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Jarvis Moss in Arizona.

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  • The Duanimal
    replied
    Originally posted by stnzed View Post
    All I know is that I can drink a lot more beer at sea level (And Vegas) than I can in Denver ....
    I had to go to Dallas for a night for work. I drank a case of beer that night.

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  • ColRockies_5
    replied
    Originally posted by stnzed View Post
    All I know is that I can drink a lot more beer at sea level (And Vegas) than I can in Denver ....
    hahaha

    Leave a comment:


  • stnzed
    replied
    All I know is that I can drink a lot more beer at sea level (And Vegas) than I can in Denver ....

    Leave a comment:


  • dlewis76
    replied
    Originally posted by aaronheeb View Post
    being a graduate student in biology i figured i could shed some light on this. Also coming from southern california (sea level) to Colorado (5000 ft+) i have experienced this this whole thing first hand...

    First of all... Your body makes more red blood cells which then can grab more oxygen and transport it to where it needs to go. You don't make more hemoglobin, you just make more red blood cells which have the hemoglobin and myoglobin which carry oxygen. At one mile above sea level the air has approx 17% less oxygen content then @ sea level... So with that cleared up, i moved out to colorado to go to school and to see my beloved broncos. Walking around town for the first couple of weeks you dont really notice it (some people contend that you do, but if you are a healthy person, it really makes little difference) But then after about a month of being here i joined a pick up soccer game. After about 15 min of running, i was dying on the floor. I couldn't breathe. At this point i felt it. Two weeks later i played again and i was 1000x better.

    Your kidneys will start pumping out erytropoeitin which is a hormone that will increase RBC level once it realizes that your current situation isnt cutting it. It will adjust it accordingly and within two weeks you will be compensated (this is why professional runners will train @ high altitude so they will have high RBC levels which will keep your stamina up). So this garbage of Moss not being acclimated to the altitude after being here all camp is retarded. The altitude isnt the issue. The altitude is an issue for people that are flying in on friday or saturday, not exercising and then playing on sunday. We do get an advantage, but you play here for a week and you will be just fine...

    The issue is him having to deal with NFL offensive linemen and not being acclimated to 320 pound double teams. Not altitude...
    I also wanted to say that my dog is bigger than yours. Peace.

    Leave a comment:


  • dlewis76
    replied
    Originally posted by aaronheeb View Post
    being a graduate student in biology i figured i could shed some light on this. Also coming from southern california (sea level) to Colorado (5000 ft+) i have experienced this this whole thing first hand...

    First of all... Your body makes more red blood cells which then can grab more oxygen and transport it to where it needs to go. You don't make more hemoglobin, you just make more red blood cells which have the hemoglobin and myoglobin which carry oxygen. At one mile above sea level the air has approx 17% less oxygen content then @ sea level... So with that cleared up, i moved out to colorado to go to school and to see my beloved broncos. Walking around town for the first couple of weeks you dont really notice it (some people contend that you do, but if you are a healthy person, it really makes little difference) But then after about a month of being here i joined a pick up soccer game. After about 15 min of running, i was dying on the floor. I couldn't breathe. At this point i felt it. Two weeks later i played again and i was 1000x better.

    Your kidneys will start pumping out erytropoeitin which is a hormone that will increase RBC level once it realizes that your current situation isnt cutting it. It will adjust it accordingly and within two weeks you will be compensated (this is why professional runners will train @ high altitude so they will have high RBC levels which will keep your stamina up). So this garbage of Moss not being acclimated to the altitude after being here all camp is retarded. The altitude isnt the issue. The altitude is an issue for people that are flying in on friday or saturday, not exercising and then playing on sunday. We do get an advantage, but you play here for a week and you will be just fine...

    The issue is him having to deal with NFL offensive linemen and not being acclimated to 320 pound double teams. Not altitude...
    Hgb is bound RBC's, for simplicity I said hgb and not RBC's, so I apologize. I know about erythropoetin (which also happens to be a substance that athletes will take (different issue) to make more RBC's, hence more hgb (and more O2 carrying capacity) but why get so detailed. I didn't mean to get in a pissing match with you, just wanted to give a simple explanation. I could go on about anesthetics, partial pressures, etc at sea level vs Denver, but why?
    Last edited by dlewis76; 09-06-2007, 01:22 AM.

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  • thehorsesmouth
    replied
    so he was a first round talent cuz he has Decent speed and length????????????????/

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  • Dream
    replied
    Is it really that hard to explain?

    Jarvis Moss for the most part was a part-time player in college. He's coming from an elevation very low, to somewhere very high. He had an injury riddled college career and has not been able to work out or get into optimum shape until this past off-season. It'll take some getting used to. He'll be fine.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hawgdriver
    replied
    Originally posted by aaronheeb View Post
    i would agree with this... it would be nice if our defensive end can bench more than our quarterback...
    Yes, that will be key for the 3rd quarter intermission bench press contests they always have...

    Please end the physiology lectures!!! Make it stop!!!

    Some guys take plays off...some don't. I think Moss is the latter, which is why he looked whupped. I don't think he's a 'year away' or whatever, either. I think he can be an impact player out the gate, at least situationally. Just let him prove himself to you between the snap and the whistle in real NFL games...for better or worse.

    Leave a comment:


  • aaronheeb
    replied
    Originally posted by Broncosinindy View Post
    I would say Moss needs to get as much time with Rich Tutten as he possibly can. he needs to work on his strength imagine him with Dooms strength and pass rush moves.
    i would agree with this... it would be nice if our defensive end can bench more than our quarterback...

    Leave a comment:


  • Broncosinindy
    replied
    I would say Moss needs to get as much time with Rich Tutten as he possibly can. he needs to work on his strength imagine him with Dooms strength and pass rush moves.

    Leave a comment:


  • aaronheeb
    replied
    Originally posted by dlewis76 View Post
    Your body starts making extra hemaglobin (which carries oxygen) within 2-3 days when exposed to higher altitudes. It does not take months for the human body to aclimate to the higher altitude. I did not see the game, so it is hard to speculate. Maybe more of a transition from college to pros.
    being a graduate student in biology i figured i could shed some light on this. Also coming from southern california (sea level) to Colorado (5000 ft+) i have experienced this this whole thing first hand...

    First of all... Your body makes more red blood cells which then can grab more oxygen and transport it to where it needs to go. You don't make more hemoglobin, you just make more red blood cells which have the hemoglobin and myoglobin which carry oxygen. At one mile above sea level the air has approx 17% less oxygen content then @ sea level... So with that cleared up, i moved out to colorado to go to school and to see my beloved broncos. Walking around town for the first couple of weeks you dont really notice it (some people contend that you do, but if you are a healthy person, it really makes little difference) But then after about a month of being here i joined a pick up soccer game. After about 15 min of running, i was dying on the floor. I couldn't breathe. At this point i felt it. Two weeks later i played again and i was 1000x better.

    Your kidneys will start pumping out erytropoeitin which is a hormone that will increase RBC level once it realizes that your current situation isnt cutting it. It will adjust it accordingly and within two weeks you will be compensated (this is why professional runners will train @ high altitude so they will have high RBC levels which will keep your stamina up). So this garbage of Moss not being acclimated to the altitude after being here all camp is retarded. The altitude isnt the issue. The altitude is an issue for people that are flying in on friday or saturday, not exercising and then playing on sunday. We do get an advantage, but you play here for a week and you will be just fine...

    The issue is him having to deal with NFL offensive linemen and not being acclimated to 320 pound double teams. Not altitude...

    Leave a comment:


  • JoRo
    replied
    One thing that I have experienced with football is that defense is far more tiring than offense. Every single play you go hard on defense takes a lot out of you, whereas as an Olinemen you only need to neutralize the other player to technically win. I donno if this works as strongly in the pros, but thats been my experience... and if that is the case the fact that he LOOKED tired all the time but still played hard is a great thing, cuz it means that he worked his butt off but had the stamina to keep going

    Leave a comment:


  • lex
    replied
    Originally posted by dlewis76 View Post
    Your body starts making extra hemaglobin (which carries oxygen) within 2-3 days when exposed to higher altitudes. It does not take months for the human body to aclimate to the higher altitude. I did not see the game, so it is hard to speculate. Maybe more of a transition from college to pros.
    Originally posted by Exxon View Post
    Although your explanation maybe textbook, and surely scientifically backed by repeated expirimentation, I still doubt its validity. I think though I only have anectdotal evidence, that acclimation takes a longer time then simply the time it takes for hemoglobin to adapt.

    First of all there is a mental aspect to getting used to strenuous excercise in high altitude. If your not used to sucking air as much as you have your whole life. The oxygen is of a lower molality in this altitude in comparision to sea level.

    Any denver native, and even natives of any high elevation locale, will tell you the altitude change has less of an effect on them when they return to their homes of origin then typical visitors. That is to say, athlete x moves from say mexico city to a coastal town. Competes at coastal town, when they return to their home city they are able to pick up with less of an acclimation time, and indeed, less drastic effects of acclimation, then say another athlete that has never been above sea level.

    In addition to the mental aspect there could hypothetically be longterm aspects in the alveoli and hemoglobin of the body that are as yet un researched found in people who were long term acclimated to elevation vs your standard run of the mill 2-3 days hemoglobin argument which you so elegantly stated.

    Any scientist worth their salt will say we know nothing about anything, and I believe your post to be an example of one such mindset. More study is definitly needed into the aspects of acclimation before one can make such a blanket post assuming everyone is completely acclimated within three days. Even after extensive study there will still be more mysterys revealed by smarter men then us in the distant future that will revolutionize the current model of biomechanics.

    Also the difference between college and NFL shape is a big one. Pair that with the ambiguitys of acclimation, psychological strength, and a persons individual genome, and there are simply too many unknowns to ever make a blanket statement as the one you just made. It would be nice if everything were black and white, but it never is...
    I like jello.

    Leave a comment:


  • Exxon
    replied
    Originally posted by dlewis76 View Post
    Your body starts making extra hemaglobin (which carries oxygen) within 2-3 days when exposed to higher altitudes. It does not take months for the human body to aclimate to the higher altitude. I did not see the game, so it is hard to speculate. Maybe more of a transition from college to pros.
    Although your explanation maybe textbook, and surely scientifically backed by repeated expirimentation, I still doubt its validity. I think though I only have anectdotal evidence, that acclimation takes a longer time then simply the time it takes for hemoglobin to adapt.

    First of all there is a mental aspect to getting used to strenuous excercise in high altitude. If your not used to sucking air as much as you have your whole life. The oxygen is of a lower molality in this altitude in comparision to sea level.

    Any denver native, and even natives of any high elevation locale, will tell you the altitude change has less of an effect on them when they return to their homes of origin then typical visitors. That is to say, athlete x moves from say mexico city to a coastal town. Competes at coastal town, when they return to their home city they are able to pick up with less of an acclimation time, and indeed, less drastic effects of acclimation, then say another athlete that has never been above sea level.

    In addition to the mental aspect there could hypothetically be longterm aspects in the alveoli and hemoglobin of the body that are as yet un researched found in people who were long term acclimated to elevation vs your standard run of the mill 2-3 days hemoglobin argument which you so elegantly stated.

    Any scientist worth their salt will say we know nothing about anything, and I believe your post to be an example of one such mindset. More study is definitly needed into the aspects of acclimation before one can make such a blanket post assuming everyone is completely acclimated within three days. Even after extensive study there will still be more mysterys revealed by smarter men then us in the distant future that will revolutionize the current model of biomechanics.

    Also the difference between college and NFL shape is a big one. Pair that with the ambiguitys of acclimation, psychological strength, and a persons individual genome, and there are simply too many unknowns to ever make a blanket statement as the one you just made. It would be nice if everything were black and white, but it never is...

    Leave a comment:


  • antipas
    replied
    Originally posted by MindField View Post
    Well, we'll see how it plays out in the year to come.

    I still say we Drafted the wrong guy....but that's just me.
    I'm glad we got Moss! I think the number of players we got for the D-line and the quality, we made out pretty good. Yeah we could have taken a safety and I think that would have been a good pick too. But we got who we got! And I'm glad.

    Leave a comment:

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