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  • Originally posted by CanDB View Post

    Otto Graham
    That's right. Thought about making it multiple choice like:

    a. Otto I HRE

    b. Otto von Bismarck

    c. Otto Graham

    d. Otto Skorzeny

    e. Otto Lilienthal

    But, you nailed it!
    "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

    Comment


    • Originally posted by CanDB View Post

      My gut says all of them...???
      Terry Bradshaw called his own plays. Some of his best calls were audibles to runs like the 4th quarter of SB XIII, when they had 3rd & 9 from the +22 after a delay penalty. Bradshaw had called a play in the huddle, but when he came to LOS saw that Landry had his D out of the Flex, so Bradshaw audibled to Tackle Trap and Franco Harris scored putting the Steelers up 28-17 with about seven minutes remaining. They went on to win 35-31.

      Seriously doubt if John Elway called his own plays under Dan Reeves. Reeves was in Tom Landry's coaching tree and Landry exercised control over both sides of the ball, and he had innovations in each. Not sure about Jim Fassel, but I'm inclined to think OCs were pretty much calling the plays by the Nineties. Shanahan and/or Kubiak called the plays in Shanahan's rendition of the WCO.

      Bill Walsh called the plays for Joe Montana in the highly structured and specific WCO with verbose play calls with the first plays of the game scripted. After Walsh retired, that practice continued under Mike Holmgren, a prominent member of Bill Walsh's coaching tree who had been his QB coach.

      As far as I can tell, Don Shula had Dan Marino call the plays as he had done with previous QBs all the way back to Johnny Unitas.

      Some others of interest are Bart Starr who called the plays in Vince Lombardi's low volume, execution-oriented offense, and Otto Graham who called the plays Paul Brown sent in with messenger Guards as Brown was as controlling as Landry or Walsh.



      "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

      Comment


      • Originally posted by CanDB View Post

        Actually I do not believe The Steelers built around Bradshaw. He just blended in with the amazing team that they put together, in every aspect of the game. I believe there were 14 players/coaches/ownership that became HoFamers from that dynasty era. That's incredible!!

        So back to one of my points...whether now or then, you need to stock up with quality players throughout the roster, and not put too much into the QB position. But while saying that, if you are weak in any aspect of the game, having an ordinary QB will likely not lead to success. That's why I get concerned when folks talk about moving up for a QB, given how much that costs in capital, along with the cost of drafting Lock....and the previous QBs going back a few years with no starter outcomes. For me, I have teetered, but I actually prefer we avoid a QB in round one, and select a tier 2 QB, who might be worth the pick and more.

        I essentially worry that too many good non QBs get passed by as we keep searching for the next potential field leader. If you look at that Steelers team, they made incredible draft picks, and they were basically non QBs.
        Early in Bradshaw's career, it was nearly impossible to score on the Steel Curtain Defense. They basically came out and said to the opposing offense, "You aren't going to get any first downs, much less touchdowns and you will finish the game with negative rushing yards." That nearly happened on several occasions. Later on, Bradshaw became more dominant in his own right as signal caller of a potent, balanced offense.
        "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

        Comment


        • Originally posted by samparnell View Post

          Terry Bradshaw called his own plays. Some of his best calls were audibles to runs like the 4th quarter of SB XIII, when they had 3rd & 9 from the +22 after a delay penalty. Bradshaw had called a play in the huddle, but when he came to LOS saw that Landry had his D out of the Flex, so Bradshaw audibled to Tackle Trap and Franco Harris scored putting the Steelers up 28-17 with about seven minutes remaining. They went on to win 35-31.

          Seriously doubt if John Elway called his own plays under Dan Reeves. Reeves was in Tom Landry's coaching tree and Landry exercised control over both sides of the ball, and he had innovations in each. Not sure about Jim Fassel, but I'm inclined to think OCs were pretty much calling the plays by the Nineties. Shanahan and/or Kubiak called the plays in Shanahan's rendition of the WCO.

          Bill Walsh called the plays for Joe Montana in the highly structured and specific WCO with verbose play calls with the first plays of the game scripted. After Walsh retired, that practice continued under Mike Holmgren, a prominent member of Bill Walsh's coaching tree who had been his QB coach.

          As far as I can tell, Don Shula had Dan Marino call the plays as he had done with previous QBs all the way back to Johnny Unitas.

          Some others of interest are Bart Starr who called the plays in Vince Lombardi's low volume, execution-oriented offense, and Otto Graham who called the plays Paul Brown sent in with messenger Guards as Brown was as controlling as Landry or Walsh.


          Yes, Marino did call his own plays. Reeves called them for Elway, except for a short time (a couple of games IIRC). Marino was having a lot more success early in their careers than Elway and Reeves drew criticism for not letting Elway call plays like Shula let Marino. Reeves response was that Elway would have to attend the coaches meetings if he wanted to call plays. Elway tried for a little while but felt there was too much on his plate.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by samparnell View Post

            Terry Bradshaw called his own plays. Some of his best calls were audibles to runs like the 4th quarter of SB XIII, when they had 3rd & 9 from the +22 after a delay penalty. Bradshaw had called a play in the huddle, but when he came to LOS saw that Landry had his D out of the Flex, so Bradshaw audibled to Tackle Trap and Franco Harris scored putting the Steelers up 28-17 with about seven minutes remaining. They went on to win 35-31.

            Seriously doubt if John Elway called his own plays under Dan Reeves. Reeves was in Tom Landry's coaching tree and Landry exercised control over both sides of the ball, and he had innovations in each. Not sure about Jim Fassel, but I'm inclined to think OCs were pretty much calling the plays by the Nineties. Shanahan and/or Kubiak called the plays in Shanahan's rendition of the WCO.

            Bill Walsh called the plays for Joe Montana in the highly structured and specific WCO with verbose play calls with the first plays of the game scripted. After Walsh retired, that practice continued under Mike Holmgren, a prominent member of Bill Walsh's coaching tree who had been his QB coach.

            As far as I can tell, Don Shula had Dan Marino call the plays as he had done with previous QBs all the way back to Johnny Unitas.

            Some others of interest are Bart Starr who called the plays in Vince Lombardi's low volume, execution-oriented offense, and Otto Graham who called the plays Paul Brown sent in with messenger Guards as Brown was as controlling as Landry or Walsh.


            I always remember how they said Walsh scripted the first block of plays. I thought it was a bit unusual at the time, because what if the situation changed enough that the next plays did not make sense. I think they adjusted accordingly. But overall he knew what he was doing, and had a game plan that entailed a specific initial block that he felt would set the tone, and/or help manage the remainder of each game by the way his team was being defended against.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by CanDB View Post

              I always remember how they said Walsh scripted the first block of plays. I thought it was a bit unusual at the time, because what if the situation changed enough that the next plays did not make sense. I think they adjusted accordingly. But overall he knew what he was doing, and had a game plan that entailed a specific initial block that he felt would set the tone, and/or help manage the remainder of each game by the way his team was being defended against.
              Bill Walsh's offense is one of the few major innovations native to the NFL.
              "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

              Comment


              • Originally posted by JvDub95 View Post

                Yeah, nitpicking.....just like how I'm lame for thinking Lock has to have a pro bowl type year to remain here. No matter what I say or think you are going to attack it.

                Why do I need facts and stats and charts to have an opinion??? In years past organizations wouldn't even hardly consider a kid if he didn't either have 4 years as a starter or at least play in a pro style offense. Today, kids with only 1 or 2 years starting experience are getting taken very high and a good percentage of them are having solid early success.
                Good grief....more lame crap. Opinions only count if they have quality value and logical substance. Yours doesn't, IMO.
                Utah Bronco Freak

                Comment


                • Originally posted by samparnell View Post

                  Early in Bradshaw's career, it was nearly impossible to score on the Steel Curtain Defense. They basically came out and said to the opposing offense, "You aren't going to get any first downs, much less touchdowns and you will finish the game with negative rushing yards." That nearly happened on several occasions. Later on, Bradshaw became more dominant in his own right as signal caller of a potent, balanced offense.
                  As I mentioned, look at the talent in that era, on that team:

                  Offence

                  Lynn Swann
                  John Stallworth
                  Franco Harris
                  Mike Webster
                  Terry Bradshaw

                  Defence

                  Mean Joe Green
                  Jack Lambert
                  Jack Ham
                  Mel Bount
                  Donnie Shell

                  There were others who did not make The Hall, but were excellent players. That Dline was formidable - Green, Greenwood, Holmes and White! The LBers were just as scary with Lambert, Ham and Russell (I believe). And then Blount and Shell patrolling the back end. They were a really good backfield, and they must have played with confidence knowing that their front 7 were in attack mode all game. I remember some games, wondering if certain opponents could even move the ball!

                  I was not a fan, but I was in awe of them! Of course it didn't hurt them or Bradshaw on that Immaculate Reception that Tatum deflected into the fingertips of one Franco Harris!!! I will never forget the shock of seeing a game end, until that is, the cameras picked up Harris nimbly securing that ball within inches of the ground. I had to give my head a major shake to register what had happened!
                  Last edited by CanDB; 04-21-2021, 05:28 PM.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by jazzbodog View Post

                    Good grief....more lame crap. Opinions only count if they have quality value and logical substance. Yours doesn't, IMO.
                    Substance....quality value....like this??? ...

                    also...point proven
                    Last edited by JvDub95; 04-21-2021, 05:29 PM.

                    Comment


                    • The Mean Joe coke commercial was brilliant, because it made this big, scary man look a great role model for kids, and a good guy.....one of my fav commercials all time:

                      Comment


                      • We lived in Philadelphia at the time, I was a kid and the eagles sucked... but Pittsburgh was in the same state and they were a great team to route for..btw, that's my favorite SB commercial... we moved to Colorado the year the broncos went to their first super bowl and I've been a fan ever since...
                        I Love Orange Crush!

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by jpark31 View Post
                          We lived in Philadelphia at the time, I was a kid and the eagles sucked... but Pittsburgh was in the same state and they were a great team to route for..btw, that's my favorite SB commercial... we moved to Colorado the year the broncos went to their first super bowl and I've been a fan ever since...
                          Good to have you jp!!!

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by CanDB View Post

                            Good to have you jp!!!
                            Thanks, I'm here every day...I just don't post much 😀
                            I Love Orange Crush!

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by CanDB View Post

                              As I mentioned, look at the talent in that era, on that team:

                              Offence

                              Lynn Swann
                              John Stallworth
                              Franco Harris
                              Mike Webster
                              Terry Bradshaw

                              Defence

                              Mean Joe Green
                              Jack Lambert
                              Jack Ham
                              Mel Bount
                              Donnie Shell

                              There were others who did not make The Hall, but were excellent players. That Dline was formidable - Green, Greenwood, Holmes and White! The LBers were just as scary with Lambert, Ham and Russell (I believe). And then Blount and Shell patrolling the back end. They were a really good backfield, and they must have played with confidence knowing that their front 7 were in attack mode all game. I remember some games, wondering if certain opponents could even move the ball!

                              I was not a fan, but I was in awe of them! Of course it didn't hurt them or Bradshaw on that Immaculate Reception that Tatum deflected into the fingertips of one Franco Harris!!! I will never forget the shock of seeing a game end, until that is, the cameras picked up Harris nimbly securing that ball within inches of the ground. I had to give my head a major shake to register what had happened!
                              The Steelers during the 70s were an incredible team and very fun to watch. Superb NFL action. Super Bowl 10, 1976, against the Cowboys.

                              Chuck Noll is one of the greatest coaches EVER.
                              Utah Bronco Freak

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by JvDub95 View Post

                                Substance....quality value....like this??? ...

                                also...point proven
                                Point proven that you might be confused?

                                Make sense based on your posts. I'll still glad you're a Bronco fan.
                                Utah Bronco Freak

                                Comment

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