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HS Quarterback help, please.

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  • HS Quarterback help, please.

    A quick background about myself before we begin:

    I'm currently 13 years, 1 month, and 27 days old. I'm currently in my 2nd month in 8th Grade. I'm a footballholic, I'm seriously obsessed with the sport.

    I go to a relatively small school (a few hundred students). We have a thriving HS football program, and even a 7th-8th grade football league. I played QB during my 8th grade year, and we went 4-4 (Maybe 4-5, I can't remember all that well anymore.) Currently, we have a 3 man race for the starting QB position.

    (All measurements approximate for one year from now)

    Me - 5' 9", 140 LBs, logical, football smart, accurate. (average arm strength). Freshman next year.

    Comp #1 - 5' 9" 130 LBs, cocky, good arm, average accuracy (less experience, not particularly good fundamentals) Freshman next year.

    Comp #2 - 5' 8" 150 LBs, good arm, experience (shorter, chubbier) Sophomore next year. Backup QB this year. Age 15 next year.

    As you can see, we're all pretty similar. I've been lifting weights and running ever since football finished up, trying to get better for next year. I'm almost 6 months younger than comp #2, and more than 3 months younger than #1. I grew 4 inches this past year, and I'm hoping for another 3-4.

    What I need from you guys is advice. Anything helpful when it comes to Quarterbacking, holding for the kicker, or even good diet and workout regimens. I want all the ammo I can get for next year, and I think this is a good place to ask.

    Please help, and thanks in advance,

    ~ Peter (AKA Cutlery)
    You know what? The Browns can win the AFC North this year.




    I'm a guy, but I lurve Jay Cutler.


  • #2
    Learn your plays in and out.
    Work on your footwork.

    As for passing, work on your short game. Throw alot of short 7 and out passes. Throw many slant passes. Throw many short seam passes.

    Make everything you do as QB a routine. (Handing the ball off, dropping back and thowing passes.) Become comfortable doing those things. Have fun while you are working on these things in the offseason. Don't stress out so much about what the other guys are doing or how big they may get. Just work on yourself and improve the things you can do with yourself. HAVE FUN. HAVE FUN. TAKE SOME TIME OFF, THEN GET Right BACK at IT!

    Best wishes on your offseason workouts.
    Emancipate your mind!
    The People's Poster

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    • #3
      You didn't give us enough info about yourself sir.
      What color is your hair? And what color are your eyes?

      just playin.
      I wasn't a QB in Hs though.
      I could play it if needed but one thing to do is to always work out and weight lift like you are doing. The more you work out and show you are dedicated to being the starter the better chance you have. Coaches like to see work ethic from kids whether your the best at your posistion or not.

      But keep practicing at your weaknesses.

      Good luck and let us know how you do.

      Comment


      • #4
        As stated above, at your level, footwork, fundamentals of throwing and making every possible throw feel routine. Physical memory is a real thing.

        Study as much as you can to make reads quickly. HS Football offenses are getting more sophisticated, but are still definitely way less complex than pro or most college offenses. So, the quicker you can recongize the mismatch on a defense, the better a QB you are. Arm strength will come as you mature, but physical skills with no mental abilities or basic fundamentals won't do you a whole lot of good.


        And focusing on little things like holding for the kicker and practicing snap exchanges will not only improve your skills, but likely give you a small edge over a less prepared competitor.

        Everybody's gotta elevate from the norm...

        The greatest list of music I don't own on CD :sad:
        You should check these guys out

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        • #5
          First of all, you might be the most well read 13 year old I've ever met

          One more thing to add on what the fellas above said:


          If your deadset about being a quaterback, practice your vision. I played safety in high school and I cant emphasise enough how important the reads you make will be in the latter stages of your young career. Just knowing when to look off a reciever or guide him with your eyes can offset a weak or even inaccuate arm (Naturally, at 13 the arm strength factor is impossible to judge) and it can give you a tremendous advantage against high school secondaries.

          My high school coach always told me that 99% of the secondary was following a QB's eyes and let the instincts do the rest.
          Rest in Peace, Darrent and Damien. You will be forever in our thoughts

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          • #6
            I would only reiterate what the above guys have said. Work on every thing, don't compare to yourself to the others - just compare yourself to yourself a day before, a week before, a month before, etc. Constantly keep trying to improve.
            My coach said that it is like watering bamboo. First few years you get little or no results. But after that, with good care, bamboo grows at an amazing rate. Just put in the work and it'll pay off. Another thing he said is to "make deposits." Work hard and get tired in practice. Put in all the blood sweat and tears in practice. Get everything right. When it comes to game time, every thing will be second nature. You can draw on your deposits in practice in game. Draw on the great plays you had in practice.
            A good QB is nothing without a good OL though. Colt Brennan bought his whole OL dinner at a fancy restaurant. Get to know your OL well, and know their strengths and weaknesses. Know who you can rely on.

            I play DB, and a DB always watches the QB, unless it's man coverage. Try to implement motions. Get your slot and wide out to switch spots when you see a safety coming up to man coverage. That'll exploit the mismatch between a speedy wide out and slower safety.

            And remember - a corner, however good he is, including Champ Bailey, can NEVER cover a good receiver for more than 5 seconds. If your line gives you enough time and the (speedy) receiver runs a good fade, then you can long bomb it to him (the corner will most likely be chasing the receiver downfield). Oh yea - work on your arm strength.
            Last edited by NickTranOwnz; 11-09-2007, 10:32 PM.

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            • #7
              I've never played QB, but I played corner. Like mentioned earlier, learn to look off a defender. It makes guys second guess themselves later in the game.

              Another thing that I'm surprised hasn't been mentioned, is PRACTICE AT GAME SPEED. This is an absolutely nessesary detail when position battles are ongoing.

              Coaches want to see who's gonna give 100% day in and day out.
              I can't emphasize this enough. It also will help you establish a tempo for the rest of the defense (or offense in your case), forcing the team to follow you, essentially making you a leader. Worked for me.

              Slow practices make for slow game speed. Ask lots of questions. At your age, most teams only throw about 35% of the time. So also like mentioned earlier, make sure your hand-off exchange is sound. Also, after the exchange, get up field and block (most coaches love that)

              HAVE FUN!!!



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              • #8
                Originally posted by cadencesdad View Post
                I've never played QB, but I played corner. Like mentioned earlier, learn to look off a defender. It makes guys second guess themselves later in the game.

                Another thing that I'm surprised hasn't been mentioned, is PRACTICE AT GAME SPEED. This is an absolutely nessesary detail when position battles are ongoing.

                Coaches want to see who's gonna give 100% day in and day out.
                I can't emphasize this enough. It also will help you establish a tempo for the rest of the defense (or offense in your case), forcing the team to follow you, essentially making you a leader. Worked for me.

                Slow practices make for slow game speed. Ask lots of questions. At your age, most teams only throw about 35% of the time. So also like mentioned earlier, make sure your hand-off exchange is sound. Also, after the exchange, get up field and block (most coaches love that)

                HAVE FUN!!!
                Oh yeah, that too. Practice at game speed in practice. Get everything right, everything perfect, get everything to BECOME SECOND NATURE. Then in the games, it feels like everything will be in slow motion, like you've been there, you know what's going to happen, and you can execute it perfectly.

                As a DB my coach would say that, and give us the example of a ball coming towards us in the game. He said to get everything to be slow motion in game by going game speed in practice and getting it all right. Everything should be second nature in the game. He said that you should be able to look around at everything, and see the ball coming like it's in slow motion. Then you can seize the chance and pick it off.

                But ya basically go game speed and try to get the basics to be second nature.

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