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Scouting the Broncos vets

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  • Scouting the Broncos vets

    - Scouting the Broncos vets: Chris Harris -

    "Athletic Ability: Harris is a quick player with very loose hips, quick acceleration and decent straight line speed, Harris has all the agility needed to play corner. Harris' biggest issue arises with his size. Due to his small frame and stature Harris can very easily be handled by bigger receivers or tight ends.

    Football Sense: Harris's ability to watch the quarterback is quite excellent and it pays off consistently. His skill at reading quarterbacks is quite strong which is one reason Harris excels in the slot so well, it allows him to make plays across the field more easily. He also has a strong sense for sensing rushing lanes and flying to them.

    Read & React: Harris has excellent reflexes, rapidly adjusting to what he sees from the quarterback or from the receiver he is shadowing. Perhaps his greatest strength, he rarely makes mistakes in man coverage and in zone his ability to track most quarterbacks eyes and follow the play as it develops." ...

    http://www.milehighreport.com/2014/6...s-chris-harris

  • #2
    - Scouting the Broncos Vets: Safety Rahim Moore -

    "Athletic Ability: Moore lacks elite speed, strength and size but still possesses reliable talent in those areas. Rahim has solid acceleration, but isn't a decisive defender and rarely reaches his top speed even if he's chasing down a receiver who beat him.

    Football Sense: Moore lacks that knack of elite safeties who are able to read, diagnose and then attack an offense, often times knowing before the snap what is going to happen. Having said that his strength comes from playing within the scheme, the coaches aren't able to have him on the field and make his own decisions, rather he's at his best in a tight, rigid system.

    Read & React: Possibly the biggest weakness in Rahim Moore's game, being able to read and react to what the offense is doing, isn't one of his strong suits. More often than I care to admit Coach Harris kept pointing out how the receivers were only running 5-7 yard routes but Moore kept dropping further and further back. Often times this is a sign of a safety who would rather drop back instead of stepping into the play, we aren't saying he should leave his zone, just don't be afraid to prepare." ...

    http://www.milehighreport.com/2014/2...ty-rahim-moore

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    • #3
      - Scouting the Broncos Vets: Linebacker Nate Irving -

      "Athletic Ability: Irving is a well built linebacker who can hit hard and accelerates quickly in small spaces which helps him close the gap ans well as off the snap as a pass rusher. But despite a quick first step and good size, he lacks the strength to break any form of blocking, seeing all his success when unblocked.

      Football Sense: Nate is more of an aggressive player than a thinker, attacking the play immediately without looking for if it might have some complexity to it. Because of this he was an utter failure when it came to defending draw runs and play action, but was successful in run defense when the play went his way.

      Read and React: As mentioned earlier Irving lacks any real football sense other than what is in front of him. While he does watch the quarterback or running back with his eyes he never makes adjustments based off of what he sees." ...

      http://www.milehighreport.com/2014/5...er-nate-irving

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      • #4
        - Scouting the Broncos Vets: David Bruton -

        "Athletic Ability: Bruton is exceptionally athletic in terms of strength and speed and he is the biggest and fastest defensive back on the roster. His fastest 40 meter dash time was recorded at 4.32 and he benched 225 pounds 19 times at the combine, very good for a defensive back. This helps him to have the skill set to be a successful safety against the run and at playing deep passing defense.

        Football Sense: On almost every one of Bruton's coverage snaps where he dropped into deep coverage he showed solid skill at sitting and watching the quarterback and making his move at the right time, rarely getting looked off by the quarterbacks eyes like he would early in his career. He still isn't perfect but after four years he's developed a strong feel for reading offenses and doesn't bite on play action and trick plays often.

        Read & React: This was a tough area to grade, David struggled at times reading and reacting to mis-direction by the offense in the run game and it cost him on a number of plays. His indecisiveness was apparent during these plays. On the other hand when he was reading and reacting to the quarterback it was a different story as watching him play in those situations was impressive to scout as you could see his head move and track the quarterback’s eyes and they go through their progression." ...

        http://www.milehighreport.com/2013/7...s-david-bruton

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        • #5
          thanks for these!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Emily Diana View Post
            - Scouting the Broncos Vets: Safety Rahim Moore -

            "Athletic Ability: Moore lacks elite speed, strength and size but still possesses reliable talent in those areas. Rahim has solid acceleration, but isn't a decisive defender and rarely reaches his top speed even if he's chasing down a receiver who beat him.

            Football Sense: Moore lacks that knack of elite safeties who are able to read, diagnose and then attack an offense, often times knowing before the snap what is going to happen. Having said that his strength comes from playing within the scheme, the coaches aren't able to have him on the field and make his own decisions, rather he's at his best in a tight, rigid system.

            Read & React: Possibly the biggest weakness in Rahim Moore's game, being able to read and react to what the offense is doing, isn't one of his strong suits. More often than I care to admit Coach Harris kept pointing out how the receivers were only running 5-7 yard routes but Moore kept dropping further and further back. Often times this is a sign of a safety who would rather drop back instead of stepping into the play, we aren't saying he should leave his zone, just don't be afraid to prepare." ...

            http://www.milehighreport.com/2014/2...ty-rahim-moore
            This summation of his play reaffirms my position that we should move on from R Moore.

            It appears the Ravens playoff game loss really messed with his head.

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