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Greatest QB of all time Elway or Manning?

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  • #16
    Peyton Manning in my opinion. I was not old enough to have watched John Elways entire career, so my opinion is probably a little incomplete. But, I feel like legacy and impact on the sport as a whole, it isn't even debatable who changed the game through their style of play the most, it was Peyton.

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    • #17
      Peyton Manning
      Games benched for cheating.... Tom Brady = 4 Peyton Manning = 0
      Accept it or seek therapy !
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      • #18
        Right on guys! This is what I was looking for. Keep the debate going!

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        • #19
          John Elway vs Eli Manning is probably a better comparison.
          Peyton Manning and Tom Brady are really just on a different level than these older greats.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by SMR81 View Post
            Hmmm, before the ball was snapped, so who got the ball to the players?

            Manning played in almost 40 more games than Elway has, yet has lost few games than Elway.

            Elway’s ceiling for passing TDs was Manning’s floor!

            Sure Elway was a better athlete, no argument, he could scramble and huck the ball down field. But as far as who played the QB position better, who could operate the team better, who could put points on the board, which is really the goal, Peyton was the superior QB hands down.
            The biggest part of Mannings game was before the ball was even snapped. He was a cerebral player. Super smart and knew what the other team was doing before the ball was snapped.

            I won't take anything away from Manning. Again the game is different. I would love to see Elway play in today's game. Manning's numbers are so inflated due to the fact that the game has changed the rules so much to protect the passer and to allow easier targets due to rule changes.
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            • #21
              Originally posted by SMR81 View Post
              John Elway vs Eli Manning is probably a better comparison.
              Peyton Manning and Tom Brady are really just on a different level than these older greats.
              Different game - Different era.

              To put Elway with Eli is complete disrespect and laughable.
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              • #22
                Originally posted by SMR81 View Post
                John Elway vs Eli Manning is probably a better comparison.
                Peyton Manning and Tom Brady are really just on a different level than these older greats.
                Not to knock you at all on your opinion SMR81 but how old are you? Now, don't lie!! LOL
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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Stackhouser View Post
                  The biggest part of Mannings game was before the ball was even snapped. He was a cerebral player. Super smart and knew what the other team was doing before the ball was snapped.

                  I won't take anything away from Manning. Again the game is different. I would love to see Elway play in today's game. Manning's numbers are so inflated due to the fact that the game has changed the rules so much to protect the passer and to allow easier targets due to rule changes.
                  Regardless, he still had to make plays with the ball, those 55 TDS didn’t throw themselves. The fact that he got defenses to bend and show their hand to his voice shouldn’t take anything away from his abilities, that’s what puts Peyton on a whole different level that Elway.

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                  • #24
                    Manning has great abilities, just not on par with Elway....

                    Rule changes also helped put Peyton on your so-called "different level"....
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                    • #25
                      Elway was the definition of winner, a leader of men on the field by example. No intentional slight to Elway’s teammates in the 1980s, but without the Duke behind center, there’s no way Denver even sniffs three Super Bowl appearances during the decade.

                      Notably, Elway had few receivers who stood taller than 6-feet until Rod Smith and Ed McCaffrey in the mid-90s. Steven Watson was that tall target, Vance Johnson and Mark Jackson were shorter; these were the men Elway had to throw to in the 1980s. The Duke also had very few play-making running backs until Terrell Davis exploded onto the scene. Of course, Elway may have been the best runner in Denver from 1984-1995, his rookie year until Davis’ rookie campaign; and that’s what really sets him apart from Manning.

                      Underestimated is Elway’s athletic ability; he was among the greatest dual-threat quarterbacks of his day and arguably helped set the stage for players like Cam Newton. Though, if there were a modern day quarterback which compared to the Duke, it’d be Andrew Luck, who has decent wheels of his own and also a cannon for an arm.
                      The “Elway cross?” That impression was made when he put all his power behind a throw and the tip of the ball hit a receiver in an unpadded area, the seams pressing into skin to form a red “cross.” He was so athletic, Elway played outfield and pitcher for the New York Yankees before deciding to stick with football.

                      Elway took the Broncos on his back and carried them to victories. Elway did everything in his power to win every, single week. It’s why he retired as the NFL’s comeback king; Elway had to will his team to victory, to snatch victory from the jaws of defeat time and time again. When his receivers couldn’t get open, No. 7 would drop back, tuck the ball and then take off for first downs, getting muddy and bloody, bruised and beaten all along the way.
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                      • #26
                        Best all-time pure passer was Dan Marino.
                        "Mike Harden, meet Steve Largent." KA-BOOM!!

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Stackhouser View Post
                          Different game - Different era.

                          To put Elway with Eli is complete disrespect and laughable.
                          How so?
                          Eli was a very good football player in his prime. 2 super bowl rings, came up clutch in some big games, and was a big part of his super bowl wins. Elway is one of the greats, but again very much overrated.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Stackhouser View Post
                            Manning has great abilities, just not on par with Elway....

                            Rule changes also helped put Peyton on your so-called "different level"....
                            Elway would ride the bench if on the same team as Peyton, throwing bombs down field isn’t enough.

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                            • #29
                              http://https://athlonsports.com/nfl/john-elway-not-tom-brady-is-greatest-nfl-qb-all-time

                              This article is good... ya it says Brady in the title... but focus on the Elway manning stuff..and misses Manning’s last SB..but 8ts still good.
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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by EddieMac View Post
                                Elway was the definition of winner, a leader of men on the field by example. No intentional slight to Elway’s teammates in the 1980s, but without the Duke behind center, there’s no way Denver even sniffs three Super Bowl appearances during the decade.

                                Notably, Elway had few receivers who stood taller than 6-feet until Rod Smith and Ed McCaffrey in the mid-90s. Steven Watson was that tall target, Vance Johnson and Mark Jackson were shorter; these were the men Elway had to throw to in the 1980s. The Duke also had very few play-making running backs until Terrell Davis exploded onto the scene. Of course, Elway may have been the best runner in Denver from 1984-1995, his rookie year until Davis’ rookie campaign; and that’s what really sets him apart from Manning.

                                Underestimated is Elway’s athletic ability; he was among the greatest dual-threat quarterbacks of his day and arguably helped set the stage for players like Cam Newton. Though, if there were a modern day quarterback which compared to the Duke, it’d be Andrew Luck, who has decent wheels of his own and also a cannon for an arm.
                                The “Elway cross?” That impression was made when he put all his power behind a throw and the tip of the ball hit a receiver in an unpadded area, the seams pressing into skin to form a red “cross.” He was so athletic, Elway played outfield and pitcher for the New York Yankees before deciding to stick with football.

                                Elway took the Broncos on his back and carried them to victories. Elway did everything in his power to win every, single week. It’s why he retired as the NFL’s comeback king; Elway had to will his team to victory, to snatch victory from the jaws of defeat time and time again. When his receivers couldn’t get open, No. 7 would drop back, tuck the ball and then take off for first downs, getting muddy and bloody, bruised and beaten all along the way.
                                The definition of winner until you look at players like Brady or Manning.
                                Peyton Manning played in almost 40 more games than Elway, yet Elway still lost more games than Manning.
                                So sure Elway is great, but Manning is another level of greatness. He was a QB, OC and DC all in one. If he didn’t like the defense he saw, more often than not he’d either come up with a play that worked, or get the opposing defense to switch out.

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