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  • Florence Brings ‘Physical Presence’ to Secondary

    When cornerback Drayton Florence signed with Denver, he said it was all about timing.

    The Broncos are coming off a strong defensive season, quarterback Peyton Manning has joined the team and Florence has a chance to compete for a championship in his 10th NFL season.

    “I’ve got a great group of DBs I’ve been working with and a lot of competition back there,” Florence said Tuesday during OTAs. “So I’ve enjoyed it so far. A little competition is good for everybody. The situation that they brought me in, to compete for a starting job, possibly playing nickel, is something that I thought was a great opportunity for me. With Peyton Manning being here and it being my 10th year in the league, I’m trying to win a Super Bowl ring. I’ve enjoyed it so far, everything is going smooth. I’m getting comfortable, getting settled in and into the community, and things are going pretty good so far.”

    When asked if he’s expecting to play the nickel cornerback position, Florence made it clear that everyone — with one exception — is battling for a starting spot.

    “(Head) Coach (John) Fox told me that if I come here, everyone is going to be competing,” he said. “Nobody in the secondary has a job except for Champ Bailey, which is obvious, and everyone else is out there competing. That is what we’re going to do. All the good teams have competition at every position and that is how you build a successful team.”

    Florence spent the past three seasons with Buffalo after one year with Jacksonville and five with San Diego.

    The cornerback played under Broncos Defensive Coordinator Jack Del Rio in Jacksonville, and he said a little of the defensive scheme is familiar, but there’s plenty different, and the club is in the early stages of installation.
    Regardless of the scheme, Florence knows what he and the rest of the defense has to do this season.

    “Football is football — it hasn’t changed in one hundred years and it’s not going to change,” he said. “It’s about tackling the football, getting turnovers, and this year since we have one of the better quarterbacks in the league, turnovers are going to be a thing that we are really focusing on. If we can get Peyton as many opportunities to go down and get us six points, it’s going to put us in the win column a lot this year.”

    The 10th-year pro has 17 interceptions for his career — including three last season, one of which he returned for a touchdown.

 It marked the second interception return for a touchdown in his career.

    In addition, Florence has accumulated 441 tackles, 87 passes defensed, three forced fumbles and four fumble recoveries — one for another defensive touchdown — in his career.

    Even with nine years of NFL experience, the veteran said he won’t hesitate to learn from fellow vets like cornerback Champ Bailey and safety Mike Adams, to “take a few of the things that they do well and put it in my toolbox.”

    And he doesn’t feel he’s slowing down.

    “The older you get the smarter you should be getting,” Florence said. “You’ve seen a lot, nothing should really be new. Week-in and week-out you should know how to prepare for teams. Like I said, being around veteran guys is only going to make me better, guys like Champ Bailey and Mike Adams in the secondary. In this business you have to keep improving, and if you don’t, you all know how that goes.”

    Florence said he brings “a physical presence” at the corner position, and prides himself on getting his hands on receivers at the line of scrimmage.

    With so many other talented players on both sides of the ball, Florence is excited for what 2012 could bring.

    “The opportunity came up for me where I had a chance to come out here to Denver and play with Champ Bailey — obviously a guy I’ve looked up to my whole career — and then Peyton Manning,” he said. “So it was an easy decision for me to make.”

    http://blog.denverbroncos.com/denver...-to-secondary/


  • #2
    Originally posted by ERoyal248 View Post
    When cornerback Drayton Florence signed with Denver, he said it was all about timing.

    The Broncos are coming off a strong defensive season, quarterback Peyton Manning has joined the team and Florence has a chance to compete for a championship in his 10th NFL season.

    “I’ve got a great group of DBs I’ve been working with and a lot of competition back there,” Florence said Tuesday during OTAs. “So I’ve enjoyed it so far. A little competition is good for everybody. The situation that they brought me in, to compete for a starting job, possibly playing nickel, is something that I thought was a great opportunity for me. With Peyton Manning being here and it being my 10th year in the league, I’m trying to win a Super Bowl ring. I’ve enjoyed it so far, everything is going smooth. I’m getting comfortable, getting settled in and into the community, and things are going pretty good so far.”

    When asked if he’s expecting to play the nickel cornerback position, Florence made it clear that everyone — with one exception — is battling for a starting spot.

    “(Head) Coach (John) Fox told me that if I come here, everyone is going to be competing,” he said. “Nobody in the secondary has a job except for Champ Bailey, which is obvious, and everyone else is out there competing. That is what we’re going to do. All the good teams have competition at every position and that is how you build a successful team.”

    Florence spent the past three seasons with Buffalo after one year with Jacksonville and five with San Diego.

    The cornerback played under Broncos Defensive Coordinator Jack Del Rio in Jacksonville, and he said a little of the defensive scheme is familiar, but there’s plenty different, and the club is in the early stages of installation.
    Regardless of the scheme, Florence knows what he and the rest of the defense has to do this season.

    “Football is football — it hasn’t changed in one hundred years and it’s not going to change,” he said. “It’s about tackling the football, getting turnovers, and this year since we have one of the better quarterbacks in the league, turnovers are going to be a thing that we are really focusing on. If we can get Peyton as many opportunities to go down and get us six points, it’s going to put us in the win column a lot this year.”

    The 10th-year pro has 17 interceptions for his career — including three last season, one of which he returned for a touchdown.

 It marked the second interception return for a touchdown in his career.

    In addition, Florence has accumulated 441 tackles, 87 passes defensed, three forced fumbles and four fumble recoveries — one for another defensive touchdown — in his career.

    Even with nine years of NFL experience, the veteran said he won’t hesitate to learn from fellow vets like cornerback Champ Bailey and safety Mike Adams, to “take a few of the things that they do well and put it in my toolbox.”

    And he doesn’t feel he’s slowing down.

    “The older you get the smarter you should be getting,” Florence said. “You’ve seen a lot, nothing should really be new. Week-in and week-out you should know how to prepare for teams. Like I said, being around veteran guys is only going to make me better, guys like Champ Bailey and Mike Adams in the secondary. In this business you have to keep improving, and if you don’t, you all know how that goes.”

    Florence said he brings “a physical presence” at the corner position, and prides himself on getting his hands on receivers at the line of scrimmage.

    With so many other talented players on both sides of the ball, Florence is excited for what 2012 could bring.

    “The opportunity came up for me where I had a chance to come out here to Denver and play with Champ Bailey — obviously a guy I’ve looked up to my whole career — and then Peyton Manning,” he said. “So it was an easy decision for me to make.”

    http://blog.denverbroncos.com/denver...-to-secondary/

    I've been saying this to folks for a while now. The only way to beat high-powered offenses like New England is to smash them in the mouth at the line of scrimmage and completely disrupt the timing of their offense. It may not seem like much, but that extra second or two for our pass rush is the difference between a game-winning defensive stand or a game losing touchdown dagger. Is it just me or do most defensive backs under utilize that 5 yard limit? You've got 5 yards, as long as you don't attempt to injure why not put wideouts on their backside.
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    • #3
      Originally posted by ERoyal248 View Post
      When cornerback Drayton Florence signed with Denver, he said it was all about timing.

      The Broncos are coming off a strong defensive season, quarterback Peyton Manning has joined the team and Florence has a chance to compete for a championship in his 10th NFL season.

      “I’ve got a great group of DBs I’ve been working with and a lot of competition back there,” Florence said Tuesday during OTAs. “So I’ve enjoyed it so far. A little competition is good for everybody. The situation that they brought me in, to compete for a starting job, possibly playing nickel, is something that I thought was a great opportunity for me. With Peyton Manning being here and it being my 10th year in the league, I’m trying to win a Super Bowl ring. I’ve enjoyed it so far, everything is going smooth. I’m getting comfortable, getting settled in and into the community, and things are going pretty good so far.”

      When asked if he’s expecting to play the nickel cornerback position, Florence made it clear that everyone — with one exception — is battling for a starting spot.

      “(Head) Coach (John) Fox told me that if I come here, everyone is going to be competing,” he said. “Nobody in the secondary has a job except for Champ Bailey, which is obvious, and everyone else is out there competing. That is what we’re going to do. All the good teams have competition at every position and that is how you build a successful team.”

      Florence spent the past three seasons with Buffalo after one year with Jacksonville and five with San Diego.

      The cornerback played under Broncos Defensive Coordinator Jack Del Rio in Jacksonville, and he said a little of the defensive scheme is familiar, but there’s plenty different, and the club is in the early stages of installation.
      Regardless of the scheme, Florence knows what he and the rest of the defense has to do this season.

      “Football is football — it hasn’t changed in one hundred years and it’s not going to change,” he said. “It’s about tackling the football, getting turnovers, and this year since we have one of the better quarterbacks in the league, turnovers are going to be a thing that we are really focusing on. If we can get Peyton as many opportunities to go down and get us six points, it’s going to put us in the win column a lot this year.”

      The 10th-year pro has 17 interceptions for his career — including three last season, one of which he returned for a touchdown.

 It marked the second interception return for a touchdown in his career.

      In addition, Florence has accumulated 441 tackles, 87 passes defensed, three forced fumbles and four fumble recoveries — one for another defensive touchdown — in his career.

      Even with nine years of NFL experience, the veteran said he won’t hesitate to learn from fellow vets like cornerback Champ Bailey and safety Mike Adams, to “take a few of the things that they do well and put it in my toolbox.”

      And he doesn’t feel he’s slowing down.

      “The older you get the smarter you should be getting,” Florence said. “You’ve seen a lot, nothing should really be new. Week-in and week-out you should know how to prepare for teams. Like I said, being around veteran guys is only going to make me better, guys like Champ Bailey and Mike Adams in the secondary. In this business you have to keep improving, and if you don’t, you all know how that goes.”

      Florence said he brings “a physical presence” at the corner position, and prides himself on getting his hands on receivers at the line of scrimmage.

      With so many other talented players on both sides of the ball, Florence is excited for what 2012 could bring.

      “The opportunity came up for me where I had a chance to come out here to Denver and play with Champ Bailey — obviously a guy I’ve looked up to my whole career — and then Peyton Manning,” he said. “So it was an easy decision for me to make.”

      http://blog.denverbroncos.com/denver...-to-secondary/

      Hopefully he can be someone we can line up against Gronk (still double him) but at least Florence should be able to get his hands on him a little

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Buckin' Bronco View Post
        I've been saying this to folks for a while now. The only way to beat high-powered offenses like New England is to smash them in the mouth at the line of scrimmage and completely disrupt the timing of their offense. It may not seem like much, but that extra second or two for our pass rush is the difference between a game-winning defensive stand or a game losing touchdown dagger. Is it just me or do most defensive backs under utilize that 5 yard limit? You've got 5 yards, as long as you don't attempt to injure why not put wideouts on their backside.


        i agree but i think their hesitant to do so because of some of the BS calls that have happened in the past

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Buckin' Bronco View Post
          I've been saying this to folks for a while now. The only way to beat high-powered offenses like New England is to smash them in the mouth at the line of scrimmage and completely disrupt the timing of their offense. It may not seem like much, but that extra second or two for our pass rush is the difference between a game-winning defensive stand or a game losing touchdown dagger. Is it just me or do most defensive backs under utilize that 5 yard limit? You've got 5 yards, as long as you don't attempt to injure why not put wideouts on their backside.
          Exactly, when we played them, our CB's played 5-10 yds off, made no sense.

          The Giants in the SB did that, they jammed them at the LOS, and basically everything you said. You gotta be physical with them, and frustrate them.

          And sometimes they don't b/c of the stupid rules where it is now.

          Comment


          • #6
            I am no expert by any means but I think they back off based on the coverage that is called. I think they also backoff the fast recievers as to not get beat long because our safeties were either slow or inexperienced.

            We have not had a strong secondary in so many years I think they would backoff a little and it costs them everytime. Now with some veterans in the secondary it wouldn't surprise me that they do exactly what you are talking about and jam at the line.

            This year is going to be so exciting. Peyton controlling the long drives for TD's and our D smacking our opponents in the mouth and taking the ball back.
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            Samparnell - Adopted Coach & Mentor
            2016 Adopted Bronco - Derek Wolfe
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            • #7
              DBs only jam at LOS in Cover 1/0 or combo and the DB jamming is in man. DBs in zone don't jam because they drop, read and break. Man coverage should always line up inside the receiver and force him to the outside, run hip to hip and watch for when he turns his head to look for the ball. The receiver's eyes will tell the DB when to look for the ball.
              "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by samparnell View Post
                DBs only jam at LOS in Cover 1/0 or combo and the DB jamming is in man. DBs in zone don't jam because they drop, read and break. Man coverage should always line up inside the receiver and force him to the outside, run hip to hip and watch for when he turns his head to look for the ball. The receiver's eyes will tell the DB when to look for the ball.
                Not entirely true ...

                You can press in cover 2 as well as in 3-bail

                Often in cover 2, you have to press because if the WR gets free release outside the hash, there's no way your safety can get there, also you might as well because you're staying put anyways (no risk of getting burned if you get bad/no hand placement) which obviously shouldn't happen if you know how to press (something I use to pride myself on) get the first hand on em for control then hit them hard with the second n get in front of the WR's route (getting a good jam can take real patience)...also disguise your jam by looking as though you're gonna bail at the last second by backing up or waiting till the WR has made his first break (within 3-5 yds) and is that little bit of off-balance so you can gain leverage (something Revis does so well)

                Also 3-bail is often used as a disguise as normally in cover 3, the CB's aren't going to press so if you do get a quick shove n redirect it can throw the QB off because it looks like cover 1/or 0 or even 2

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                • #9
                  ^ just to note Champ is also very good with having patience on his jam to get leverage ...watch him, he usually waits for the WR to make his first break to one side (off-balance, gain leverage) n then hits him as hard as he can ...

                  His technique in press is just as good as Revis, Revis is just strong as hell n without a doubt the best CB in the game when it comes to jamming at the LOS

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by #24 Next Champ View Post
                    ^ just to note Champ is also very good with having patience on his jam to get leverage ...watch him, he usually waits for the WR to make his first break to one side (off-balance, gain leverage) n then hits him as hard as he can ...

                    His technique in press is just as good as Revis, Revis is just strong as hell n without a doubt the best CB in the game when it comes to jamming at the LOS
                    I'll beg to differ, IMO, Revis is great in the press, but Nnamdi is better. Revis just has better ball skills and probably better hips than Nnamdi, but there's no way I'm giving it to Revis over Nnamdi.
                    Fightin' Texas Aggie c/o '16

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by samparnell View Post
                      DBs only jam at LOS in Cover 1/0 or combo and the DB jamming is in man. DBs in zone don't jam because they drop, read and break. Man coverage should always line up inside the receiver and force him to the outside, run hip to hip and watch for when he turns his head to look for the ball. The receiver's eyes will tell the DB when to look for the ball.
                      Are you forgetting one of the most common defensive schemes? The Tampa 2 is notorious for being physical at the line, yet the corners don't play man most of the time, they play the flats.
                      Fightin' Texas Aggie c/o '16

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BroncoooJohnson View Post
                        I'll beg to differ, IMO, Revis is great in the press, but Nnamdi is better. Revis just has better ball skills and probably better hips than Nnamdi, but there's no way I'm giving it to Revis over Nnamdi.
                        Sorry bro, I'll respectfully disagree ...

                        Nnamdi has a good jam (n long arms which helps) but he's too big n stiff to bend n use leverage ...he can't get his hands on the quicker guys...

                        Revis imo is the best CB in the game when it comes to physicality at the LOS ...

                        Still take Champ overall though...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Champ is great at everything, he allows you to run any scheme

                          We played off because we played more cover 1 last year
                          I think we are going to a press zone scheme with more coverage over the top

                          Im excited about our defense this year
                          Theoretically if Doom and Von can put the heat on if we build a lead, it should lead to more turnovers than we had last year
                          Last edited by Br0nc0Buster; 05-26-2012, 01:56 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BroncoooJohnson View Post
                            Are you forgetting one of the most common defensive schemes? The Tampa 2 is notorious for being physical at the line, yet the corners don't play man most of the time, they play the flats.
                            Go ahead and call Tampa 2. Motion from from Pro to Twins will cause a rotation in the secondary. If Z's motion takes him outside X, who is the CB going to jam? He can't jam both. If he jams one, the other gets a clean release and the flat is open for Flare/Wheel route. It also opens up backside routes. In a tight formation with two off receivers, it causes additional problems.

                            When a zone defender jams, he is occupied and can't manage his zone of responsibility on a consistent basis. It's unsound defense. Sound defensive coverage technique is to jam when in cover 1/0 or in combo man. It isn't as easy as some seem to think. It's riskier for a zone defender than for man.

                            DBs in Cover 1/0 are lined up inside their man. Zone defenders aren't usually. Jamming from the outside allows an inside release which is not usually desirable especially in a split front with Cover 2/Tampa 2 as the call. Is there a DB in the NFL who can successfully jam any receiver all the time? I'm sure there are some who can't jam well most of the time.

                            I can understand a D getting burned when O runs against a blitz call or bites too hard on PAP, but not as a result of poor technique.
                            Last edited by samparnell; 05-26-2012, 02:34 PM.
                            "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by samparnell View Post
                              Go ahead and call Tampa 2. Motion from from Pro to Twins will cause a rotation in the secondary. If Z's motion takes him outside X, who is the CB going to jam? He can't jam both. If he jams one, the other gets a clean release and the flat is open for Flare/Wheel route. It also opens up backside routes. In a tight formation with two off receivers, it causes additional problems.

                              When a zone defender jams, he is occupied and can't manage his zone of responsibility on a consistent basis. It's unsound defense. Sound defensive coverage technique is to jam when in cover 1/0 or in combo man. It isn't as easy as some seem to think. It's riskier for a zone defender than for man.

                              DBs in Cover 1/0 are lined up inside their man. Zone defenders aren't usually. Jamming from the outside allows an inside release which is not usually desirable especially in a split front with Cover 2/Tampa 2 as the call. Is there a DB in the NFL
                              who can successfully jam any receiver all the time?
                              It's not risky in cover2...

                              Everything you just mentioned shouldn't be a factor because the safety should be calling out the correct coverages BASED on formations...if there's motion u gameplan to that ...

                              I.e. at my school if we were in "2 check" (cover 2 press) n had a motion man (depending on side) we'd check to "3 Zorro" where the motion-side CB maintains his "2 press" n we roll a cover 3 coverage over to that side (slight variations were always worked in based on team's tendencies n formations during the wk of practice) but you get the jist ...

                              I ran that in HS...I'm sure the pros (who have so much time to dedicate to it have an ample amount of "checks" n audibles for motions

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