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  • #76
    He probably should be re-signed. He’s improved this year and this team needs as many decent o-lineman as possible. Even for depth sake. Unfortunately, his price tag is going way up.

    I was a bit surprised when they didn’t pick up his option. I understand he wasn’t looking great, but this team has had o-line depth issues forever. Picking up his option would have been a cheaper strategy in an effort to build depth.
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    • #77
      Of course Bolles should be resigned. It's simply obtuse to say he shouldn't when he's playing at an All-Pro level. And I credit Munchak for the transformation.
      I'm sure everyone here remembers (Hahaha) the Broncos tackle Claudie Minor who looked terrible, initially. And like Bolles, something clicked and Minor went on to a successful career as a Broncos Tackle.
      But I get it. A lot folks are heavily invested, pride and ego-wise, in their incessant determination that Bolles be dumped. It took a while, and it took a coach who knows what he's doing, to completely turn around what appeared to be.a botched high round draft pick.

      Good for Bolles, and good for the Broncos. PAY HIM!

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      • #78
        Originally posted by gtown53 View Post
        Of course Bolles should be resigned. It's simply obtuse to say he shouldn't when he's playing at an All-Pro level. And I credit Munchak for the transformation.
        I'm sure everyone here remembers (Hahaha) the Broncos tackle Claudie Minor who looked terrible, initially. And like Bolles, something clicked and Minor went on to a successful career as a Broncos Tackle.
        But I get it. A lot folks are heavily invested, pride and ego-wise, in their incessant determination that Bolles be dumped. It took a while, and it took a coach who knows what he's doing, to completely turn around what appeared to be.a botched high round draft pick.

        Good for Bolles, and good for the Broncos. PAY HIM!
        One doesn't often see an offensive tackle pull to the opposite TE hole and beyond to lead a RB. DBs wish they never did.
        "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

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        • #79
          Originally posted by samparnell View Post

          One doesn't often see an offensive tackle pull to the opposite TE hole and beyond to lead a RB. DBs wish they never did.
          That play where he crunched the DB!? Tremendous!

          By the way Sam, I was going to ask you if that is something we should hope they continued to implement, pulling of the G, T on running plays. They seemed to have good success with it.
          Personal goals: GOAL WEIGHT = 250lbs
          Weight loss needed for FGW = 120 lbs
          Weight lost so far: - 24 lbs

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          • #80
            Originally posted by gtown53 View Post
            Of course Bolles should be resigned. It's simply obtuse to say he shouldn't when he's playing at an All-Pro level. And I credit Munchak for the transformation.
            I'm sure everyone here remembers (Hahaha) the Broncos tackle Claudie Minor who looked terrible, initially. And like Bolles, something clicked and Minor went on to a successful career as a Broncos Tackle.
            But I get it. A lot folks are heavily invested, pride and ego-wise, in their incessant determination that Bolles be dumped. It took a while, and it took a coach who knows what he's doing, to completely turn around what appeared to be.a botched high round draft pick.

            Good for Bolles, and good for the Broncos. PAY HIM!
            If Bolles gets a Pro Bowl nod I owe this board a huge "I was wrong about Bolles". I also have to give some credit to a few play calls using Bolles's and Risner's strengths. Bolles has always been a good in space run blocker but he was particularly good in the Miami game.

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            • #81
              Originally posted by WYBRONCO View Post

              If Bolles gets a Pro Bowl nod I owe this board a huge "I was wrong about Bolles". I also have to give some credit to a few play calls using Bolles's and Risner's strengths. Bolles has always been a good in space run blocker but he was particularly good in the Miami game.
              Some good posts in this thread about Bolles' play (thx gang), and I commend you for owning up...if so be it. I too was confused about his future, but when I keep reading/hearing about his improved performance, and yes, even pro bowl potential status (whether the source is great or not), I can't help but think we should move on to another topic of need/want......other than giving the guy his deserved positive recognition. Hey, I want a good LT, and I don't expect an elite one. But a good one, at a good price, takes care of that piece of the puzzle.

              A little bit of a "I digress" but does it ever bug you a little that Oliners and Dliners are often spotlighted in games for offsides/encroachment/holding, but unless you know the game, or the analysts are sharp, don't you think the big boys should get more attention when they do good things. Yes, they have to say who got the penalty, but sometimes they look on screen like a criminal of some sort. Lets be real, if anyone has a history notebook about a guy like Bolles, what do you think we are going to hear the next time he gets called for a hold?
              Last edited by CanDB; 11-24-2020, 09:57 AM.

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              • #82
                Originally posted by CanDB View Post

                Some good posts in this thread about Bolles' play (thx gang), and I commend you for owning up...if so be it. I too was confused about his future, but when I keep reading/hearing about his improved performance, and yes, even pro bowl potential status (whether the source is great or not), I can't help but think we should move on to another topic of need/want......other than giving the guy his deserved positive recognition. Hey, I want a good LT, and I don't expect an elite one. But a good one, at a good price, takes care of that piece of the puzzle.

                A little bit of a "I digress" but does it ever bug you a little that Oliners and Dliners are often spotlighted in games for offsides/encroachment/holding, but unless you know the game, or the analysts are sharp, don't you think the big boys should get more attention when they do good things. Yes, they have to say who got the penalty, but sometimes they look on screen like a criminal of some sort. Lets be real, if anyone has a history notebook about a guy like Bolles, what do you think we are going to hear the next time he gets called for a hold?
                Yep, Dan Dierdorf, John Madden and the late Merlin Olsen used to be very complimentary of O-lineman. It is really rare these days.

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                • #83
                  Originally posted by WYBRONCO View Post

                  Yep, Dan Dierdorf, John Madden and the late Merlin Olsen used to be very complimentary of O-lineman. It is really rare these days.
                  I'm no better, I was pretty hard on Bolles up until late last year.

                  But yeah, you see a back go 30 yards thru a gaping hole (and folks rave about his run), and though we do often notice at least one of the Oliners involved (though it may be another one or two who made it happen), the camera just can't wait to focus in on the big guy when he gets caught holding.....something that happens on many, many football plays (some say almost every) in various degrees.

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                  • #84
                    Originally posted by diesel51 View Post

                    That play where he crunched the DB!? Tremendous!

                    By the way Sam, I was going to ask you if that is something we should hope they continued to implement, pulling of the G, T on running plays. They seemed to have good success with it.
                    Most NFL teams use a mix of zone steps and angle blocks in their rushing attack. When Denver went angle blocks, what we saw against Miami was one, two or three O-Linemen pulling to the edge most often at or outside the T hole. Denver was in 12 personnel a lot and used the TEs in their blocking schemes.

                    Lindsay's first big run was with Cushenberry pulling with TE blocks on the outside. The only guy who I didn't see pull was Dotson and since most of the runs were to the right, he was probably down blocking or releasing to the second level. When the run was away from him, he probably scooped or based away. The pullers were kicking out, leading and sealing. Actually saw both Guards pull several times. Haven't seen that in a long time. Lombardi did it a lot; was part of his Sweep Series.

                    We may not see angle blocked plays between the Tackles. Guard hole Trap and Wham are usually run from two back formations. We did see Gordon's first TD on GL run behind the FB, but doubt if we'll see Guard hole Trap. That play is rarely seen at any level anymore. Takes a lot of practice reps to get all that stuff working quick in a tight space without putting the ball on the ground. If Wham can be run to the TE side, it can set up weak side Wham G with a fold block between the G and T. Usually works best against a split front and must be run from 21 or 22 personnel formations.

                    Shurmur, who was a Big Ten O-Lineman, and Mike Munchak know a lot about angle blocked run plays. If they stick with this, we will eventually see Counter (i.e., Counter Gap, Counter Ace, Counter Deuce, Counter Trey) Those who saw SB XXII will recall Counter Trey. It was part of Joe Gibbs' Counter Series which he admitted having stolen from Tom Osborne. Nebraska ran it from the I, but Washington used Single Back with TE/H-Back. Denver's TEs did a good job blocking, so Counter should be easy to work into the game plan.

                    Am a big fan of angle blocked rushing attack because it has the O-Line fire out and hit which they love to do. It challenges the toughness of a defensive front and punishes DBs who come up in run support. Problem is most college FBS teams don't angle block. Most college O-Linemen play in a zone blocked system in which they don't block the read guy, if they run Option. Zone rushing attack tends to challenge the D Front's conditioning more than their toughness. Looks like Munchak has his guys pulling which was great to see. If they can expand on their angle-blocked repertoire, the rushing attack could become a very effective part of a balanced offense as it was against the Phins.
                    "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

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                    • #85
                      Originally posted by WYBRONCO View Post

                      Yep, Dan Dierdorf, John Madden and the late Merlin Olsen used to be very complimentary of O-lineman. It is really rare these days.
                      You may recall the titanic battle between Merlin Olsen and Conrad Dobler.
                      "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

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                      • #86
                        Originally posted by samparnell View Post

                        You may recall the titanic battle between Merlin Olsen and Conrad Dobler.
                        Nope a little before my time. I know that both were really fierce, seems Dobler had a notorious mean streak. I loved Dick Enberg and Merlin Olsen on NBC. That reminds me of my childhood.
                        I am not to young to remember the "Hogs" from D.C. It felt like they ran for 500 yds against us in the Super Bowl.
                        Last edited by WYBRONCO; 11-24-2020, 12:26 PM.

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                        • #87
                          Originally posted by WYBRONCO View Post

                          Nope a little before my time. I know that both were really fierce, seems Dobler had a notorious mean streak. I loved Dick Enberg and Merlin Olsen on NBC. That reminds me of my childhood.
                          I am not to young to remember the "Hogs" from D.C. It felt like they ran for 500 yds against us in the Super Bowl.
                          I am sorry to tell you this, but I was a huge Riggins fan, as well as The Hogs!!

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                          • #88
                            Originally posted by WYBRONCO View Post

                            Nope a little before my time. I know that both were really fierce, seems Dobler had a notorious mean streak. I loved Dick Enberg and Merlin Olsen on NBC. That reminds me of my childhood.
                            I am not to young to remember the "Hogs" from D.C. It felt like they ran for 500 yds against us in the Super Bowl.
                            Merlin Olsen, Utah State
                            Conrad Dobler, WYO

                            Garrett Bolles, Utah
                            Dalton Risner, K-State by way of Wiggins, CO
                            Tim Patrick, Utah
                            Brett Rypien, Boise State
                            Phillip Lindsay, CU
                            Jacob Bobenmoyer, UNC
                            Austin Fort, WYO
                            Mike Purcell, WYO
                            Deyon Sizer, CSU-Pueblo
                            Josh Watson CSU
                            Darrin Paulo, Utah

                            Rocky Mountain guys
                            "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

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                            • #89
                              Originally posted by samparnell View Post

                              Most NFL teams use a mix of zone steps and angle blocks in their rushing attack. When Denver went angle blocks, what we saw against Miami was one, two or three O-Linemen pulling to the edge most often at or outside the T hole. Denver was in 12 personnel a lot and used the TEs in their blocking schemes.

                              Lindsay's first big run was with Cushenberry pulling with TE blocks on the outside. The only guy who I didn't see pull was Dotson and since most of the runs were to the right, he was probably down blocking or releasing to the second level. When the run was away from him, he probably scooped or based away. The pullers were kicking out, leading and sealing. Actually saw both Guards pull several times. Haven't seen that in a long time. Lombardi did it a lot; was part of his Sweep Series.

                              We may not see angle blocked plays between the Tackles. Guard hole Trap and Wham are usually run from two back formations. We did see Gordon's first TD on GL run behind the FB, but doubt if we'll see Guard hole Trap. That play is rarely seen at any level anymore. Takes a lot of practice reps to get all that stuff working quick in a tight space without putting the ball on the ground. If Wham can be run to the TE side, it can set up weak side Wham G with a fold block between the G and T. Usually works best against a split front and must be run from 21 or 22 personnel formations.

                              Shurmur, who was a Big Ten O-Lineman, and Mike Munchak know a lot about angle blocked run plays. If they stick with this, we will eventually see Counter (i.e., Counter Gap, Counter Ace, Counter Deuce, Counter Trey) Those who saw SB XXII will recall Counter Trey. It was part of Joe Gibbs' Counter Series which he admitted having stolen from Tom Osborne. Nebraska ran it from the I, but Washington used Single Back with TE/H-Back. Denver's TEs did a good job blocking, so Counter should be easy to work into the game plan.

                              Am a big fan of angle blocked rushing attack because it has the O-Line fire out and hit which they love to do. It challenges the toughness of a defensive front and punishes DBs who come up in run support. Problem is most college FBS teams don't angle block. Most college O-Linemen play in a zone blocked system in which they don't block the read guy, if they run Option. Zone rushing attack tends to challenge the D Front's conditioning more than their toughness. Looks like Munchak has his guys pulling which was great to see. If they can expand on their angle-blocked repertoire, the rushing attack could become a very effective part of a balanced offense as it was against the Phins.
                              I read an article yesterday or today where Fangio said that the reason they used the run blocking they did against Miami was because they noticed Miami using defensive fronts that were popular in the 60's. So they decided to use a more classic look and get more blockers out in front of the plays.

                              It's mentioned briefly in this article, but they don't have the part about the fronts from the 60's. Oh and before anyone thinks Fangio was talking trash or ripping the Dolphins, after he said that he mentioned the Broncos use some of the same fronts now.

                              https://www.milehighreport.com/2020/...in-loss-record

                              As for Bolles, PFF (take it for what it's worth) now has him as their highest graded offensive tackle for the year.

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                              • #90
                                https://www.denverbroncos.com/news/i...-continue-high

                                'I want to be here for a long time': Resurgent Garett Bolles hopes to continue high level of play in Denver

                                Aric DiLalla

                                "I didn't use it as an excuse," Bolles said of the lack of in-person work. " … I really just took it upon myself to know that there's always something that you can do. You can always run; you can always take sets. … I took sets in my kitchen barefoot so when I get to my proper spot, I know exactly how my weight is between my feet and my toes. I had my wife line up and she would run after me and I would take sets and I'd put my hands on her — not hard of course — but just enough so I can get into a repetition of continuing to do the same thing over and over again. I'd run, I'd hit the bag, I'd get a pole and I'd fit it like I was fitting a run game. I'd do whatever I can to find myself — I was training in California to of course not break COVID rules — but be by myself and go to the park and set up a tree or put cones on the ground and set, something like that. I always found something to do to continue to get my body in shape and get my mind where it needs to be mentally and physically and really dial in what I needed to do. I feel like that is what's paying off now is those little things I did."

                                Bolles said the early in his career, he "just went through the motions" in certain areas of the game, but he's since realized the importance of nutrition, sleep and film study. Those adjustments have helped him find success in Year 4, and he now believes he understands what it takes to be "a franchise left tackle." He has had just one holding call enforced against him this season after leading the league in the penalty over the last three seasons.

                                It's understandable that it took Bolles a bit of time — and consistency — to improve his level of play. The 28-year-old player picked up football late in life before playing collegiately at Snow College and for a year at the University of Utah. Since arriving in Denver, he's started all 58 of the Broncos' games at left tackle, and he is Pro Football Focus' top-rated tackle through 11 weeks.

                                "I needed time," Bolles said. "I'm extremely grateful for [Head] Coach [Vic] Fangio. I know he's talked to you guys about how he's grateful to just let me go in there and learn from my mistakes. A player that hasn't played a lot of football or a rookie that's come into the league, he needs reps. He needs repetition. He needs to see what will be thrown at him. He might not pick it up early on in his career but the longer that he's in there — it's sort of like that [trial] by fire type of thing — you're out there, guys are smoking you and you're falling on the ground and you think to yourself, 'Hey, I can either get up and strap my helmet on more and do it again, or I can take my helmet off and I can walk out the door.' That's really your options. So, over the years I've learned I'm that type of fighter. I might fall in a hole but I'm that type of fighter that's going to climb that ladder and get myself out of the hole. I pride myself on that and I'm going to continue to do that because that's what a father is, that's what a husband is to provide for the family, and that's what a man does for his job that he loves dearly. I'm a fighter. I never give up and I'm just going to continue to do what I need to do to help this team win."



                                "… I've had rocky years here and my goal is just to be a consistent player that [President of Football Operations/General Manager] Mr. [John] Elway and this organization can count on for many years. I want to be here for a long time — I love the city, I love this fan base, my teammates, I love everything about here and I just want to win. So, my motto is to win and do everything I can because if I'm sloppy out there, Drew [Lock] can't throw the ball. If I'm playing my high level that I am, then Drew can move the ball and do his thing. I pride myself with that. If I can continue to play consistent football, then we're going to win games."
                                Last edited by fraguela09; 11-24-2020, 08:36 PM.

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