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  • columbiaskinny pm'd me with the link to the following story:

    http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=2940788

    Officer: Person of interest in Williams death denies shooting Broncos player
    Associated Press

    Updated: July 18, 2007, 5:44 PM ET

    DENVER -- A man considered a person of interest in the shooting death of Broncos cornerback Darrent Williams wrote a letter in state prison saying he did not kill Williams, a federal agent testified Wednesday.

    Willie DeWayne Clark, 24, wrote to another inmate saying authorities had asked him about Williams' slaying "but I didn't do it," Special Federal Officer Robert Fuller said during a hearing in an unrelated drug case against Clark.

    Williams, 24, a former Oklahoma State University standout, died from a gunshot wound in the neck as he and others were riding away from a New Year's Eve party at a Denver nightclub. Two other people with Williams in the stretch Hummer limousine were injured.

    No one has been arrested on charges stemming directly from the shooting.

    Authorities identified Clark as a person of interest because they allege he worked for a gang-linked drug organization run by Brian Hicks, the owner of a sport utility vehicle that authorities believe was used in Williams' slaying.

    Hicks was in jail at the time, awaiting trial on attempted murder charges.

    Fuller said Clark's letter denying responsibility for the slaying was written in March when he was serving a 180-day sentence for a parole violation. Fuller said authorities obtained a copy of the letter but did not know to whom it was written.

    When Clark finished his parole violation sentence, he was turned over to federal authorities on charges of possessing and distributing cocaine. A judge refused Wednesday to set bail, citing Clark's record of 31 missed court appearances on various charges.

    He is due back in court Aug. 1.

    Clark's lawyer, Alaurice Tafoya-Modi, said in a court filing last week that Clark was being "treated as a suspect" in the Williams case, The Denver Post reported Wednesday.

    In the filing, Tafoya-Modi asked for additional help defending him, saying the drug case would likely be affected by the Williams investigation. The judge denied the request, calling it premature.

    Court officials said Tafoya-Modi's filing was not available Wednesday. She declined comment.

    Denver police did not immediately return a phone call.

    Denver police spokesman John White said Clark is still a person of interest. He declined further comment.

    Copyright 2007 by The Associated Press


    Thanks to Bronco4Life and Medford Bronco for signature

    Rest in Peace - Darrent (27) and Damien (29

    Comment


    • hmm... that kinda confused me...

      But i didnt read anything on page s 2-9 so...

      Some guy is in jail for like a while or something for selling cocaine and they are trying to link D-Will's death with this guys for selling cocaine???

      I HAD to miss something...
      Sept. 10, 2006, [email protected] 10-18, Sept. 28, 2008, [email protected] 19-33, Nov. 16, 2014, [email protected] 7-22 <--Broncos games I've attended

      Comment


      • Originally posted by ozzies94ta
        hmm... that kinda confused me...

        But i didnt read anything on page s 2-9 so...

        Some guy is in jail for like a while or something for selling cocaine and they are trying to link D-Will's death with this guys for selling cocaine???

        I HAD to miss something...
        Because this guy is a suspect, you cannot hold someone in jail for that, so he is being held on drug charges, which they definitely have on him.


        Thanks to Bronco4Life and Medford Bronco for signature

        Rest in Peace - Darrent (27) and Damien (29

        Comment


        • Another story http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drm...635714,00.html

          Drug trial testimony links gang to killings

          By Sara Burnett, Rocky Mountain News
          July 19, 2007
          It was New Year's Eve 2002 when eight gang members - all of them "on the rise" in the metro-area drug trade - made a pact.
          They would work together. And they would "f--- everybody else."

          That was the start of a violent and highly profitable group known as the Elite Eight, investigator Robert Fuller said in testimony in federal court Wednesday.

          The eight, most of whom have been named in federal drug indictments, moved hundreds of kilograms of cocaine worth millions of dollars through the Denver area, said Fuller, an investigator with the Denver District Attorney's Office assigned to the Metro Gang Task Force.

          They operated nine or 10 drug stash houses, mostly in the Five Points and Park Hill neighborhoods, Fuller testified. They also intimidated witnesses and are suspected in as many as 11 unsolved homicides.

          Although he did not name any victims, other sources have said the killings include the New Year's Day shooting of Denver Broncos player Darrent Williams.

          Fuller's testimony came during a hearing for Willie D. Clark, 25. In court documents this week, Clark's attorney said he is one of three people police suspect in Williams' slaying.

          No one has been charged in the Williams' case, but authorities have said that all of the people believed to be involved are behind bars, being held without bail as part of a massive federal drug indictment handed up this year.

          Clark, who is charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute cocaine, started as a "runner," delivering drugs and money for the Elite Eight, Fuller testified. He later began cooking crack cocaine and eventually had his own customer base, he said.

          Fuller also said Clark wrote letters while in jail saying he was going to do "one more mission" when he got out, then leave Colorado because there are "too many snitches" here.

          Clark's attorney, Alaurice Marie Tafoya-Modi, argued that information the police have about Clark came from other defendants in the case, people with criminal records who will do anything to get a deal from authorities.

          She also described the information against him as "very, very limited."

          But Magistrate Judge Boyd N. Boland found there was probable cause for the charge. He ordered Clark held without bail, noting his record of failing to appear for court more than two dozen times, his use of several aliases, and his history of violating the conditions of parole and probation.

          Clark is scheduled to appear in court on Aug. 1 for his arraignment.

          Fuller identified the leader of the Elite Eight as Brian Hicks, whom he described as "a smart young man" who also is charged in the federal drug indictment.

          Police have said an SUV registered to Hicks was used in the New Year's Day drive-by shooting that left Williams dead. Hicks was in jail at the time of Williams' killing, but police say other members of the gang were using his vehicle.

          Hicks' attorney has said he doesn't know who was using the Chevy Tahoe, and Hicks has pleaded not guilty to the drug charges.

          Fuller said the Elite Eight took in large quantities of money with Hicks at the helm. In one instance, a cooperating defendant told Fuller, the group had $1.5 million in cash in one of its stash houses - $800,000 stacked in the living room and $700,000 stored elsewhere.

          Fuller also said the group included several members who were known to carry guns and who worked as the "muscle," guarding stash houses. Some, such as Vernon Edwards, he described as "killers" or "shooters."

          Hicks would "whisper in (Edwards') ear" and "bodies would appear," Fuller testified.

          The men have not been charged with any killings, and Edwards' attorney, Anthony Viorst, said Wednesday it was the first he had heard of the claims.

          "We deny those allegations," Viorst said.

          A Denver grand jury is believed to be hearing the Williams murder case. Sources have said it could be months before charges are filed.

          The Elite Eight

          These are the men whom Robert Fuller, an investigator with the Metro Gang Task Force, identified Wednesday as members of a violent group of drug dealers known as the Elite Eight, and Fuller's characterizations:

          • BRIAN HICKS

          The group leader, described as "a smart young man" and "the complete package." Hicks was in jail at the time Denver Broncos player Darrent Williams was killed, but police say the fatal shots were fired from an SUV registered to him. Pleaded not guilty to federal drug charges.

          • VERNON EDWARDS

          A "muscle" guy who allegedly guarded drug stash houses. Edwards' attorney denied the allegations, and Edwards pleaded not guilty to federal drug charges.

          • HAVEN BREWER

          Close to Hicks, a suspected dealer of kilogram quantities of cocaine. Pleaded not guilty to federal drug charges.

          • MALCOLM WATSON

          Also accused of selling cocaine in kilos. Pleaded not guilty to federal drug charges.

          • BENJAMIN THOMAS

          A poor businessman who wasn't as proficient as the others at making money. Pleaded not guilty to drug charges.

          • MICHAEL WADE

          Also known as Gumby. Not charged in the federal drug indictment.

          • KAMAU MARSHALL

          Not charged in the federal drug indictment.

          • ERNEST DANIELS

          Not charged in the federal drug indictment.Source: Fuller'S Court Testimony

          The rise of the Eight

          According to Fuller and court documents:

          • New Years Eve, 2002: Eight gang members "on the rise" in the local drug trade make a pact to work together, forming a group known as the Elite Eight.

          • June 2005: The alleged leader of the Elite Eight, Brian Hicks, is charged with attempted murder of Kalonniann Clark. He later is released on bail.

          • August 2005: The Metro Gang Task Force begins investigating the Crips gang, of which the Elite Eight are members, according to Fuller. The investigation involves surveillance and more than 50 wiretaps, recording up to 175,000 calls during the next 18 months.

          • November 2006: Hicks and two other alleged members of the Elite Eight, Haven Brewer and Malcolm Watson, are charged with possessing 4 kilograms of cocaine after they are spotted leaving a store Hicks owned on Colfax Avenue.

          • December 2006: While Hicks is in jail on drug charges, Kalonniann Clark is shot and killed. It is days before she is scheduled to testify against Hicks.

          • Jan. 1, 2007: Denver Broncos player Darrent Williams is shot outside a nightclub. The fatal shots are fired from an SUV registered to Hicks, who is still in jail. Hicks' attorney says Hicks is not involved and doesn't know who had his vehicle.

          • April 2007: More than 100 people - including several members of the Elite Eight - are charged in federal drug indictments. Authorities call it the largest gang and drug sweep in metro Denver history.

          • Wednesday: Fuller says that at least one member of the Elite Eight, whom he does not name, is providing information about the group to authorities.

          [email protected] or 303-954-5343


          Thanks to Bronco4Life and Medford Bronco for signature

          Rest in Peace - Darrent (27) and Damien (29

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Denver Native
            Another story http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drm...635714,00.html

            Drug trial testimony links gang to killings

            By Sara Burnett, Rocky Mountain News
            July 19, 2007
            It was New Year's Eve 2002 when eight gang members - all of them "on the rise" in the metro-area drug trade - made a pact.
            They would work together. And they would "f--- everybody else."

            That was the start of a violent and highly profitable group known as the Elite Eight, investigator Robert Fuller said in testimony in federal court Wednesday.

            The eight, most of whom have been named in federal drug indictments, moved hundreds of kilograms of cocaine worth millions of dollars through the Denver area, said Fuller, an investigator with the Denver District Attorney's Office assigned to the Metro Gang Task Force.

            They operated nine or 10 drug stash houses, mostly in the Five Points and Park Hill neighborhoods, Fuller testified. They also intimidated witnesses and are suspected in as many as 11 unsolved homicides.

            Although he did not name any victims, other sources have said the killings include the New Year's Day shooting of Denver Broncos player Darrent Williams.

            Fuller's testimony came during a hearing for Willie D. Clark, 25. In court documents this week, Clark's attorney said he is one of three people police suspect in Williams' slaying.

            No one has been charged in the Williams' case, but authorities have said that all of the people believed to be involved are behind bars, being held without bail as part of a massive federal drug indictment handed up this year.

            Clark, who is charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute cocaine, started as a "runner," delivering drugs and money for the Elite Eight, Fuller testified. He later began cooking crack cocaine and eventually had his own customer base, he said.

            Fuller also said Clark wrote letters while in jail saying he was going to do "one more mission" when he got out, then leave Colorado because there are "too many snitches" here.

            Clark's attorney, Alaurice Marie Tafoya-Modi, argued that information the police have about Clark came from other defendants in the case, people with criminal records who will do anything to get a deal from authorities.

            She also described the information against him as "very, very limited."

            But Magistrate Judge Boyd N. Boland found there was probable cause for the charge. He ordered Clark held without bail, noting his record of failing to appear for court more than two dozen times, his use of several aliases, and his history of violating the conditions of parole and probation.

            Clark is scheduled to appear in court on Aug. 1 for his arraignment.

            Fuller identified the leader of the Elite Eight as Brian Hicks, whom he described as "a smart young man" who also is charged in the federal drug indictment.

            Police have said an SUV registered to Hicks was used in the New Year's Day drive-by shooting that left Williams dead. Hicks was in jail at the time of Williams' killing, but police say other members of the gang were using his vehicle.

            Hicks' attorney has said he doesn't know who was using the Chevy Tahoe, and Hicks has pleaded not guilty to the drug charges.

            Fuller said the Elite Eight took in large quantities of money with Hicks at the helm. In one instance, a cooperating defendant told Fuller, the group had $1.5 million in cash in one of its stash houses - $800,000 stacked in the living room and $700,000 stored elsewhere.

            Fuller also said the group included several members who were known to carry guns and who worked as the "muscle," guarding stash houses. Some, such as Vernon Edwards, he described as "killers" or "shooters."

            Hicks would "whisper in (Edwards') ear" and "bodies would appear," Fuller testified.

            The men have not been charged with any killings, and Edwards' attorney, Anthony Viorst, said Wednesday it was the first he had heard of the claims.

            "We deny those allegations," Viorst said.

            A Denver grand jury is believed to be hearing the Williams murder case. Sources have said it could be months before charges are filed.

            The Elite Eight

            These are the men whom Robert Fuller, an investigator with the Metro Gang Task Force, identified Wednesday as members of a violent group of drug dealers known as the Elite Eight, and Fuller's characterizations:

            • BRIAN HICKS

            The group leader, described as "a smart young man" and "the complete package." Hicks was in jail at the time Denver Broncos player Darrent Williams was killed, but police say the fatal shots were fired from an SUV registered to him. Pleaded not guilty to federal drug charges.

            • VERNON EDWARDS

            A "muscle" guy who allegedly guarded drug stash houses. Edwards' attorney denied the allegations, and Edwards pleaded not guilty to federal drug charges.

            • HAVEN BREWER

            Close to Hicks, a suspected dealer of kilogram quantities of cocaine. Pleaded not guilty to federal drug charges.

            • MALCOLM WATSON

            Also accused of selling cocaine in kilos. Pleaded not guilty to federal drug charges.

            • BENJAMIN THOMAS

            A poor businessman who wasn't as proficient as the others at making money. Pleaded not guilty to drug charges.

            • MICHAEL WADE

            Also known as Gumby. Not charged in the federal drug indictment.

            • KAMAU MARSHALL

            Not charged in the federal drug indictment.

            • ERNEST DANIELS

            Not charged in the federal drug indictment.Source: Fuller'S Court Testimony

            The rise of the Eight

            According to Fuller and court documents:

            • New Years Eve, 2002: Eight gang members "on the rise" in the local drug trade make a pact to work together, forming a group known as the Elite Eight.

            • June 2005: The alleged leader of the Elite Eight, Brian Hicks, is charged with attempted murder of Kalonniann Clark. He later is released on bail.

            • August 2005: The Metro Gang Task Force begins investigating the Crips gang, of which the Elite Eight are members, according to Fuller. The investigation involves surveillance and more than 50 wiretaps, recording up to 175,000 calls during the next 18 months.

            • November 2006: Hicks and two other alleged members of the Elite Eight, Haven Brewer and Malcolm Watson, are charged with possessing 4 kilograms of cocaine after they are spotted leaving a store Hicks owned on Colfax Avenue.

            • December 2006: While Hicks is in jail on drug charges, Kalonniann Clark is shot and killed. It is days before she is scheduled to testify against Hicks.

            • Jan. 1, 2007: Denver Broncos player Darrent Williams is shot outside a nightclub. The fatal shots are fired from an SUV registered to Hicks, who is still in jail. Hicks' attorney says Hicks is not involved and doesn't know who had his vehicle.

            • April 2007: More than 100 people - including several members of the Elite Eight - are charged in federal drug indictments. Authorities call it the largest gang and drug sweep in metro Denver history.

            • Wednesday: Fuller says that at least one member of the Elite Eight, whom he does not name, is providing information about the group to authorities.

            [email protected] or 303-954-5343

            Thats great news all around - hopefully this person will help get DWills killer behind bars for life and also help clean up some of this gang BS that is over taking the cities in this country

            Comment


            • Another story http://www.9news.com/news/local/arti...?storyid=73940

              Investigators testify about suspect in Darrent Williams murder


              DENVER – A suspect in the death of Denver Broncos cornerback Darrent Williams appeared for a preliminary hearing on federal drug charges Wednesday.

              Willie DeWayne Clark faces federal charges of conspiracy and knowingly possessing with intent to distribute crack cocaine.

              Investigator Robert Fuller testified in federal court that Clark was part of a large crack cocaine distribution organization run by the tre-tre crips gang lead by Brian Hicks.

              According to police, Hicks' SUV was used in the Williams shooting. Fuller testified Wednesday that Clark was immediately wanted for questioning in the murder.

              Fuller said when Clark was not at the address he had given his parole officer, a warrant was issued. Clark was arrested at his attorney's office on January 5. He was carrying $7,282 in cash. Fuller said the bills tested positive for crack cocaine.

              Fuller also testified that in the days following Clark's arrest, three gang members or associates of Hicks visited Clark in jail. Fuller says all were sent there to deliver the same message: "don't say anything stupid." Fuller testified that meant Clark shouldn't give up any information about Hicks or the gang's involvement in drugs or the Williams murder.

              Clark was detained for six months on the parole violation in Colorado Springs. He was turned over to federal authorities after he finished serving that sentence.

              Hicks was in jail awaiting trial on drug and attempted murder charges at the time of Williams' murder. His white SUV was found spray-painted black several days after the murder. No one has been charged in the Williams murder. 9NEWS has learned a Denver grand jury is investigating the case.

              Fuller's testimony also described the intricate drug operation lead by Hicks and his group of "Elite 8" gang members. Fuller says Clark was known as a runner and cooker who was "moving up" in the organization.

              Members of the "Elite 8" include leader Brian Hicks, Haven Brewer, Malcolm Watson, Michael Wade, Benjamin Thomas, Vernon Edwards, Kamau Marshall and Ernest Daniels. Edwards has also been called a "person of interest" in Williams Murder.

              Fuller testified that at its height, the "Elite 8" ran nine to ten drug stash houses in Denver, trafficked in hundreds of kilos of crack cocaine that resulted in profits that ran in the millions of dollars.

              Court records also say the broader Denver crips gang the "Elite 8" belonged to may be responsible for as many as 11 unsolved murders in the metro area.

              Federal Magistrate Judge Boyd N. Boland denied bond and held the case over for trial. Clark will be arraigned on August 1.


              Thanks to Bronco4Life and Medford Bronco for signature

              Rest in Peace - Darrent (27) and Damien (29

              Comment


              • Letter reveals feds' belief in link to Williams' death

                Letter reveals feds' belief in link to Williams' death
                Suspected gang member eyed in slaying of Bronco

                http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drm...691207,00.html


                By Sara Burnett, Rocky Mountain News

                September 6, 2007


                Federal prosecutors connected suspected gang member Brian Hicks to the murder of Denver Broncos player Darrent Williams in a letter to the Department of Justice more than four months ago, according to court filings.
                The letter, made public recently, is the first official, signed document to link Hicks and his associates to the New Year's Day drive-by shooting, as well as other killings.

                "Hicks is a suspect in several murders being investigated in the Denver area," Assistant U.S. Attorney Michele Korver wrote in an April 22 letter to officials in Washington.

                "One of the murder victims . . . an eyewitness in Hicks' attempted murder case, was shot before she was to give testimony against Hicks at trial. In addition, Denver homicide detectives suspect Hicks was involved in the recent shooting death of an NFL player."

                No charges have been filed in either killing, and Hicks' attorneys have denied he was involved.

                Hicks, 28, was in jail when both Williams and the witness, Kaloniann Clark, died. In a phone call recorded shortly after Williams' murder, Hicks repeatedly said he didn't know anything about it.

                "The only time I find out something is when I use the phone or watch the news or something," Hicks said, according to a transcript of the call. "I don't even know what's going on."

                Police say the shots that killed Williams were fired from an SUV registered to Hicks. They also have said that Hicks and other members of his gang may be involved in as many as 11 unsolved murders.

                All of those suspects were indicted on federal drug charges as part of a massive April bust, authorities said.

                Prosecutors now hope the charges will motivate some of the defendants to provide information against other suspects in exchange for lighter prison sentences.

                Police zeroed in on Hicks and the people close to him early in the investigation, visiting him at the jail and quickly taking one of his friends, Willie Clark, into custody for questioning.

                They also started putting pressure on his girlfriend, Veronica Garcia, according to a court document filed by her attorney.

                A few weeks after Williams' murder, Denver homicide detectives visited Garcia's relatives, defense attorney John Mosby wrote. They also took one of her friends to the police station, where they told her about a reward for information in the killing, and began asking her about Garcia.

                The next day, detectives told Garcia they wanted to talk to her about the Williams murder. Garcia told detectives several times that she knew nothing about the killing, and she refused to go to the police station for questioning, according to the document.

                She also said police visited her house again the following day, and that detectives told her they would subpoena her to appear before a grand jury if she didn't cooperate.

                Garcia still refused.

                So in April, federal prosecutors sought permission from the Department of Justice to file federal charges against Garcia for a 2004 drug charge in Adams County, even though she already had been sentenced to a halfway house for the crime.

                The legal tactic is used occasionally in federal court, usually to get a tougher sentence against a defendant, and must be approved by officials in Washington.

                In the letter, Korver said investigators didn't have enough evidence to file new drug charges, and that the government thought Garcia's state court sentence had provided "little to no motivation" for her to cooperate with police.

                She also said prosecutors believe Garcia is closely connected to Hicks, and likely to have information about the murders.

                Garcia was indicted along with the others three days later. But prosecutors dropped the charges last month, after Garcia's attorney filed a motion calling it a "vindictive prosecution."

                Jeff Dorschner, spokesman for the U.S. Attorney's Office, declined to comment Wednesday on the decision to drop the case.

                Hicks' phone call

                Excerpts from a phone call between Brian Hicks and his girlfriend, Veronica Garcia, and an unidentified male. The call was recorded by the Denver jail, where Hicks was being held.

                • On being questioned by police about the Darrent Williams murder:

                "They come up here asking me. You know, I don't know nothing, (expletive), I been in jail, so as a matter of fact, don't even come up here. I told that to the major. He was like, who do you want to talk to? I said (defense attorneys) Harvey Steinberg and Walter Gerash."

                • On possible reasons someone shot Williams:

                "He could have argued with somebody . . . or he might have told somebody something they didn't like. I don't know . . . all they really saying is, oh, they get into an altercation and this happened. There got to be more to the story that the other people ain't telling, you know what I mean?"

                • On learning about the shooting, and that his SUV was involved, then later spray-painted and abandoned:

                "I still don't believe it's true . . . I really didn't believe it, but then when I seen my (expletive) car on the damn TV all (expletive) up, spray painted . . . I was like, what the (expletive) is going on?"

                • On what Garcia should tell Willie Clark, who had just been picked up for questioning in the murder:

                "If he don't know nothing, he need - he just need to tell them, 'I don't know' . . . You should go talk to him. Just tell him - just tell him that if he on TV, just - just chill the (expletive) out."Source: Transcript Filed In U.S. District Court

                [email protected] or 303-954-5343

                Comment


                • I hope justice is served.

                  Comment


                  • Suspect in Bronco's slaying: It wasn't me

                    Suspect in Bronco's slaying: It wasn't me
                    Suspect in Bronco slaying writes that he's falsely accused

                    By Sara Burnett, Rocky Mountain News
                    October 16, 2007
                    In what he calls "the answer to the No. 1 question of the year," Willie Clark says he did not kill Denver Bronco Darrent Williams, and he doesn't know who did.
                    "I was not involved or present," the 25-year-old said in one of three letters sent to the Rocky Mountain News in recent weeks.

                    Clark, the only suspect in the killing publicly named so far, also said other defendants are falsely accusing him to get leniency in their own cases, and that "the real me" isn't the drug-dealing gang member he's been portrayed as in the media.

                    "I do not condone black-on- black violence or gang violence," he wrote. "I'm no saint but I damn sure ain't no member of no gang, drug dealer and most importantly I'm no murderer!"

                    Clark was taken into custody days after Williams' shooting death. He has not been charged in the New Year's Day killing, but in a court filing, his attorney said he is one of three suspects identified by Denver police.

                    In June, Clark was indicted along with several other suspected gang members in a federal drug conspiracy. He is being held in the federal detention center.

                    Denver police spokesman Sonny Jackson declined to comment on Clark's statements.

                    Asked about Clark's comments, U.S. Attorney for Colorado Troy Eid on Monday released a one-sentence response.

                    "We'll see Mr. Clark in court, and look forward to that day," Eid said.

                    New Year's Day shooting

                    Williams, 24, was killed as he was leaving a Denver nightclub following a New Year's Eve party. Authorities have said other people at the club that night had an argument with some patrons, and that the disagreement spilled outside as the party ended.

                    Williams left in a Hummer limousine. According to police, someone fired shots at the limo from a white SUV registered to Brian Hicks, an accused gang leader who was in jail at the time.

                    Williams died at the scene. Two others were hit but survived.

                    Clark was picked up for a parole violation four days later. At the time, authorities called him one of three "persons of interest" in the Williams case.

                    He was held on the parole violation until July, when he was released briefly, then re-arrested on federal drug charges. The same drug investigation led to indictments of more than 100 people, including Hicks and several other suspected gang members.

                    Authorities have said they hope pressure from the federal drug charges will lead to information about Williams' death and up to 11 other unsolved homicides.

                    Denver police have been tight- lipped about how Clark made it on their radar for Williams' death. But some of Williams' friends from Texas who were visiting him the night of the shooting told HBO's Real Sports that they identified for police some of the men involved in the argument.

                    In his letters, Clark said three other people - one whose name he never heard before - also gave police his name. He did not name those people, but said they all are facing drug or weapons charges.

                    "It's clear that all three of these men have something in common, all three face some serious time in (federal prison) for the crimes that they were caught doing, now they realize what they've done they're trying to lie on as many people as possible to help reduce the amount of time that they get, and they all chose to lie on me," he wrote.

                    Normal teenage stuff

                    Clark describes growing up in Denver's Five Points neighborhood, which he called "a rough neighborhood that was infested with gangs, drugs and violence."

                    As a result, Clark said, most young people were labeled gang members. In his case, and most others, the label was inaccurate, he said.

                    "I stuck with being different as I would say 'unique,' " he wrote, adding that he had a close family and never needed the protection that gangs could provide for others.

                    He was arrested for the first time in 1994, when he was 11 or 12, after having a BB gun "war" with a friend. His friend's sister "got caught in the cross," panicked and called 911. Clark got 20 days in juvenile detention, he said.

                    He also admits being picked up as a juvenile for using marijuana and curfew violations.

                    His adult criminal history includes three felony convictions, federal authorities say. Among them is a conviction for stealing a car and for an assault while being held in a Texas jail. He also was charged in 2006 with misdemeanor possession of marijuana.

                    But as he noted in one of his letters, Clark's record includes nothing as serious as the allegations he is facing now.

                    He believes he was drawn into the federal drug investigation in part because of his friendship with Hicks, whom he grew up with in Five Points.

                    He also says there is another reason.

                    "You know as well as I know the only reason why I am facing the federal charge is because the state could not place me or them other two guys in that truck that they say was used in the death of Darrent Williams."

                    Federal investigation

                    Federal authorities say that's not true. At a hearing in July, a special agent with the Metro Gang Task Force told a federal judge that Clark joined up with a group of gang members called the Elite Eight in 2006.

                    The agent, Robert Fuller, said the group may be linked to several unsolved homicides and is believed to have moved hundreds of kilograms of drugs through the Denver area.

                    Clark started as a runner for Hicks, the group's leader, Fuller said. He also said Clark eventually began cooking his own crack and selling to his own customers.

                    Fuller got his information from two confidential informants, he said. According to the affidavit filed in the case, one of those informants admitted he supplied kilogram quantities of drugs to the group, and that Clark was present during one of those sales.

                    In his letters, Clark denied taking part in any drug transaction. He said he has learned the identity of the informant, and that the person has a grudge against him because he believes Clark burglarized his mother's house a decade ago. He also said that while he grew up with Hicks, he never associated with any of the other men Fuller named as members of the Elite Eight.

                    Clark hopes his letters will clear his name in the public. He said having his name and face in the media has hurt his family and tainted potential jurors who may some day decide his fate.

                    "I'm not perfect," he wrote. "No one on God's earth surface is, but I know as well as plenty of others know that I'm not guilty of the crimes that was mentioned!"

                    Letter excerpts

                    Willie Clark titled his missive "Letter to the Public: Defending Myself."

                    "My name has been slandered, character has been poisoned so now when the people who do not know the real me hears (sic) my name, they visualize the image of a man who is capable of murder at any cost who poisons the community with drugs. That is not who I am by far. I am not capable of taking another human being's life from them and their family."

                    "I grew up in a rough neighborhood that was infested with gangs, drugs and violence, and as a result the majority of the young were labeled members of the local gangs. Some were accurate labels and some were not by far."

                    "Growing up I went through the phase every typical teenager grows through i.e. house parties, female relationships, drugs and alcohol use, joy-riding, school fights just the typical stage before maturing."

                    "I have not been charged (with the murder of Darrent Williams) but I'm already convicted by the media and their articles that the public reads and been watching everyday! These are the same people that will be picked as jurors which the media has tainted. I'm not perfect no one on God's earth surface is, but I know as well as plenty of others know that I'm not guilty of the crimes that was mentioned!"

                    [email protected] or 303-954-5343

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                    • Originally posted by Scheffler88 View Post
                      "I have not been charged (with the murder of Darrent Williams) but I'm already convicted by the media and their articles that the public reads and been watching everyday! These are the same people that will be picked as jurors which the media has tainted. I'm not perfect no one on God's earth surface is, but I know as well as plenty of others know that I'm not guilty of the crimes that was mentioned!"

                      [email protected] or 303-954-5343

                      Thanks for the article. Is he setting up for a mistrial or having it moved to a different location?
                      Administrator

                      Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage

                      Lupus Awareness

                      "a semicolon is used when an author could've chosen to end their sentence, but chose not to. The author is you and the sentence is your life ; "

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                      • Originally posted by Scheffler88 View Post
                        "I do not condone black-on- black violence or gang violence,"

                        I suppose he doesn't have a problem, then, with black-on-white, black-on-yellow, black-on-red ...or whatever else is left, huh? What an ignorant, self-demeaning thing to say. Shows the problem with a lot of people in the world today.

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                        Best of luck, TT!
                        ...Always a class act - in any uniform.



                        sbutk: i can see why Denver is taking TO's right now [trailing by 7, with 30 seconds left in the half]. but why Oakland???

                        Captain Lori: You are trying to figure out the Raiders. Try figuring out women instead; it's probably much easier.

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