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Players we traded up or down for in the draft?

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  • Players we traded up or down for in the draft?

    I'm trying to come up with a list of players we traded up or down for in the draft.

    Jarvis Moss up

    Marcus Thomas up

    Tebow up and down?

    Julius Thomas up

    Ronnie Hillman up?

    Wasn't DT up and down?

    Paxton Lynch up

  • #2
    Derek Wolfe down

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    • #3
      Originally posted by lvbronx View Post
      I'm trying to come up with a list of players we traded up or down for in the draft.

      Jarvis Moss up

      Marcus Thomas up

      Tebow up and down?

      Julius Thomas up

      Ronnie Hillman up?

      Wasn't DT up and down?

      Paxton Lynch up
      Jarvis Moss what a huge huge disappointment, Julius Thomas was a late pick and a good one. Ronnie Hillman not a great move, Tebow, well we know that ending. Paxton Lynch way way too early to tell but I bet Cleavland, Jacksonsville, and the Jets wish they had him to try out. DT was a good pick. We also moved up to a DB not on this list that I can't remember but he was a major disappointment as well. The Draft is always a crap-shoot, Tom Brady should have never gone in the 6th and Rod Smith should have never been undrafted.

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      • #4
        Janovich we traded down for

        Latimer we traded up for

        In sure there are more but those two popped up in my head that weren't on your list

        Edit* also traded up for Shane ray and can't remember if roby was at our pick or if we trade up.




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        • #5
          We traded a pick to get perrish Cox

          So not up but i think it was a first rounder the next year for a second this year ( at the time) to get him.


          If i recall that turned into earl Thomas for the Seahawks the next year
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          • #6
            Originally posted by EddieMac View Post
            We traded a pick to get perrish Cox

            So not up but i think it was a first rounder the next year for a second this year ( at the time) to get him.


            If i recall that turned into earl Thomas for the Seahawks the next year
            Alphonso Smith, CB, 2nd, 37th, 2009 is who you mean I think

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            • #7
              Originally posted by WYBRONCO View Post
              Alphonso Smith, CB, 2nd, 37th, 2009 is who you mean I think
              YES , thank you .. Cox didn't seem right but its all I could come up with.

              Smith was essentially the No. 14 pick of this draft. On draft night in 2009, Denver fell in love with the small but decorated Smith as he fell out of the first round. Denver apparently stopped the Wake Forest product’s fall at No. 37 when it sent its 2010 first-round pick (which turned out to be No. 14) to Seattle to take Smith. The Seahawks ended up taking safety Earl Thomas with the pick. He was considered a value pick, but the idea of giving up a future No. 1 pick seemed extreme.


              Thank you Josh McDaniels.
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              • #8
                Originally posted by EddieMac View Post
                YES , thank you .. Cox didn't seem right but its all I could come up with.

                Smith was essentially the No. 14 pick of this draft. On draft night in 2009, Denver fell in love with the small but decorated Smith as he fell out of the first round. Denver apparently stopped the Wake Forest product’s fall at No. 37 when it sent its 2010 first-round pick (which turned out to be No. 14) to Seattle to take Smith. The Seahawks ended up taking safety Earl Thomas with the pick. He was considered a value pick, but the idea of giving up a future No. 1 pick seemed extreme.


                Thank you Josh McDaniels.
                That's draft was terrible in general for a lot of teams, especially Denver. We took Moreno, Ayers, Smith, Bruton, Olsen, Brandstater, and Schlueter. Hind sight is obviously 20/20, but if we could have taken Orakpo, Mack, Byrd, and McCoy with the 1st 4 picks we would be golden.
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by FlowdaBroncoFan View Post
                  That's draft was terrible in general for a lot of teams, especially Denver. We took Moreno, Ayers, Smith, Bruton, Olsen, Brandstater, and Schlueter. Hind sight is obviously 20/20, but if we could have taken Orakpo, Mack, Byrd, and McCoy with the 1st 4 picks we would be golden.
                  Well Byrd sucks so...

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                  • #10
                    Denver traded up for Jay Cutler. I remember I was in the hospital after having my appendix out, the doctor came in to see me so I took the earpiece for the TV out, after he left I was trying to figure out what happened and how Denver had Cutler, the QB I didn't want them to take.

                    Also notable in this is that Denver was worried about anyone putting together that they were interested in Cutler, so they never once talked to him and instead had Jeff Fisher and the Titans do it for them and then pass along the info.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by aditheman View Post
                      Well Byrd sucks so...
                      Well almost everyone sucked from that draft. He is the best player who was taken right after us in the 2nd.
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                      • #12
                        My point for asking this was to make a case that it's far better to trade down than up, and trading up should rarely be done, if ever.

                        I don't see where the players we traded up for are any better than the ones we traded down and got. The difference is, when we trade up we lose draft picks. When we trade down we get more draft picks.

                        My main strategy for the draft is generally to trade down in the first round and get extra draft picks. For example, if we trade down from #22 to #28, we'll pick up an extra draft pick or two and still get a player as good as if we stayed at #22.

                        Then use one of the extra picks to trade for a vet. Teams tend to over-value picks during the draft and some solid players can be had for a 3rd-5th. If done right, a #22 can get an equal player a little later in the draft, an additional draft pick, as well as a decent vet.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lvbronx View Post
                          My point for asking this was to make a case that it's far better to trade down than up, and trading up should rarely be done, if ever.

                          I don't see where the players we traded up for are any better than the ones we traded down and got. The difference is, when we trade up we lose draft picks. When we trade down we get more draft picks.

                          My main strategy for the draft is generally to trade down in the first round and get extra draft picks. For example, if we trade down from #22 to #28, we'll pick up an extra draft pick or two and still get a player as good as if we stayed at #22.

                          Then use one of the extra picks to trade for a vet. Teams tend to over-value picks during the draft and some solid players can be had for a 3rd-5th. If done right, a #22 can get an equal player a little later in the draft, an additional draft pick, as well as a decent vet.

                          It really just depends on the situation. Obviously there are extreme examples where trading up has severely damaged a franchise for many years, the Saints with Ricky Williams, the Chargers with Ryan Leaf(They traded up from pick 3 to pick 2 to get Leaf in 98), Washington with RG3 for example, and many examples where it simply doesn't work out for the team trading up although the negative impact may not be as severe.

                          So when I say it depends on the situation, it comes down to how much ammunition you have left in the draft to fill roster spots, and how good the player you trade up for ends up being.

                          Some historical examples to think about.

                          Darrelle Revis. The Jets traded up to get him in the first round, their 1st 2nd and 5th rounders.
                          Eric Weddle. SD traded with the Bears and gave up 4 picks to get Weddle in the 2nd round.
                          Julio Jones. Atlanta gave up 5 picks to get Jones at 6 in 2011.
                          TY Hilton. Indy traded up to get Hilton in the 3rd round of 2012.
                          Haloti Ngata. Baltimore Traded up with Cleveland to get Ngata in 2006. It was just moving from 13 to 12, but Cleveland missed out on Ngata and ended up with Kameron Wimbley.



                          Obviously the Patriots are the model for taking picks, wheeling and dealing, moving down and getting extra picks, but they've traded up to get players before. They moved up to get Chandler Jones, Donta Hightower. They also traded up to get Gronk in the 2nd round of 2010.

                          But the Browns have also pursued this strategy in recent years and they've been what many consider to be on the wrong end of a lot of trades where they give up the chance to take an elite prospect like Julio Jones, Sammy Watkins, and last year Wentz, and use the picks they acquire and are unable to get impact players.


                          And I'll just throw in my last example of trading up,
                          The 49ers traded up in round 1 of '85 to select Jerry Rice.

                          The main point I'm trying to get across is that trading down isn't inherently better than trading up. Nor is trading up inherently better than trading down. It depends on the player the team is targeting (if he truly is a special player), whether there's a good backup pick if the player doesn't reach their pick, if the price to trade up isn't crippling to a team's ability to build a roster. A lot of factors go into a team's decision to trade up and while most fans look at say a move from #22 down to #28 while picking up a 3rd and maybe a 5th to be always a good decision, it would depend on the crop of players they are potentially losing out to and if the players available at #28 still include some impact players.
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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by CTM View Post
                            It really just depends on the situation. Obviously there are extreme examples where trading up has severely damaged a franchise for many years, the Saints with Ricky Williams, the Chargers with Ryan Leaf(They traded up from pick 3 to pick 2 to get Leaf in 98), Washington with RG3 for example, and many examples where it simply doesn't work out for the team trading up although the negative impact may not be as severe.

                            So when I say it depends on the situation, it comes down to how much ammunition you have left in the draft to fill roster spots, and how good the player you trade up for ends up being.

                            Some historical examples to think about.

                            Darrelle Revis. The Jets traded up to get him in the first round, their 1st 2nd and 5th rounders.
                            Eric Weddle. SD traded with the Bears and gave up 4 picks to get Weddle in the 2nd round.
                            Julio Jones. Atlanta gave up 5 picks to get Jones at 6 in 2011.
                            TY Hilton. Indy traded up to get Hilton in the 3rd round of 2012.
                            Haloti Ngata. Baltimore Traded up with Cleveland to get Ngata in 2006. It was just moving from 13 to 12, but Cleveland missed out on Ngata and ended up with Kameron Wimbley.



                            Obviously the Patriots are the model for taking picks, wheeling and dealing, moving down and getting extra picks, but they've traded up to get players before. They moved up to get Chandler Jones, Donta Hightower. They also traded up to get Gronk in the 2nd round of 2010.

                            But the Browns have also pursued this strategy in recent years and they've been what many consider to be on the wrong end of a lot of trades where they give up the chance to take an elite prospect like Julio Jones, Sammy Watkins, and last year Wentz, and use the picks they acquire and are unable to get impact players.


                            And I'll just throw in my last example of trading up,
                            The 49ers traded up in round 1 of '85 to select Jerry Rice.

                            The main point I'm trying to get across is that trading down isn't inherently better than trading up. Nor is trading up inherently better than trading down. It depends on the player the team is targeting (if he truly is a special player), whether there's a good backup pick if the player doesn't reach their pick, if the price to trade up isn't crippling to a team's ability to build a roster. A lot of factors go into a team's decision to trade up and while most fans look at say a move from #22 down to #28 while picking up a 3rd and maybe a 5th to be always a good decision, it would depend on the crop of players they are potentially losing out to and if the players available at #28 still include some impact players.
                            Yes, you came up with a few examples, just as a few examples were posted above how trading up worked out for us. However, we need to examine EVERY trade not just a couple. And our results show the players we were "targeting" by trading up haven't turned out to be any better than the players we traded down to get, as well as collected more picks by doing so.

                            When considering these trades, we should also factor in potential players lost by trading up and the players we've gained by trading down.

                            My point is that drafting players isn't an exact science and there's little difference between the players available 6 picks apart. And there's very little difference between players drafted 76 and 96. Teams tend to fall in love with players in the draft, but they're not perfect and having extra picks means more chances of finding good players.

                            I forget the numbers, but it's something like less than 50% of first round picks become long term starters for the team that drafted them. Teams and fans highly over-rate draft picks.

                            Bellichick trades down to collect more draft picks and I'd bet that teams with the most picks year in and year out are the teams the do the best finding players. If a team gets two extra picks every year, that's 20 extra over a 10 year period. I like the chances of finding an extra good player or two with those extra picks.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by lvbronx View Post
                              My point for asking this was to make a case that it's far better to trade down than up, and trading up should rarely be done, if ever.

                              I don't see where the players we traded up for are any better than the ones we traded down and got. The difference is, when we trade up we lose draft picks. When we trade down we get more draft picks.

                              My main strategy for the draft is generally to trade down in the first round and get extra draft picks. For example, if we trade down from #22 to #28, we'll pick up an extra draft pick or two and still get a player as good as if we stayed at #22.

                              Then use one of the extra picks to trade for a vet. Teams tend to over-value picks during the draft and some solid players can be had for a 3rd-5th. If done right, a #22 can get an equal player a little later in the draft, an additional draft pick, as well as a decent vet.
                              Not every case is the same though, if you're a young rebuilding team or an older team in need of an infusion of youth, than yes trade down, stockpile picks and get as much youth as you can. If you're already a younger team and you're getting pretty good and will have limited spots available on your roster for rookies to make it, it seems like trading up for quality over quantity is the better option.

                              Just because trading down worked better than trading up in a previous draft doesn't mean it will work out better for you, or is the correct option in future drafts, every year is different.

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