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  • Floyd Little Speaks Out! (Merged)

    Hopefully this will raise the level of attention.

    http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=2666957

    Little: Lack of Broncos in Hall of Fame 'disrespectful'Associated Press


    DENVER -- Toward the end of his career, Floyd Little's name was routinely prefaced with the words "future Hall of Famer.''

    He hasn't shaken it. The former Denver running back is still waiting for an induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

    The only thing is, Little doesn't care anymore. He's not stumping for himself -- as much -- any longer. Little has another cause -- his former team.

    “ The life expectancy of a running back who's played in the NFL is 58. I'm 64. If I go into the Hall, I want to be in while I'm alive and can celebrate. I don't want to be elected posthumously. ”
    — Floyd Little

    "Forget about Floyd Little, the [Hall of Fame] has already forgotten about me,'' he said. "But how do you go to six Super Bowls and only have one representative? That's disrespectful to overlook our players. My concern today is Denver.''

    The only Broncos player in the Hall is quarterback John Elway.

    The Broncos had three players -- running back Terrell Davis, linebacker Randy Gradishar and left tackle Gary Zimmerman -- make the list of the final 25 nominees this past week. The list will be whittled down to 15 in January and a final vote will be taken the day before the Super Bowl to see who gets enshrined.

    Little, who rushed for 6,323 yards and went to three Pro Bowls in his nine-year career, thinks Davis should be a lock. Davis is Denver's all-time leading rusher with 7,607 yards in a career cut short by knee injuries.

    "Terrell was a great player,'' Little said. "The reason why he [might not] get in is because he played for the Broncos. If he played for the New York Giants -- if I played for the New York Giants -- and had these numbers, there would be no question. I think it's horrible we don't have more in there.''

    Denver isn't alone, of course. Some teams have no players -- who've played a majority of their careers for the franchise -- in the Hall (including the Falcons, Ravens, Jaguars and Panthers) and others have only one (Tampa Bay, New Orleans, Cincinnati and Seattle). Chicago has 26.

    Little, who runs a Ford dealership in Seattle, will have to wait at least another season for his opportunity. In August, the Pro Football Hall of Fame's Seniors Committee recommended Cleveland Browns guard Gene Hickerson and Detroit Lions tight end Charlie Sanders as finalists for possible election with the Class of 2007.

    Not that Little pays much attention.

    "I'm done with it,'' said Little, who played for Denver from 1967-75.

    That's to be expected, though.

    "What happens is you get to that point -- you can't care every year or it would drive you nuts,'' said former Oakland Raiders coach and current commentator John Madden, who was inducted last summer. "Floyd was a great player and a Hall of Fame-type guy. I think [he'll get in].''

    Little used to be consumed by not being among the immortals of the game. He wrote letters to the voters saying, "People ask me why I'm not in the Hall of Fame. I've run out of answers. I'm writing to you for an answer.''

    The ones who responded basically said he belonged in, which further irritated him.

    But then he went to Syracuse University last season for a retirement ceremony. The Orange were honoring those football players who wore No. 44 -- players like Ernie Davis, Jim Brown and Little -- by retiring the number. Sitting at a table with Brown, a fan came up to Little and said, "You should be in the Hall of Fame, too.''

    Brown had a chat with his friend.

    "Jim said, 'Look, anyone who's played against you and with you and watched you play knows you're a Hall of Famer,''' Little recalled. "For now, leave it at that.''

    But Little can't. Not with only Elway in the Hall to represent Denver.

    Denver receiver Rod Smith is with Little on his crusade.

    "I didn't realize it until John was inducted that he was the first Broncos player,'' Smith said. "I was shocked. I was like, 'Wait a minute, hold up, with history of Broncos no one else is in? That's a travesty. Guys like Little, Dennis Smith, Karl Mecklenburg, they should be in. A lot of guys should be. That's hard to swallow for me. Hopefully John getting in will open the door.''

    Little hopes so, too.

    "The life expectancy of a running back who's played in the NFL is 58,'' said Little, who just published a book on his time with the Broncos. "I'm 64. If I go into the Hall, I want to be in while I'm alive and can celebrate. I don't want to be elected posthumously.''

    He paused.

    "All the articles used to say future Hall of Famer,'' Little said. "What changed? The answer is I played in Denver. They [voters] don't respect our players. Had I played anywhere else we would not be having this conversation.''

    Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press
    "Oh I Have Slipped The Surly Bonds of Earth... Put Out My Hand And Touched the Face of God"

    -Rest In Peace, Darrent & Damien

  • #2
    Ok, now, perhaps Floyd Little should be in the hall-of-fame, I dont know, I never saw him play.

    But he says if he plays for the NY giants he'd be in?

    Rodney Hampton and Joe Morris are players I did see play, and statiscally, their careers were very similar to those of Floyd Little, yet you will never ever hear talk about them making the Hall of Fame.

    "The Gagne T-shirt jersey comes with a complimentary can of gasoline and a set of matches."

    Comment


    • #3
      Yeah, but I think he has a great point about the lack of Broncos in the HoF. It's a travesty.
      "Oh I Have Slipped The Surly Bonds of Earth... Put Out My Hand And Touched the Face of God"

      -Rest In Peace, Darrent & Damien

      Comment


      • #4
        First of all, does anyone know why the associated press selects who is and isn't in the Hall of Fame? They have nothiing to do with football. I would think there should be an educated NFL commitee that is responsible for such things. The associated press is just a bunch of writers, most of whom don't any more about football than the average fan. Maybe we fans should demand a special NFL commitee. One that could end this power the associate press has over such matters. After all, it shouldn't be a popularity contest!!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by NJBRONCOSFAN
          Ok, now, perhaps Floyd Little should be in the hall-of-fame, I dont know, I never saw him play.

          But he says if he plays for the NY giants he'd be in?

          Rodney Hampton and Joe Morris are players I did see play, and statiscally, their careers were very similar to those of Floyd Little, yet you will never ever hear talk about them making the Hall of Fame.
          Statistically, maybe, but in reality those players didn't have the career Floyd did. It was a different game in Floyd's day and when he retired he was the 9th all-time leading rusher in NFL history...All while playing behind maybe the worst OL in NFL history.

          Here's my basic memory of Floyd: Fake one guy out, run over another, then drag the third guy three yards, just to get back to the line of scrimmage. Floyd Little had more spectacular two yard runs than any RB in history.

          Maybe Floyd's most memorable play: He had fumbled late in a game and was literally fired by coach Lou Saban. But, Floyd refused to leave the game and when the offense got back on the field, Floyd demanded the QB (Tensi?) to throw him the ball, which Floyd turned into a 70+ yard game-winning TD.

          Also, Floyd wore #44 at Syracuse, maybe the most honorable jersey in college football history. His coach called Floyd the best football player he ever coached, which included Jim Brown, who many consider the best football player of all time. Floyd Little was probably the most honored college football player ever to wear a Bronco uniform.

          Also, Floyd was the first #1 draft choice to sign with the Broncos. He could have gone to the NFL (instead of the AFL) and gotten more recognition and played with a better team. But when asked why he chose the Broncos, Floyd said, "Because they need me." It wasn't about money or fame, it was about a great player willing to help a pathetic football team.

          Floyd was the only star we had for many years, and without Floyd it is very likely the owners (the Phipps Brothers) would have likely sold the team or moved them elsewhere.

          He saved this franchise for the city of Denver. Basically, no Floyd Little then, no Denver Broncos now. Nuff said.

          .

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by lvbronx
            Statistically, maybe, but in reality those players didn't have the career Floyd did. It was a different game in Floyd's day and when he retired he was the 9th all-time leading rusher in NFL history...All while playing behind maybe the worst OL in NFL history.

            Here's my basic memory of Floyd: Fake one guy out, run over another, then drag the third guy three yards, just to get back to the line of scrimmage. Floyd Little had more spectacular two yard runs than any RB in history.

            Maybe Floyd's most memorable play: He had fumbled late in a game and was literally fired by coach Lou Saban. But, Floyd refused to leave the game and when the offense got back on the field, Floyd demanded the QB (Tensi?) to throw him the ball, which Floyd turned into a 70+ yard game-winning TD.

            Also, Floyd wore #44 at Syracuse, maybe the most honorable jersey in college football history. His coach called Floyd the best football player he ever coached, which included Jim Brown, who many consider the best football player of all time. Floyd Little was probably the most honored college football player ever to wear a Bronco uniform.

            Also, Floyd was the first #1 draft choice to sign with the Broncos. He could have gone to the NFL (instead of the AFL) and gotten more recognition and played with a better team. But when asked why he chose the Broncos, Floyd said, "Because they need me." It wasn't about money or fame, it was about a great player willing to help a pathetic football team.

            Floyd was the only star we had for many years, and without Floyd it is very likely the owners (the Phipps Brothers) would have likely sold the team or moved them elsewhere.

            He saved this franchise for the city of Denver. Basically, no Floyd Little then, no Denver Broncos now. Nuff said.

            .
            Wow.. Nice history! Thanks!
            "Oh I Have Slipped The Surly Bonds of Earth... Put Out My Hand And Touched the Face of God"

            -Rest In Peace, Darrent & Damien

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by lvbronx
              Statistically, maybe, but in reality those players didn't have the career Floyd did. It was a different game in Floyd's day and when he retired he was the 9th all-time leading rusher in NFL history...All while playing behind maybe the worst OL in NFL history.

              Here's my basic memory of Floyd: Fake one guy out, run over another, then drag the third guy three yards, just to get back to the line of scrimmage. Floyd Little had more spectacular two yard runs than any RB in history.

              Maybe Floyd's most memorable play: He had fumbled late in a game and was literally fired by coach Lou Saban. But, Floyd refused to leave the game and when the offense got back on the field, Floyd demanded the QB (Tensi?) to throw him the ball, which Floyd turned into a 70+ yard game-winning TD.

              Also, Floyd wore #44 at Syracuse, maybe the most honorable jersey in college football history. His coach called Floyd the best football player he ever coached, which included Jim Brown, who many consider the best football player of all time. Floyd Little was probably the most honored college football player ever to wear a Bronco uniform.

              Also, Floyd was the first #1 draft choice to sign with the Broncos. He could have gone to the NFL (instead of the AFL) and gotten more recognition and played with a better team. But when asked why he chose the Broncos, Floyd said, "Because they need me." It wasn't about money or fame, it was about a great player willing to help a pathetic football team.

              Floyd was the only star we had for many years, and without Floyd it is very likely the owners (the Phipps Brothers) would have likely sold the team or moved them elsewhere.

              He saved this franchise for the city of Denver. Basically, no Floyd Little then, no Denver Broncos now. Nuff said.

              .
              wow, owned, just another east coast bias crap with the HOF, cp your way
              sigpic

              Comment


              • #8
                "The reason why he [might not] get in is because he played for the Broncos. "

                About says it all.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Go Floyd LIttle!

                  Speaking the truth...



                  He's absolutely correct.

                  sigpic

                  Sig made by me. Click top sig to view my Graphics Portfolio.

                  There are three things you can expect in life:

                  1. Death
                  2. Taxes
                  3. The Ball Being Picked Off by Champ Bailey

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Lvbronx, thank you for that . . .

                    That was really a touching post. Floyd was my idol back then. I remember an
                    interview that Larry Csonka and Jim Kiick did with a magazine, in which they said
                    Floyd was the best running back of his time. Your comment, "Floyd Little had more
                    spectacular two yard runs than any RB in history," pretty well summed it up. He
                    turned a pathetic doormat of a team into one that could win a game once in a
                    while.

                    Floyd could have taken a middle-of-the-road team and made them a championship
                    contender. Had he been a Raider or Jet . . . one of the juggernauts of that time . . .
                    he would long since have been in the HOF and have been mentioned in the same
                    breath as all the greats. I really believe that.

                    Long live the memory of #44, our first hero, The Franchise.



                    P.S. Jim Brown said it best: "Anyone who's played against you and with you and
                    watched you play knows you're a Hall of Famer." I watched Floyd play. I saw his
                    first game, his last game, and many in between. That is how I know he should be
                    in the Hall of Fame.

                    -----
                    Last edited by topscribe; 11-18-2006, 05:49 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by NJBRONCOSFAN
                      Ok, now, perhaps Floyd Little should be in the hall-of-fame, I dont know, I never saw him play.

                      But he says if he plays for the NY giants he'd be in?

                      Rodney Hampton and Joe Morris are players I did see play, and statiscally, their careers were very similar to those of Floyd Little, yet you will never ever hear talk about them making the Hall of Fame.
                      Trust me. Rodney Hampton and Joe Morris, good as they were, were not the players
                      Floyd Little was. That coming from a person who did see them all.

                      -----

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Little speaks redux

                        Thanks to all the responses about Floyd Little's comments on ESPN. Many were spot on; I couldn't have said it better. Even those who mitigated Little's comments a tad brought up some good points.

                        I would only add that Floyd Little's place in both AFL and NFL history is special, and not unlike guys like Namath or Lance Alworth, both of whom are in the HOF, and rightly so.

                        Like Namath and Alworth, Little DID come to Denver when he could have went elsewhere. Guys like Butkus and Merlin Olson--each drafted by Denver--instead chose the more established NFL. I might have done the same had I been them, but that shows what kind of person Little was.

                        But besides that--character not a primary consdieration when it comes to the Hall of Fame--Little was a consummate warrior. He could play today. He was a productive RB when everybody, and I mean every single living human being on the planet, knew he was the only major scoring threat Denver had. His heart was as big as Cheyenne Mountain.

                        I don't think I'm overstating the fact--and you old-timers can back me up on this--that Floyd Little played on some TERRIBLE Bronco teams, absolutely dreadful.

                        Younger fans who grew up with Elway don't really appreciate this part of Bronco history.

                        I remember when a SINGLE WIN over the Chiefs or Raiders or Chargers in the regular season would be cause for major citywide celebrations. I recall a Bronco win at Mile High over Joe Namath's Jets the year after NY won SB III, and you'd have though we won the championship.

                        I remember when the only thing Denver fans could look forward to, was the chance at throwing cups of beer out of the South Stands at the likes of Hank Stram, Daryl Lamonica, and John Hadl--just before their teams went out and whipped the Broncos by four TDs or more.

                        (I remember these times when guys moan about a three-point loss to Indy as if the sky just collapsed).

                        Yet through all those awful teams, Little remained among pro football's best. I really hope he gets his due. He deserves it.

                        Outstanding work on these posts folks. Thanks.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Floyd Little

                          http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=2666957

                          sorry if its already been posted

                          interesting article

                          "The man of knowledge must be able not only to love his enemies but also to hate his friends."
                          Friedrich Nietzsche

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                          • #14
                            Yes it has. http://forums.denverbroncos.com/showthread.php?t=76254

                            And it already has been merged once.

                            -----

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                            • #15
                              Bump once for Floyd.

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