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  • In 1984, he finished 135th out of 1,100 entrants in the Ironman Triathlon in Hawaii.

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    • Originally posted by CanDB View Post
      In 1984, he finished 135th out of 1,100 entrants in the Ironman Triathlon in Hawaii.
      Pat Bowlen...

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      • Originally posted by lvbronx View Post
        Pat Bowlen...
        WINNER!

        A dedicated athlete and competitor, Pat Bowlen maintained an active lifestyle throughout his entire life. He competed in numerous marathons and triathlons, including the Ironman Triathlon in Hawaii—an event in which one must swim 2.4 ocean miles, ride 112 miles on a bicycle and run 26.2 miles, all consecutively. In February 1984, Mr. Bowlen finished 135th out of 1,100 entrants in the Ironman Triathlon in Hawaii, where he maintained a home on Oahu. In high school he competed on the football, hockey and track teams. He attended the University of Oklahoma, where he played freshman football (wide receiver) and went on to earn degrees in both business (1965) and law (1968) .

        Mr. Bowlen, who played defensive back for the Edmonton Huskies of the Canadian Junior Football League in 1962 and was part of the club’s first national championship (Little Grey Cup), began a law practice in Edmonton after graduating from college. After successful careers in oil, gas and real estate in Canada, he went on to purchase the Denver Broncos in 1984.

        And the rest is Mile High history!!!




        Last edited by CanDB; 02-22-2020, 04:38 PM.

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        • Here's a new one to keep it going!

          In the early 1970's, Lyle Alzado wrote a letter to his friend Rich Mollo and in that letter he mentioned that he had bench pressed 500 pounds and was quite proud of that! Another Bronco player at the time found out about that fact and said to Lyle "I hear you bench pressed 500 pounds?" and Lyle said he did, this player then put 485 pounds on the bar and said "go ahead, press it" and Lyle did but he said that he struggled with it. This player then added 50 more pounds to make it 535 pounds, benched it easily, winked at Lyle and left. Paul Smith evidently was there and witnessed it.

          Who was that player?

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          • Originally posted by East Coast Fan View Post
            Here's a new one to keep it going!

            In the early 1970's, Lyle Alzado wrote a letter to his friend Rich Mollo and in that letter he mentioned that he had bench pressed 500 pounds and was quite proud of that! Another Bronco player at the time found out about that fact and said to Lyle "I hear you bench pressed 500 pounds?" and Lyle said he did, this player then put 485 pounds on the bar and said "go ahead, press it" and Lyle did but he said that he struggled with it. This player then added 50 more pounds to make it 535 pounds, benched it easily, winked at Lyle and left. Paul Smith evidently was there and witnessed it.

            Who was that player?
            Dave Costa?
            "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

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            • Originally posted by samparnell View Post
              Dave Costa?
              No, but close.....

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              • Originally posted by East Coast Fan View Post
                No, but close.....
                Rich Jackson?
                "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

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                • Originally posted by samparnell View Post
                  Rich Jackson?
                  You got it! It was "Tombstone" who evidently easily benched that, winked and walked out.

                  He had quite the influence on young Lyle too, and he remembered in his book Rich coming up to him and saying "well, I'll see ya, I've been traded to Cleveland" and Lyle not believing him only to realize he wasn't joking and all he could say with tears in his eyes was "thanks, Rich", and he said that was one of the reasons that he was involved with the "dirty dozen" to get rid of Ralston, he always blamed it on Ralston that Rich screwed up his career by making him practice on a bad knee because he wanted to "see what the players had" when he came in so he made Rich practice on a bad knee.

                  And ironically Alzado left Denver for Cleveland too.

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                  • Originally posted by East Coast Fan View Post
                    You got it! It was "Tombstone" who evidently easily benched that, winked and walked out.

                    He had quite the influence on young Lyle too, and he remembered in his book Rich coming up to him and saying "well, I'll see ya, I've been traded to Cleveland" and Lyle not believing him only to realize he wasn't joking and all he could say with tears in his eyes was "thanks, Rich", and he said that was one of the reasons that he was involved with the "dirty dozen" to get rid of Ralston, he always blamed it on Ralston that Rich screwed up his career by making him practice on a bad knee because he wanted to "see what the players had" when he came in so he made Rich practice on a bad knee.

                    And ironically Alzado left Denver for Cleveland too.
                    Right and Dave Costa went to San Diego that year, too. In my opinion, the D-Lines the Denver Broncos fielded from 1967 through 1976 were the best in their history.
                    "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

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                    • Originally posted by samparnell View Post
                      Right and Dave Costa went to San Diego that year, too. In my opinion, the D-Lines the Denver Broncos fielded from 1967 through 1976 were the best in their history.
                      Yes, Costa just couldn't stand Ralston! And yes, those lines were great, Jackson, Costa, Duranko, Inman, Smith, Alzado and the rest that followed. Paul Smith was pretty close to being the disruptive player that Tombstone was, then unfortunately he tore his Achilles tendon. Alzado in his book said he could hear the pop all the way down the line, Smith just groaned "oh" but walked off the field, he wouldn't let anyone carry him off!

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                      • Originally posted by samparnell View Post
                        Right and Dave Costa went to San Diego that year, too. In my opinion, the D-Lines the Denver Broncos fielded from 1967 through 1976 were the best in their history.
                        What about the 1977 "Orange Crush" defense, Randy Gradishar & Company?
                        Utah Bronco Freak

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                        • Originally posted by jazzbodog View Post
                          What about the 1977 "Orange Crush" defense, Randy Gradishar & Company?
                          He's talking about the "D-Line" not the whole defense.

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                          • Originally posted by jazzbodog View Post
                            What about the 1977 "Orange Crush" defense, Randy Gradishar & Company?
                            Originally posted by East Coast Fan View Post
                            He's talking about the "D-Line" not the whole defense.
                            That's right, I was talking about the D-Lines.

                            From '69 through '72 the D-Lines weren't supported very well by the Backers and Secondary, except for Billy Thompson. The whole D improved from '73 through '76 especially the Backers. In '77 Joe Collier fielded his 34 D with Rubin Carter, Barney Chavous and Lyle Alzado on the D-Line; Randy Gradishar, Tom Jackson, Bob Swenson and Joe Rizzo at the Backers; and, Louis Wright, Steve Foley, Billy Thompson and Bernard Jackson in the Secondary. That was a great D.
                            "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

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                            • Originally posted by samparnell View Post
                              That's right, I was talking about the D-Lines.

                              From '69 through '72 the D-Lines weren't supported very well by the Backers and Secondary, except for Billy Thompson. The whole D improved from '73 through '76 especially the Backers. In '77 Joe Collier fielded his 34 D with Rubin Carter, Barney Chavous and Lyle Alzado on the D-Line; Randy Gradishar, Tom Jackson, Bob Swenson and Joe Rizzo at the Backers; and, Louis Wright, Steve Foley, Billy Thompson and Bernard Jackson in the Secondary. That was a great D.
                              Just for fun I sometimes daydream about if Tombstone Jackson was around and on that '77 defense, my God they would've been even stronger than they were which was really strong to begin with!

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                              • Originally posted by East Coast Fan View Post
                                He's talking about the "D-Line" not the whole defense.
                                Thanks for the clarification.
                                Utah Bronco Freak

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