Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How Important is the Wonderlic Test?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How Important is the Wonderlic Test?

    Some of the most atheletically gifted players in the Draft, such as Jammal Brown, Carlos Rogers, Pac Man Jones, and Roscoe Parrish scored below 15 on the on the Wonderlic. So I ask, how important is the Wonderlic test?

    Would you take a player that might not have the best raw talent at his position, but scored very well on the Wonderlic???

  • #2
    DJ Williams and almost every University of Miami player coming out last year scored less than a 15. I would love to have Taylor, Williams, Vilma, Winslow, etc.... The only one I don't want is the twinkie eating Wilfork. I hear he is his own Krispe Kreme franchise.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by myoung
      DJ Williams and almost every University of Miami player coming out last year scored less than a 15. I would love to have Taylor, Williams, Vilma, Winslow, etc.... The only one I don't want is the twinkie eating Wilfork. I hear he is his own Krispe Kreme franchise.
      Actually i'm pretty sure DJ scored over 15 last year, and vilma did really well, but you're right, the rest of them are dumb as a brick.

      I like my defensive tackles like I like my women: well over 300 lbs.
      ABWRFRC

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by PRBronco
        Actually i'm pretty sure DJ scored over 15 last year, and vilma did really well, but you're right, the rest of them are dumb as a brick.
        You are right Vilma scored a 23 and Williams a 21. It was Winslow, Taylor, Wilfork, Carlos Joseph (7), that tanked it. Good catch.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by myoung
          The only one I don't want is the twinkie eating Wilfork. I hear he is his own Krispe Kreme franchise.

          Dim dar's sum fightin' wurds!

          Comment


          • #6
            To douglasj, I wasn't referring to untalented players that score high on the Wonderlic.

            My point was this, if you were a scout that was ranking players would you consider the Wonderlic if a player that is not as physically gifted, but still talented, scored a 31 on the Wonderlic and a player that is more physically gifted only scores a 8 or would you go off of pure atheletic ability alone.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by DPg2003
              To douglasj, I wasn't referring to untalented players that score high on the Wonderlic.

              My point was this, if you were a scout that was ranking players would you consider the Wonderlic if a player that is not as physically gifted, but still talented, scored a 31 on the Wonderlic and a player that is more physically gifted only scores a 8 or would you go off of pure atheletic ability alone.
              I think part of it depends on the position as well as the scheme in which the player is going to be working.

              Quarterbacks generally have a lot more responsibility and have a deeper mental aspect to their game. It tends to be unwise to have a dumb quarterback. At any position, all things being equal, I'd rather have the smarter player. It pretty much becomes a judgment call as to the tradeoff between physical talent and mental acuity.

              Other than the position, the scheme can greatly affect the intelligence requirements of the players. I remember last season many Chiefs fans were wondering why Greg Robinson's defense in Denver worked so much better than it did in Kansas City. Outside of the pure physical talent, they pretty much admitted that his schemes were too complex for what they considered intelligence-challenged players on their defense whereas Denver's teams had talented but more intelligent players who could better grasp their roles.

              Here's a snippet from Bronczilla that, while just somebody's opinion, I think holds some merit. The deriorating secondary mentioned is referring to how Robinson's defenses started to fail toward the end of his Bronco tenure:
              Gifted, intelligent players seem to thrive in Robinson’s schemes. Less gifted and less intelligent players get overwhelmed and overloaded and fail.

              So Robinson’s schemes were good, but overly complicated for Denver’s deteriorating secondary and for KC’s entire stock of defensive personnel. Robinson lacked the ability or the willingness to scale things back for these less-able players. Now Robinson is co-defensive coordinator for a college team in Texas and Gunther Cunningham – a gifted coach and a class guy – has arrived as the savior of the moment in KC.
              "You can't take the sky from me..."
              ------
              "You can't shake the Devil's hand and say you're only kidding"

              Comment


              • #8
                It obviously helps to have a high test score. On average, smarter people have smarter football minds. Still, it doesn't matter that much. Most Miami and Ohio State players can't break 20. But that's okay, because a lot of them are pretty good pro players now. When thinking about people with low Wonderlic scores that succeed, Dan Marino comes to mind. Marino scored a 16. Also, Ladanian Tomlinson scored 13. Not smart people, but they can play the game. On the other end of the spectrum, Griese scored a 39, but he totally lacks mental qualities most teams want.

                I think the lowest score this year was a 6 by Frank Gore.
                A proponent of Denver drafting Cutler since 10/05.

                So naturally, my Adopt-A-Bronco is Jay Cutler!

                Comment


                • #9
                  I think the wonderlic can also predict off the field problems. Smarter people tend to avoid getting in trouble with the law, drugs, and what not.


                  BTW, Griese kicked ass last year, he has the mental aspect the Bucs want.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Company CEO Charlie Wonderlic said the test was created in the 1930s by his grandfather, Al Wonderlic (née Wunderlich), as part of his doctoral thesis at Northwestern University. Since then, the Wonderlic has been a job-screening tool for more than 150 million applicants, from white-collar college graduates looking to join a law firm, to blue-collar workers seeking a management position in a steel mill.

                    A high score, Charlie Wonderlic said, doesn't always predict job success. But a low score usually means a prospective employee will struggle. A score of 10 or below is an indication of literacy problems."You can still be a great football player, but it means you can't be trained through reading," Wonderlic said. "What that's really telling you is just how much of a challenge it's going to be to teach this person."

                    NFL officials say it's often hard to interpret the Wonderlic numbers. There are hundreds of examples of stellar players who received mediocre scores. Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb, for example, led his team to the Super Bowl this year but reportedly scored only a 16 on his test in 1999.

                    "Do I want a smart guy instead of a dumb guy? Yes," Baltimore Ravens coach Brian Billick said. "But how do you define that? It's hard to say."

                    San Francisco 49ers vice president of player personnel Scot McCloughan said low scores tend to trigger an alarm, especially when they're made by quarterbacks and offensive linemen, who must digest huge chunks of the playbook and be able to think on the fly. Those two positions tend to score highest on the Wonderlic, averaging about 25 correct questions.

                    But high scores also can send up red flags.

                    "Some positions, like cornerback, you don't want a really intelligent guy because if he does get beat, you don't want him overanalyzing it," McCloughan said.

                    Wonderlic said that in a recent survey of 118,549 test takers, only four managed a perfect score.

                    "That means there's a one-in-30,000 chance you'll ever see a 50," he said.


                    Everybody's gotta elevate from the norm...

                    The greatest list of music I don't own on CD :sad:
                    You should check these guys out

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      In some cases I think being smart can be a disadvantage too - in that a player becomes hesitant and thinks too much instead of relying on his instincts.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        didn't david pollack score like a 31 or 33 on the wonderlic? last year i saw a scale of the all the top prospects... anyone have something like that for this year's draft class?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by madmax
                          didn't david pollack score like a 31 or 33 on the wonderlic? last year i saw a scale of the all the top prospects... anyone have something like that for this year's draft class?
                          http://www.nfldraftscout.com/ratings...astN&order=ASC
                          Teams aren't supposed to tell everyone the Wonderlic scores, but they usually leak out somehow. I can't guarantee they're accurate, but I'm going by them for now.

                          Possible selections at #25 and their Wonderlic scores:
                          DE Marcus Spears ?
                          DT Mike Patterson 9 (horrible)
                          LB Demarcus Ware 20 (average)
                          DE Justin Tuck 29 (good)
                          DE Erasmus James 17 (average)
                          DE David Pollack 30 (good)
                          DE Matt Roth 16 (kind of bad)
                          OT Jammal Brown 12 (bad)
                          CB Fabian Washington 25 (good)
                          DE Dan Cody 21 (pretty good)
                          DT Luis Castillo 37 (excellent)
                          OT Khalif Barnes 16 (kind of bad)
                          WR Mark Clayton 21 (pretty good)
                          CB Justin Miller 22 (pretty good)
                          WR Mark Clayton 21 (pretty good)

                          Notable scores:
                          QB Alex Smith 40 (second highest)
                          RB Frank Gore 6
                          C Geoff Hangartner 47 (highest)
                          QB Ryan Fitzgerald (Harvard graduate) 38
                          QB Brock Berlin 13 (lowest for a QB, probably scares teams)
                          A proponent of Denver drafting Cutler since 10/05.

                          So naturally, my Adopt-A-Bronco is Jay Cutler!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            ah, thanks psycho!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by PsychoChicken
                              http://www.nfldraftscout.com/ratings...astN&order=ASC
                              Teams aren't supposed to tell everyone the Wonderlic scores, but they usually leak out somehow. I can't guarantee they're accurate, but I'm going by them for now.

                              Possible selections at #25 and their Wonderlic scores:
                              DE Marcus Spears ?
                              DT Mike Patterson 9 (horrible)
                              LB Demarcus Ware 20 (average)
                              DE Justin Tuck 29 (good)
                              DE Erasmus James 17 (average)
                              DE David Pollack 30 (good)
                              DE Matt Roth 16 (kind of bad)
                              OT Jammal Brown 12 (bad)
                              CB Fabian Washington 25 (good)
                              DE Dan Cody 21 (pretty good)
                              DT Luis Castillo 37 (excellent)
                              OT Khalif Barnes 16 (kind of bad)
                              WR Mark Clayton 21 (pretty good)
                              CB Justin Miller 22 (pretty good)
                              WR Mark Clayton 21 (pretty good)

                              Notable scores:
                              QB Alex Smith 40 (second highest)
                              RB Frank Gore 6
                              C Geoff Hangartner 47 (highest)
                              QB Ryan Fitzgerald (Harvard graduate) 38
                              QB Brock Berlin 13 (lowest for a QB, probably scares teams)
                              Some interesting scores. That Center is one smart dude! Jammal Brown's is really low. I thought tackles had to be quite smart. Poor Frank Gore - must be the pits having the whole country know your scores! Anyway I'm sure he'll make plenty of money somewhere soon and it all won't matter at all

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X