trevor Pryce held out from the Broncos' camp in 2000 rather than accept a $31 million contract extension, only to return two weeks later with nothing gained but $70,000 in fines.

    Pryce didn't look so foolish a few months later, though, when the Broncos re-signed him to a team-record $60 million extension. During his contract squabbles with the Broncos, Pryce was represented by Peter Schaffer, whom Lelie hired Saturday as his new agent.

    The task for the Denver-based Schaffer is to help facilitate a trade for Lelie, providing the Broncos want the help. If not, Lelie may be confronting a self-imposed life decision before his time.

    "Now that I've turned 40, to hear people say they remember my first start for Alabama, my first big game with the Denver Broncos, it makes you think, 'Man, I really accomplished something,"' Humphrey said. "I should have been more appreciative when I was there. But when you're in your early 20s, you don't think about those things."

    Staff writer Mike Klis can be reached at 303-820-5440 or [email protected].
    Last edited by Archimedes Owl; 05-07-2006, 12:25 AM.
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  • #2
    great article. can you email it to ashley?
    "Philosophers have hitherto merely interpreted the world in various ways; the point, however, is to change it."--Karl Marx


    "And I tell you this, that you must give an account on judgement day of every idle word you speak. The words you say now reflect your fate then; either you will be justified by them or you will be condemned."--Jesus Christ




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    • #3
      very good article indeed


      [SIZE=1][B]Adopted Bronco:Kenard Lang

      Comment


      • #4
        Don't ya almost have to wonder who in the heck is whispering in Ashley's ear. I

        mean the Broncos tried to trade him and NOBODY wanted him...for the asking price.

        Javon still isn't 100% from what I've read and this is Ashley's contract year and his

        big chance at a fat pay day. Nobody will give him jack next year, if he holds out till

        the last 6 games-then prolly be put on the inactive list.


        The coaches like him and his teammates love him, no other team wants him bad

        enough...what is his problem? Especially seeing how the Broncos don't even have

        an experience pass-catching TE anymore, they might have to go to more I-form,

        3-WR sets in place of the TE. Plus, the Dinger is in place now and he might be

        able to take Ash's game to new heights just as he did with Rod.

        Comment


        • #5
          Like i've said before, what a waste and disappointment. Maybe his new agent will be able to work something out where AL stays. Since he's announced his holdout, I'm sure he's been hard pressed to find any positives with his decision. He must of thought the market would of taken him and given him what he thought he was worth. Holdout or suck it up and play, but please no more preaching to the choir Ash.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hmmm......... before reading the article, I thought Lelie was the only Bronco to ever threaten a holdout .

            I can understand why Lelie wants to be traded ( though I agree with Woodson's take on the matter)........ I don't understand all of the "traitor" and "coward" accusations. By taking a moment to look at the Broncos roster, it should be quite evident that "lifers" like Rod Smith and Tom Nalen are the exception rather than the rule. Not every Broncos draft pick will spend his entire career in Denver......... and.... GASP!!!!........ not every Broncos draft pick will WANT to spend his entire career in Denver .

            Is it OK for the team to want to move on by letting Pryce, Anderson and Putzier go, but TREASON for Lelie to want a fresh start elsewere?? Seems like a double standard to me.............
            My blog : "A new machine" http://dgalemore.blogspot.com




            R.I.P. Darrent Williams 1982-2007

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            • #7
              Is it OK for the team to want to move on by letting Pryce, Anderson and Putzier go, but TREASON for Lelie to want a fresh start elsewere?? Seems like a double standard to me.............
              I can see the point you're making. The club lets players go due to financial reasons, so why can't a player exercise his leverage and try to leave the club for financial reasons.

              But what I don't like about Ashley Lelie wanting to leave the club is his approach. He's coming off as a whining, pouting, temper tantrum throwing, crybaby. He just needs to come to camp and work his butt off for a team that was one step away from the Super Bowl last year. If he puts in a good year, good things will happen for him, either here or somewhere else.

              So I really don't think it's him wanting to leave the Broncos that is causing upset amongst the fans. It's really his (undeserved) sense of entitlement that is upsetting me and other fans.

              I think if he comes to camp and works hard that everything will be forgiven.

              Comment


              • #8
                Does Holding out really pay???

                Hey guys I found this article and I did not know whether to attach it to the recent Lelie threads or make it its own thread... If it is worthy of being a thread then some will reply to it, if it is not it will die... I found the article interesting especially the quotes of other football players from different teams on the Lelie situation and also the hold-outs and if they were successful or not.


                I don't know how many of you remember Bobby Humphrey but he could have been a great running back for Denver but he decided to hold out and Pat Bowlen wrote him off for doing so. That was basically the end of his career and he talks about it in this article.

                One other thing at the end of this article there is some information attached to a picture I cannot figure out to get in here, short of typing it. It gives hold-outs and what people thought of them... Hopefully someone that knows a little more about this can get them in because it would be worth it to attach this to this article.


                http://www.denverpost.com/sports/ci_3793861

                denver broncos
                Holding out an act of youth
                Humphrey reflects on choices
                By Mike Klis
                Denver Post Staff Writer





                Former Denver running back Bobby Humphrey says he didn't appreciate his time as a Bronco, and fears Ashley Lelie may make the same mistake. (The Associated Press)

                As Ashley Lelie considers what's best for his career, formidable interference may come not from selfishness, greed or stubbornness, but youth.

                Lelie is 26. This isn't exactly the age of introspection, when man fully grasps the brevity of life.

                To the contrary, Lelie, the Broncos' deep-threat receiver, has vowed to give up today and maybe a little bit of tomorrow in return for greater happiness in his future.

                Later in life, when he has built up more years away from the game than in it, there may come a day when Lelie wishes he had the $1.4 million he is risking in lost salary and bonuses by threatening to hold out.

                Now really, do any flower children-turned-CEOs believe Lelie would consider such drastic measures if he were 46 or 56 or even 36 years old, as his receiving mate Rod Smith is approaching?

                "I look back on my time in the NFL and I don't think I appreciated it the way I should have," said former running back Bobby Humphrey, who in 1991 launched the most infamous holdout in Broncos history. "I don't think most players do. It's funny, as long as you're in the picture, you can't see how beautiful the picture is. But now that I'm out of the picture, I can look back and see how gorgeous it was to play football in Denver, Colo., how the fans appreciated the club, how they rallied around the team. It was a great place to play."

                Should Lelie reconsider, there's a decent chance his friendships within the Broncos' locker room would remain unaffected. Players are funny that way. Everybody else may be critical of Lelie for putting his interests above the team, but when it comes to taking on the NFL system, players stick together.

                Jake Plummer and Smith are two Broncos who have publicly supported Lelie while stopping short of commending his action. Outsiders, though, are confused by Lelie's stance.

                It's one thing to protest a contract. Many players have held out for more money, including Shaun Alexander and Hines Ward last year. They returned in time to become the league and Super Bowl MVPs, respectively.

                Lelie's quibble, though, is his demotion from No. 2 to No. 3 receiver. So that there is no misunderstanding, Lelie has it right: The Broncos' master plan for 2006 calls for him to get less playing time after last week's acquisition of former Green Bay Packers receiver Javon Walker, who is expected to sign a new multiyear contract Monday.

                What Lelie doesn't seem to grasp, though, is that master plans are frequently altered.

                "Holding out for playing time, that's kind of far-fetched," Humphrey said. "You can't predict the future when it comes to playing time. You might get injured the first day of training camp. I think his motive for holding out is totally wrong. You don't negotiate whether you're going to be the No. 2 or No. 3 receiver."

                Walker may have been a Pro Bowl receiver in 2004, but he is coming off reconstructive knee surgery that essentially forced him to miss 2005.

                "You don't know if he's going to be the Javon Walker of old," said former Cowboys defensive back Darren Woodson. "And even if he does, Ashley doesn't have any leverage. What team is going to want to take on a guy whose numbers aren't all that great and give up much in return? I think he's in a situation where he's stuck.

                "If I'm Ashley Lelie, I look at it that Rod Smith might be gone after next year, go as hard as I can, and keep my mouth shut and play this year out. The one thing you don't want to be labeled is as another whiny wide receiver."

                Door slammed in his face

                Having rushed for 1,151 and 1,202 yards his first two NFL seasons, Humphrey believed he was worth more than the $550,000 in average salary he had coming to him in years three and four.

                After showing up for training camp in 1991, Humphrey's first task was to notify his superiors - coach Dan Reeves, owner Pat Bowlen and general manager John Beake - that he wanted to rework his contract.

                "When I initially went in, the door was slammed in my face," Humphrey said. "Without a conversation. Don't get me wrong, I'm not accusing or blaming anybody because I did use the wrong approach. It's just that when you're 24 years old, your reaction is to go to the extreme."

                Where Humphrey said he made his mistake was in packing his bags and heading home to Birmingham, Ala. He should have stayed in Denver, he said, and made sure the media and fans knew he was doing all he could to work out a new deal.

                Once he disappeared from sight, Humphrey said it made it easier for the Broncos to put him out of mind. By the time Humphrey ended his holdout in early October, the Broncos, who were 5-11 with him in 1990, were on their way to a 12-4 record without him. His replacement, Gaston Green, was running toward a 1,000-yard season.
                Two years later, Humphrey's NFL career was finished. He has recovered nicely, coaching six years for the Arena 2 football franchise in Birmingham before becoming a sales rep for a large cement company. He is also busy with motivational speaking and helping his wife raise five sports-minded children.

                But here in Broncoland, Humphrey is held up as NFL coda that nothing is more replaceable than players.

                "Bobby was on his way to having a stellar NFL career," Bowlen said. "And then he held out, and that was it. It wasn't our desire to have it turn out that way, but these things usually don't turn out well for the players."

                Holdout with a happy ending

                The most successful holdout in NFL history has to be the Cowboys' Emmitt Smith before the 1993 season.

                Smith was coming off his second consecutive NFL rushing title, the Cowboys had just won their first Super Bowl under the management regime of coach Jimmy Johnson and owner Jerry Jones, and the running back wanted a higher percentage of the team's earnings.

                Training camp ended, though, with Smith and the Cowboys a sizeable $8 million apart in their latest exchange of four-year contract proposals. With Smith holding out, the Cowboys started the season 0-2, getting blown out at rival Washington and losing a Super Bowl rematch to Buffalo 13-10, while the Dallas offense sputtered before its Texas Stadium fans.

                "When it really blew up was after the Buffalo game, (defensive end) Charles Haley came in the locker room and he threw his helmet through the wall," Woodson said. "He did it in front of everybody. Everybody's quiet. And Charles looked at Jerry and Jimmy Johnson and yelled, 'Just pay the guy..."'

                Smith suddenly had more leverage than a prosecuting attorney with a smoking gun. A few days later, the Cowboys satisfied Smith with a four-year, $13.6 million deal. Despite missing the first two games, Smith won his third rushing title and the Super Bowl MVP in 1993. He didn't stop producing until he set the NFL career rushing record with 18,355 yards.

                "Sometimes it's a coin flip," Humphrey said. "Had the Cowboys started off 2-0 and his backup had a couple 100-yard games, I don't think they would have been in such a hurry to bring him back."

                For every successful holdout like Smith, many more unfortunate examples are made of Jamal Anderson, Carl Pickens and Errict Rhett. Even if a player eventually justifies his holdout in subsequent years, ego-bruising defeat is often initially endured.

                Walker held out from the Packers last year in what turned out to be a lost season for him, but he has since found more pay from what appears to be a superior Broncos team.

                Defensive end Trevor Pryce held out from the Broncos' camp in 2000 rather than accept a $31 million contract extension, only to return two weeks later with nothing gained but $70,000 in fines.

                Pryce didn't look so foolish a few months later, though, when the Broncos re-signed him to a team-record $60 million extension. During his contract squabbles with the Broncos, Pryce was represented by Peter Schaffer, whom Lelie hired Saturday as his new agent.

                The task for the Denver-based Schaffer is to help facilitate a trade for Lelie, providing the Broncos want the help. If not, Lelie may be confronting a self-imposed life decision before his time.

                "Now that I've turned 40, to hear people say they remember my first start for Alabama, my first big game with the Denver Broncos, it makes you think, 'Man, I really accomplished something,"' Humphrey said. "I should have been more appreciative when I was there. But when you're in your early 20s, you don't think about those things."
                Last edited by broncos4ever; 05-07-2006, 10:05 PM.
                Go Broncos!!! - Hosea 10:12

                Comment


                • #9
                  Corey Simon
                  TO
                  Javon Walker
                  Keyshawn Johnson
                  LaVar Arrington
                  Hines Ward
                  Brian Westbrook
                  Clinton Portis

                  Am I missing anyone else...most likely a very obvious holder-outer (lol)?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I hope Lelie reads this
                    sigpic

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Actually WABronco, I think this is a plea of Bobby Humphrey to Lelie to have second thoughts about holding out because he knows what it did to his carreer and does not want Ashley to do the same thing.
                      Go Broncos!!! - Hosea 10:12

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                      • #12
                        Does holding out really pay???


                        Not until you sign!
                        Emancipate your mind!
                        The People's Poster

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Prodigal19
                          I hope Lelie reads this
                          This is something I hope Lelie reads too. It could change his mind and really help him not to burn a bridge if it is not already burnt.
                          Go Broncos!!! - Hosea 10:12

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Emancipator
                            Does holding out really pay???


                            Not until you sign!
                            Actually Emancipator look at the end of the article that part I could not put in to this message board, none of these people really did very well holding out. As the article also mentions most of the hold-outs whether they get the money or not really don't benefit from the hold-out because of the reputation they develop and then have to live with.

                            Probably many more Bobbie Humphreys out there then Emmit Smith's.
                            Go Broncos!!! - Hosea 10:12

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Well, that's what I wish Ash would do too...play out his deal and then go from there. But, I just can't blame him for wanting more PT in his walk year. Maybe he already knows that he's not going to re-sign with Denver (duh).

                              Bleh, I just don't care anymore...

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