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What Happened to Brandon Marshall?

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  • What Happened to Brandon Marshall?

    All i know is on one of the OTA days he walked off of the field with a "noticeable limp" but said nothing was wrong to the media. However i don't think he has practiced sense. Have any of you heard more news on him or what happened that i missed somehow? Thanks!
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  • #2
    Are you sure they weren't talking about Sam Brandon?

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    • #3
      He tweaked his hamstring, i think. Hes being held out a a precautionary measure.
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      • #4
        Originally posted by Broncosfreak_56
        He tweaked his hamstring, i think. Hes being held out a a precautionary measure.
        Oh ok thanks! well it doesn't sound too bad!
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        • #5
          Originally posted by Broncosfreak_56
          He tweaked his hamstring, i think. Hes being held out a a precautionary measure.
          I think it was actually his calf.

          Originally posted by AndrewMason
          Marshall was just getting some treatment on his calf muscle yesterday so he sat out some of the full-scale offense-vs.-defense work, but was in the individual and team-installation work, which is a good sign.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by denverbroncofrk
            I think it was actually his calf.

            It sounds like its nothing too serious.
            John 11: 25-27

            My Adopt-A-Bronco is D.J. Williams



            Thanks Snk16

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            • #7
              Originally posted by TXBRONC
              It sounds like its nothing too serious.

              I'd say not if he is participating in individual work & team installation stuff...just not O vs. D right now. Could be the calf cramped up pretty bad...not sure I've ever heard of pulling the calf muscle (not saying it can't happen though).
              Supporter of the "Don't Like the Thread, Don't Post In It" rule

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Bronco_Neddie
                I'd say not if he is participating in individual work & team installation stuff...just not O vs. D right now. Could be the calf cramped up pretty bad...not sure I've ever heard of pulling the calf muscle (not saying it can't happen though).

                Calf craps hurt like a b****... you can put pressure on your leg and any movement other than the resting position can cause another crap, the muscle tightens up soo much you want pain pills.


                I used to get them every spring practice and it got to the point that I was made to get an I.V. after every practice to try and stop them.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by TU_HurricaneDB
                  Calf craps hurt like a b****... you can put pressure on your leg and any movement other than the resting position can cause another crap, the muscle tightens up soo much you want pain pills.


                  I used to get them every spring practice and it got to the point that I was made to get an I.V. after every practice to try and stop them.

                  I hear ya there...had the ol' calf cramp myself a time or two, but what about actually pulling the muscle itself. Ever heard of that?

                  Ya figure they are just keeping him out of the most physical part of OTA's? the O vs D segment...I could see that.

                  The individual Offense work & team installation (walk-throughs most likely) is probably less rigorous than going up against the likes of Baily/Bly...the change of direction, adjusting to coverage, etc could stress the muscle more. While "simple" offense work & walk-throughs are going to be more fluid.
                  Supporter of the "Don't Like the Thread, Don't Post In It" rule

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bronco_Neddie
                    I hear ya there...had the ol' calf cramp myself a time or two, but what about actually pulling the muscle itself. Ever heard of that?

                    Ya figure they are just keeping him out of the most physical part of OTA's? the O vs D segment...I could see that.

                    The individual Offense work & team installation (walk-throughs most likely) is probably less rigorous than going up against the likes of Baily/Bly...the change of direction, adjusting to coverage, etc could stress the muscle more. While "simple" offense work & walk-throughs are going to be more fluid.

                    You know I have never heard of a torn calf muscle but I have seen a player tear his achillis right in front of me during pre-game warm-ups against Oklahoma one year, it was sad and funny because he tripped over an imaginary line.

                    This is all I could find on calf muscle tears:

                    A strained calf muscle is a partial tear of the small fibers of the calf muscles

                    Calf Muscle Strain
                    (Pulled Calf Muscle; Gastrocnemius Strain)
                    by Laurie LaRusso, MS, ELS

                    En Español (Spanish Version)

                    Definition
                    A strained calf muscle is a partial tear of the small fibers of the calf muscles. The calf muscles are located in the back of your lower leg.


                    The Calf Muscles

                    Causes
                    A calf strain can be caused by:

                    Stretching the calf muscles beyond the amount of tension that they can withstand
                    Suddenly putting stress on the calf muscles when they are not ready for the stress
                    Using the calf muscles too much on a certain day
                    A direct blow to the calf muscles

                    Risk Factors
                    A risk factor is something that increases your chance of getting a disease, condition, or injury. Risk factors for calf muscle strain include:

                    Sports that require bursts of speed, such as:
                    Running
                    Hurdles
                    Long jump
                    Basketball
                    Soccer
                    Football
                    Rugby
                    Fatigue
                    Tight calf muscles
                    Overexertion
                    Cold weather

                    Symptoms
                    Symptoms of calf muscle strain include:

                    Pain and tenderness in the calf
                    Stiffness in the calf muscles
                    Weakness of the calf muscles
                    Pain when pushing off the foot or standing on tiptoe
                    Bruising on the calf (if blood vessels are broken)
                    Popping sensation as the muscle tears (possibly)

                    Diagnosis
                    The doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history, your recent physical activity, and how the injury occurred. The doctor will also examine your calf for:

                    Tenderness and/or bruising directly over the calf muscles
                    Pain when contracting the calf muscles, particularly against resistance

                    Muscle strains are graded according to their severity, with grade 1 being the least severe.

                    Grade 1
                    Stretching with some microtearing of muscle fibers.
                    Recovery can be complete in about 2-3 weeks.
                    Grade 2
                    Partial tearing of muscle fibers.
                    Recovery can take up to 1-2 months.
                    Grade 3
                    Complete tearing (rupture) of muscle fibers.
                    Complete recovery can take more than 3 months.
                    For a severe calf strain, professional and college athletes sometimes have MRI scans to help predict the length of their recovery period.

                    Treatment
                    Treatment depends on the severity of the strain.

                    Treatment usually includes:

                    Rest – Do not do activities that cause pain, such as running, jumping, and weightlifting using the lower leg muscles. If normal walking hurts, shorten your stride. Do not play sports until the pain and local tenderness are gone.

                    Cold – Apply ice or a cold pack to the calf area for 15–20 minutes, 4 times a day, for several days after the injury. Wrap the ice or cold pack in a towel. Do not apply the ice directly to your skin.

                    Pain Relief Medications – Take aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), or acetaminophen (Tylenol) to help relieve pain. It is best not to take aspirin or ibuprofen during the first 24 hours if you have a lot of swelling because those meds interfere with the clotting mechanism. If you still have tenderness in the calf while taking these drugs, do not return to physical activity. Check with your doctor.

                    Compression – Wear an elastic compression bandage (e.g., Ace bandage) around your lower leg to prevent additional swelling. Wrap from the toes up the leg so as to not cause swelling below the wrapping. Be careful not to wrap the bandage too tightly.

                    Elevation – Keep your leg higher than your heart as much as possible for the first 24 hours to minimize swelling.

                    Heat – Do not use heat at all during the first 3 to 5 days. Use heat only when you are returning to physical activity. Then use it before stretching or getting ready to play sports.

                    Stretching – When the acute pain is gone, start gentle stretching as recommended by a health care professional. Stay within pain limits. Hold each stretch for about 10 seconds and repeat 6 times. Repeat stretches 4 to 6 times during the day.

                    Strengthening – Begin strengthening exercises for your calf muscles as recommended by a health care professional. This is very important to guard against further problems.

                    Prevention
                    To reduce the chance that you will strain a calf muscle:

                    Keep your calf muscles strong so they can absorb the energy of sudden physical stress.
                    After a short warm-up period, stretch out your calf muscles before physical activity.
                    Learn the proper technique for exercise and sporting activities. This will decrease stress on all your muscles, including your calf muscles.

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                    • #11
                      This is 2 years in a row that he has been hurt!

                      I just really hope he isn't a ''Hurtbody'' because we need all the WR we have man

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