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  • Pitt. arrival= Saturday!

    I heard on ESPN radio that the Steelers aren't going to arrive in Denver until Saturday.
    IMO, there is no way they are going to be able to adjust to the high altitude in that little of time.
    Advantage or not? I say advantage....





    .

  • #2
    Here's the link... http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06018/639764.stm

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    • #3
      When i heard it this morning, I thought I heard that wrong...what about Jet lag?

      I think the Steelers are shooting themselves on the foot for this one.


      Have a question for me? "Ask AO" A Non-Feedback Thread. You'll be glad you did!

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      • #4
        High altitude exercise can be great fun. It can also have serious effects on someone not in shape for the experience. The air is thinner (has less oxygen) at high altitudes. The heart must work harder by beating faster to meet the body's oxygen needs. Sudden changes in altitude and workload can be life threatening.

        Distress symptoms during exercise include shortness of breath, rapid breathing, faster heart rate, poor athletic performance, and early fatigue. Take care. Slow your pace if climbing or hiking up to higher ground. Avoid hard workouts for a few days upon arrival at a higher altitude.

        Other problems may develop when not exercising. These are headache, agitation, nausea and vomiting, a general ill feeling, loss of appetite, and an inability to sleep. The body needs time to adjust to a high altitude. It does so by making more red blood cells to carry more oxygen. It takes about 8 days for the body to fully adjust to high altitude. Return to a lower altitude if the symptoms do not go away.

        Rare but serious problems may occur when progressing too fast from your normal altitude to a higher one. Watch for extreme shortness of breath, rapid breathing and pulse, and weakness. Chest pain, severe headache, and confusion may require immediate medical care.

        Fit people are less likely to feel the effects of higher altitudes. Train lightly when first relocating to higher altitudes. Allow your body several days to adapt to the new altitude. Take time to rest. Drink plenty of fluids. Return to a lower altitude if symptoms occur and do not improve. Medical care may be needed at this time.

        Be prepared whether you are hiking, climbing, or biking in the mountains. Get in shape for the event first. Do not overdo it once you are there. Listen to your body and use common sense.


        http://www.baptistonline.org/health/...y/spor5116.asp
        Official 2009 Adopt-A-Bronco:Moreno, Knowshon

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        • #5
          They were talking about that on Mike and Mike in the morning this morning.

          Cowher has decided that they can't come in early enough to get used to the altitude, so instead they are going to go in late so that they are less likely to be effected by it. The theory is that just being in the thin air effects you for the first couple days, and the shorter the exposure, the fewer the effects, or something like that.

          The good thing is that means its already in their heads... lol, I made a funny! The Steelers have AIR in their heads!!!
          The human body has two ends on it: one to create with and one to sit on. Sometimes people get their ends reversed. When this happens they need a kick in the seat of the pants. --- Theodore Roosevelt

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          • #6
            Originally posted by **OrangeTerp**
            I heard on ESPN radio that the Steelers aren't going to arrive in Denver until Saturday.
            IMO, there is no way they are going to be able to adjust to the high altitude in that little of time.
            Advantage or not? I say advantage....





            .

            Actually according to UPMC Medical Center you have two choices that are best.

            #1 arrive early in the week aka Tuesday at latest
            #2 arrive as late as possible

            Those are straight from the doctors mouth the best way to fight the altitude.

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            • #7
              Yeah, The Bus is at a real disadvantage there too, being Asthmatic and all. I imagine watching most of the steelers siucking those masks all day long.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Hampton_eatsQB
                Actually according to UPMC Medical Center you have two choices that are best.

                #1 arrive early in the week aka Tuesday at latest
                #2 arrive as late as possible

                Those are straight from the doctors mouth the best way to fight the altitude.
                But that will not combat jet lag.
                John 11: 25-27

                My Adopt-A-Bronco is D.J. Williams



                Thanks Snk16

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                • #9
                  Guy on ESPN with Mark Schelerth, who used to play DB (dont know his name)

                  He said he played in Denver 3 times...and each time he went onto the field, he could feel his lungs burning. He said it took a quarter to quarter and a half to accalamte to the thinner air.

                  Seems like a good idea to come out fast and score, while their lungs are burning...get them tired early...
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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by BroncFanIN
                    Guy on ESPN with Mark Schelerth, who used to play DB (dont know his name)

                    He said he played in Denver 3 times...and each time he went onto the field, he could feel his lungs burning. He said it took a quarter to quarter and a half to accalamte to the thinner air.

                    Seems like a good idea to come out fast and score, while their lungs are burning...get them tired early...
                    Darren Woodson.
                    The human body has two ends on it: one to create with and one to sit on. Sometimes people get their ends reversed. When this happens they need a kick in the seat of the pants. --- Theodore Roosevelt

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by TXBRONC
                      But that will not combat jet lag.
                      dude... you don't get jet lag from going 2 time zones... i flew coast to coast and didn't get jet lag. and anyways... most of the time people have more problems going east not west becuase they are losing hours going east rather than gaining hours going west... but obviously you have never traveled a long distance in the air cuz you don't get jet lag from 2 time zones... so that is a non factor...

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                      • #12
                        throw some deep bombs early.... to make them DBs run.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by BroncoABQ
                          High altitude exercise can be great fun. It can also have serious effects on someone not in shape for the experience. The air is thinner (has less oxygen) at high altitudes.
                          http://www.baptistonline.org/health/...y/spor5116.asp
                          While I can certainly appreciate the rest of what was posted, I have to jump in here and say that there is just as much oxygen in the air at 20,000 ft above sea level as there is at sea level. Approximately 21% of the atmosphere is O2, no matter how high you go. If you want to talk about atmospheric pressure, and the partial-pressure of O2, and the oxygen dissociation curve, I'm all for it. I know it's a small point, but it's the lower air pressure at higher altitudes that makes the air, and most importantly, the oxygen in the air, have less ability to cross into the red blood cells. At sea level, with the entire atmosphere pushing the air into the RBCs oxygen does indeed diffuse into your blood more easily. Common compensatory mechanisms of the body are both slowly and quickly adjusted. The first and fastest were mentioned in the previous paragraphs, such as more rapid breathing, etc. Slower effects are the increase in RBC count as a percentage of whole blood (hematocrit) and an increase in a molecule called 2,3DPG which helps hemoglobin to release O2 more easily, thus making more O2 available to cells for metabolic processes. Like I said, it's a fine point, but there's just as much O2 here in Denver as there is on top of Mount Everest, as there is in Pittsburgh. It just doesn't enter the red cells as easily at higher altitudes.

                          Go Broncos!!!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by AsianOrange
                            When i heard it this morning, I thought I heard that wrong...what about Jet lag?

                            I think the Steelers are shooting themselves on the foot for this one.
                            Umm... you don't get jet lag from travelling 2 time zones. More like 4 or 5 before it becomes a problem. 8-10 get's crazy. If anything, it will help them get to bed earlier than normal.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Lachlan
                              While I can certainly appreciate the rest of what was posted, I have to jump in here and say that there is just as much oxygen in the air at 20,000 ft above sea level as there is at sea level. Approximately 21% of the atmosphere is O2, no matter how high you go. If you want to talk about atmospheric pressure, and the partial-pressure of O2, and the oxygen dissociation curve, I'm all for it. I know it's a small point, but it's the lower air pressure at higher altitudes that makes the air, and most importantly, the oxygen in the air, have less ability to cross into the red blood cells. At sea level, with the entire atmosphere pushing the air into the RBCs oxygen does indeed diffuse into your blood more easily. Common compensatory mechanisms of the body are both slowly and quickly adjusted. The first and fastest were mentioned in the previous paragraphs, such as more rapid breathing, etc. Slower effects are the increase in RBC count as a percentage of whole blood (hematocrit) and an increase in a molecule called 2,3DPG which helps hemoglobin to release O2 more easily, thus making more O2 available to cells for metabolic processes. Like I said, it's a fine point, but there's just as much O2 here in Denver as there is on top of Mount Everest, as there is in Pittsburgh. It just doesn't enter the red cells as easily at higher altitudes.

                              Go Broncos!!!

                              Thank you Mr. Professor! Now, here's a coconut, a seashell and a palm leaf. Get started on that nuclear reactor right away!!

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