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LB Brandon Marshall and Denver Police Chief meet over Anthem protest.

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  • LB Brandon Marshall and Denver Police Chief meet over Anthem protest.

    http://www.nbcnews.com/news/sports/b...rotest-n647766

    Denver Broncos linebacker Brandon Marshall wants to build bridges with police after becoming the latest black athlete to stir controversy for silently protesting during the national anthem.

    Denver Police Chief Robert White met with Marshall for close to an hour Tuesday morning to discuss how policing affects people of color — and to also find common ground.

    "This was an opportunity, to use a football analogy, to move the ball forward," White later told reporters.

    White stressed that he does not specifically endorse the anthem protest, but was open to speaking with Marshall because of the chance to create dialogue and describe the "good work" that officers of the Denver Police Department are doing.

    "His kneeling was to speak to the injustices ... in our country," said the police chief, who is also black. "He also recognizes that most of the men and women in law enforcement are out doing the right thing every single day. It's that small percentage that's a challenge for our police department."

    Marshall has said taking a knee during the Bronco's season opener last week was meant to bring attention to racial oppression in America — coming after 49ers backup quarterback Colin Kaepernick began doing his own protest by sitting on the bench during the national anthem last month.

    Marshall and Kaepernick were fraternity brothers and teammates at the University of Nevada.

    Kaepernick was subject to an intense backlash for the move, and critics claimed it was insensitive to veterans — although many veterans later came out in support of him.

    Marshall has seen two companies yank endorsement deals so far and someone burned a shirt with his name in front of the Broncos' headquarters.

    White said Marshall peppered him with questions about why officers don't seem to be charged or indicted in controversial cop-involved deaths of black men and women.

    "My response is to Brandon, while many people, and maybe even you, Brandon, are asking why the officer got off when it appears he or she broke the law … the question that you're really asking is, 'Were those actions necessary?'" White said.

    The police chief added that he has offered to show Marshall police simulation programs so that he better understands the life and death situations cops are confronted with daily. For his part, White said, he realizes that fixing the problem of faulty policing will require cultivating a stronger relationship with residents.

    Marshall did not immediately comment about the meeting with White. He told The Associated Press on Monday that he plans to kneel again during the Broncos game against the Indianapolis Colts on Sunday.

    Two companies — a Colorado credit union and telecom provider Century Link — have dropped Marshall as a celebrity endorser. But hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons announced this week that he would "find the money" to hire the pro footballer in an endorsement deal for his prepaid debit card, the RushCard.

    "He is a great American hero/athlete," Simmons wrote on Instagram. "I am eternally grateful for his and other athletes courage in standing up against injustice."

  • #2
    The Denver Post also covered this story, with a much better article I may add.

    Brandon Marshall came equipped with a loosely formed plan and a laundry list of questions.

    For nearly an hour inside the Denver police administration building Tuesday, the Broncos linebacker met with Chief Robert White, peppering him with questions about local law enforcement, about recent incidents of police brutality nationwide, about officer-training methods, and about how, why and when police officers do what they do.

    White provided as many answers as he could. Then he reciprocated Marshall’s list of questions with a list of suggestions, specifically ways Marshall can work with the police department to effect change and fight racial injustices in local communities and beyond.

    The meeting was the first step after Marshall’s well-publicized kneel-down during the national anthem Thursday, ahead of the Broncos’ season-opening victory against the Carolina Panthers. It was another step to address the issue that San Francisco quarterback Colin Kaepernick and other players protested by sitting or kneeling during the national anthem in recent weeks.

    The protests have led to more backlash than positive feedback for the athletes, with Marshall’s loss of two endorsements and his being on the receiving end of hate-filled messages on social media.

    “There are a lot of people that will raise issues and be negative and be what my kids call just ‘haters,’ no matter what you do and let it go at that,” White said Tuesday, shortly after his meeting with Marshall. “(Marshall) has issues and he has questions as it relates to what we’re doing. He acknowledged some of those challenges, and he wants to do something about it. And part of doing something about it is going to the source of where you think some of those issues are.”

    White didn’t offer his opinion on Marshall’s method of protest but said he respects his right to do so peacefully.

    “Do I support him kneeling? I support his right along with the other thousands of individuals who have demonstrated in our city, during the course of my four years here, to express their First Amendment rights,” White said. “Whether I agree or disagree I think is totally irrelevant. I think as a chief and as a law enforcement person, I have a responsibility to protect the rights of everyone as it relates to the constitution and the (First) Amendment. I respect his right to exercise his First Amendment.”

    What comes next is uncertain.

    “We talked about ‘OK, obviously you taking this stance — exercising your First Amendment rights, acknowledging that there’s an issue that is important to you, which he believes it is — is great,’ ” White said. ” ‘So now what are you going to do? Now that you’ve acknowledged the issue, what are you going to do?’ Part of that for him is having this conversation.”

    White and Marshall talked not only about the department but also about the broader, philosophical view on the “sanctity of life,” with White using a scene from the old police TV series “Hill Street Blues” to illustrate his department’s emphasis on valuing citizens lives and not just the legality of officers’ actions.

    White also provided Marshall three reports: The President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing Report; a report by Police Executive Research Forum, or PERF, which studies policing nationwide and for which White is on the board of directors; and a local report provided to Denver Mayor Michael Hancock that included suggested reforms for the Denver Police Department.

    “It became pretty clear to me that his kneeling was to speak to the injustices that he feels are going across in our country,” White said. “But I also think he recognizes — and we talked about this — that most of the men and women in law enforcement, and certainly those in Denver, are out doing the right thing every single day. And it’s that small percentage that is a challenge for our community (that) is a challenge for me.”

    In addition to providing reading material, White will offer Marshall a list of suggested ways he can work with the department to continue to effect change, to inch closer to that “endgame” Marshall has spoken of in recent days. One of those suggestions will include a ride-along with an officer. Another will be to test the department’s simulator used to train officers in “shoot” and “don’t shoot” scenarios. Another will be to continue to speak with local youths to encourage them to “make good decisions” and “not putting themselves in harm’s way.” (Shortly before their meeting, Marshall spoke to fourth-grade students at Fairview Elementary.)

    White said Marshall was “more than willing to continue to work with our police department,” but White left the door open for him to initiate the next step.

    “This was an opportunity, to use a football analogy, to ‘move the ball forward,’” White said. “We can never address the issues that we’re faced with in this country if, No. 1, we don’t have respect for the other side of the table and, No. 2, we can’t find some common ground to move forward. From my perspective, I wanted to hear what he had to say. But I also wanted to represent law enforcement from a positive perspective, but also acknowledge that we have problems and also assure him that we are aggressively trying to get our arms around those problems.”
    http://www.denverpost.com/2016/09/13...-robert-white/

    Comment


    • #3
      Good job for Chief White. Looks like he both challenged Marshall and supported him.
      sigpic

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      • #4
        Originally posted by EddieMac View Post
        Good job for Chief White. Looks like he both challenged Marshall and supported him.
        Was super proud of Marshall for going through with it and taking it seriously. Aside from a super star, he's a face of the community. And it's always good to see him do whats best for his team and the city of Denver even if his own views differ from the masses.

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        • #5
          And although I don't support the method....I applaud him taking it to a "do something" level.
          sigpic

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          • #6
            Amazing how the articles were written up. Which goes to my post the other day about how narratives are formed.

            I'm proud of Brandon and I hope something comes from this. Good on you Brandon.
            Adopted Bronco: DeMarcus Ware

            Comment


            • #7
              Respect that Marshall took his protest in another direction and had this discussion with the Chief.

              Positive change can occur by striving for those ideals that the Flag and Anthem represent.

              Going to be interesting to see how Marshall continues with his activism. Does he remain active? Does he consider the other side of the issues? Does he he speak out just as vocally in a balanced way? What message does he give to the kids he is speaking to?

              He has the opportunity to be a leader in our community. Will he take it?

              Comment


              • #8
                We had deleted this thread so that the mods could discuss some things.

                We would like to have a thread in an open forum so that those who do not have access to P&R can discuss this issue. Since a Bronco has joined the protest, it's gotten more of us involved.

                Now, here's where we need your help. Politics are not allowed in the open forums. This thread will remain here as long as it doesn't get too political. If we have to delete too many posts, the thread will unfortunately get merged with the one in P&R.

                Thank you for understanding and for your cooperation.
                Administrator

                Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage

                Lupus Awareness

                "a semicolon is used when an author could've chosen to end their sentence, but chose not to. The author is you and the sentence is your life ; "

                Comment


                • #9
                  btw I do want to comment about the Broncos franchise first...lets be honest other teams like the Patriots would bash their players and tell them to stop causing distractions...the Broncos not only support their players but the Broncos are helping Marshall find effective means to help push the ball forward on this issue in a way that is constructive and draws attention for the right reasons.

                  Man it is good to be a life long Bronco fan!

                  The police chief added that he has offered to show Marshall police simulation programs so that he better understands the life and death situations cops are confronted with daily. For his part, White said, he realizes that fixing the problem of faulty policing will require cultivating a stronger relationship with residents.
                  To quote the song and the many times I have herd this in Los Angeles...that part right there.

                  People on both sides need to stop being emotional and listen to each other and learn from each other.

                  Going to respect the forums and keep my comments appropriate. Maybe I will look in other areas of the forums for more detailed conversation.

                  I feel very strong about this topic. The idea of doing what we feel is right as long as we are not interfering with another person's ability to live their live freely if the very foundation of what this country is about imo.

                  “Do I support him kneeling? I support his right along with the other thousands of individuals who have demonstrated in our city, during the course of my four years here, to express their First Amendment rights,” White said. “Whether I agree or disagree I think is totally irrelevant. I think as a chief and as a law enforcement person, I have a responsibility to protect the rights of everyone as it relates to the constitution and the (First) Amendment. I respect his right to exercise his First Amendment.”
                  Also feel strong about the topic at hand...I think it is a very complex issue and there are things imo no one is talking about.

                  It is good to see Marshall talking with the police. It is a good start to what needs to happen.

                  Without going into it too much I think the people on both sides of this issue would learn a lot if they opened their minds and actually spoke and listened to each other. They may find they have more in common then anyone is considering.
                  Last edited by Hadez; 09-17-2016, 09:12 AM.
                  Time to build on the win and grow the team from some solid play higher level of play

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by broncoslover115 View Post
                    Amazing how the articles were written up. Which goes to my post the other day about how narratives are formed.

                    I'm proud of Brandon and I hope something comes from this. Good on you Brandon.
                    I totally agree. A person can come up with different feelings based upon how each article reads. The NBC news article perpetuates the "angry Black man, who's angered at police" line as the main focal point of the story. While the DP article actually covers the spectrum of the reason behind is choices and how the two met to discuss, not just the police/community issues, but quality of life issues that plague many inner city communities as well.

                    And that's been a big issue with this whole movement. Too many reports like NBC News which promote the anger and outrage from both sides. And not enough like the Denver Post which show a non-biased view that people involved are communicating, sharing information, and finding positive ways to make the baby steps toward solutions. And is also shows that both sides know nothing will ever be perfect, but that they are willing to make moves to make things better.


                    Great move for Brandon and an equally great move by Chief White.
                    #swapping

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Everyone has their own opinion and feelings about this . Here is where the problem lies . These players are protesting the flag , national anthem . My question is why . Let's not beat around the bush on it and get down to brass taxes . Their problem is they feel oppressed. The fact is every single person is somewhat oppressed in a way . Example ; I hate being over taxed . Do I mind paying my fair share ? No of course not . The problem is these players are saying that the main focul point of this is about police brutality . I think many people truly don't understand how law enforcement dealings work . Everytime an officer uses force they have to write a report . Everytime a shooting takes place there is an in depth investigation that happens . A part of investigations include out of agency review boards . So in other words there is someone that isn't connected to the dept investigating the incident. Is there bad cops out there , yes of course there is . The percentage is very miniscule though . One simple fact remains and can't be discounted . If your involved in illegal activity your chances of dealing with peace officers are greatly increased and you will have so sort of dealing with them eventually. Are these players aware of an investigation that was done by the government that Obama put in place ? So in essence they are protesting the government by not honoring the American anthem when the government is actually on the protesters side , hence the multiple investigations into the shootings . Would your union protest your employer if you felt you were fairly paid ? No there is no sense into that . Anyone can look at data online to see crime percentages ect....
                      I think it was Clay Travis who was on air discussing this very issue . 53% of people killed by police are non black . There are 27% of blacks killed by police . It seems to me that these players are acting on feelings instead of facts . To me it's a shame that these players are doing this because I watch football because I love the sport . I don't care what the players political or religious views are . Watching sports frees the mind of the everyday hassle. I find the NFL has really screwed this up by not putting their foot down and telling these players they will stand with the team on the side lines. They are representing the NFL and if they want to protest the flag , national anthem and our great nation do it on your own time .

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        And that's where your "Brass Tax" opinion is off. Differing opinions is great and is what makes us all different. But at least have an opinion based on the facts and not an assumption of the cause.

                        They aren't protesting the flag or the national anthem. And it's not about them "feeling oppressed". It's not just about police brutality either. Though because it's a hot button issue, as it should be, it dominates and takes away from the entire cause.

                        They are protesting ALL injustice that takes place under the cover of that flag. Not just racial, but sexual and age related injustices. They have also been vocal about how this country treats its veterans when they come home and need the help of the VA. And we all know that's been a debacle for decades, yet no one cares enough to fix it. Where's the "honor" for them? We may stand at attention, but who's ringing bells for them?

                        And that's just a small part of it. You can go on and on with Americans, of all walks of life, that receive injustice under that flag, every single day. And if you feel you are "over taxed", do something about it. Rally with your fellow townsfolk, gather some facts about corrupt or excessive spending and bring it to light. If you feel that you are being wronged, do something. And if you chose not to, but sit and make under informed complaints about those who do, you become part of the problem. And that's the biggest brick wall when trying to get many of the decades old issues of this country on the road to repair.
                        #swapping

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by flosstein View Post
                          And that's where your "Brass Tax" opinion is off. Differing opinions is great and is what makes us all different. But at least have an opinion based on the facts and not an assumption of the cause.

                          They aren't protesting the flag or the national anthem. And it's not about them "feeling oppressed". It's not just about police brutality either. Though because it's a hot button issue, as it should be, it dominates and takes away from the entire cause.

                          They are protesting ALL injustice that takes place under the cover of that flag. Not just racial, but sexual and age related injustices. They have also been vocal about how this country treats its veterans when they come home and need the help of the VA. And we all know that's been a debacle for decades, yet no one cares enough to fix it. Where's the "honor" for them? We may stand at attention, but who's ringing bells for them?

                          And that's just a small part of it. You can go on and on with Americans, of all walks of life, that receive injustice under that flag, every single day. And if you feel you are "over taxed", do something about it. Rally with your fellow townsfolk, gather some facts about corrupt or excessive spending and bring it to light. If you feel that you are being wronged, do something. And if you chose not to, but sit and make under informed complaints about those who do, you become part of the problem. And that's the biggest brick wall when trying to get many of the decades old issues of this country on the road to repair.
                          The exact words out of Kaepernick mouth was "the blacks are oppressed " this whole thing is about that . He talked about shooting of unarmed black men .

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            People bleed and have died so that people in the United States can express freedom of speech.

                            As someone who has served in the military in a combat zone I understand how someone can feel that not standing for the Anthem and Flag is disrespectful to those who have sacrificed. I am old enough to remember when the Pledge of Allegiance was part of every single day at school. My eyes tear up every single time I hear the national anthem.

                            The thing is by taking away someone's freedom of speech...in any method...we are actually disrespecting those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice so we can enjoy freedom.
                            Time to build on the win and grow the team from some solid play higher level of play

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Let's be honest, if they sang the whole national anthem, the majority of the league wouldn't be standing for the it.

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