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Army-Lion won't be able to play in NFL

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  • Army-Lion won't be able to play in NFL

    I know this isn't Bronco football, but I found this kinda odd.

    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/200....ap/index.html

    DETROIT (AP) -- Caleb Campbell will not get a chance to play for the Detroit Lions because of a change in military policy.

    Campbell was a seventh-round draft pick for the Lions in April. At the time, Army policy would have allowed the West Point graduate to serve as a recruiter if he made the team.

    But a subsequent Department of Defense policy has superseded the 2005 Army policy.

    In a letter to Lions president Matt Millen dated Wednesday, U.S. Army Lt. Col. Jonathan P. Liba wrote that Campbell has been ordered to give up professional football for "full-time traditional military duties."

    Liba wrote that 2nd Lt. Campbell may ask to be released from his active duty obligations in May 2010.

    Liba said Campbell was allowed to enter the draft "in good faith."



    Apparently there was a change of policy? Anyone know when the policy change was?
    Bronco fan from Packer Land.
    Lefty Writer on The Sports Show with Woody Paige and Les Shapiro
    Tweet me @JoRo_5551

  • #2
    http://forums.denverbroncos.com/showthread.php?t=118166


    =/

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    • #3
      This right here is really messed up. Tell him that he can go to the NFL, then yank it out from underneath him ONE WEEK FROM TRAINING CAMP. how was he not grandfathered in???
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      • #4
        Yeah that kinda sucks...I understand when you sign up you have a duty and obligation to your country. However if they were not going to let him play in the NFL they should have never got his hopes up and actually let him get drafted by an NFL team. Talk about a slap in the face, I would rather have them tell me no you can enter the draft, serve my time and try to get into the NFL afterwards.

        I feel bad for the kid...I wonder if they will reverse their decision if this story gets a lot of bad press? It's not like he was not going to serve his country, he just would have done it as a recruiter.

        Thx,
        Joe
        To live is to suffer, to survive is to find meaning in the suffering.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by garzjoe View Post
          Yeah that kinda sucks...I understand when you sign up you have a duty and obligation to your country. However if they were not going to let him play in the NFL they should have never got his hopes up and actually let him get drafted by an NFL team. Talk about a slap in the face, I would rather have them tell me no you can enter the draft, serve my time and try to get into the NFL afterwards.

          I feel bad for the kid...I wonder if they will reverse their decision if this story gets a lot of bad press? It's not like he was not going to serve his country, he just would have done it as a recruiter.

          Thx,
          Joe
          More than likely, this will be a MAJOR PR Problem for the Army.
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          • #6
            Ya I never liked this rule.... since i am close to the Air force base there was this guy named chad hall.... he was a really good running back last year.... and did he get a chance too play pro.... no..... so if i could change .... it would go like this.... if the player has a good chance going pro.... let him play football and leave it up too him on what he wants too do if he is from the air force, navy or army

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            • #7
              Originally posted by The Hamburgler View Post
              More than likely, this will be a MAJOR PR Problem for the Army.
              I donno, it was a smaller header on SI....

              I almost was wondering if they kinda hush hushed it so it still had the good feelingness when they got major pub after he was allowed to try? And then some people later would say "whatever happened too..." but the general consensus would still have the good feeling?


              I tend to see the worst in people though... don't want that to come off as bashing
              Bronco fan from Packer Land.
              Lefty Writer on The Sports Show with Woody Paige and Les Shapiro
              Tweet me @JoRo_5551

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              • #8
                Originally posted by JoRo View Post
                I donno, it was a smaller header on SI....

                I almost was wondering if they kinda hush hushed it so it still had the good feelingness when they got major pub after he was allowed to try? And then some people later would say "whatever happened too..." but the general consensus would still have the good feeling?


                I tend to see the worst in people though... don't want that to come off as bashing
                I honestly expect a lawsuit. If that happens, it will be HUGE!!!(At least i think it will)
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                • #9
                  Yea I hope the Lions get involved here. If the man has a chance to make some real money in the NFL, they tell him he can get in then they snatch it away. I hope he wins. If he gets cut and not claimed on waivers, then let hime go back to the army, not one week before training camp.
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                  • #10
                    Army say's Campbell can't play until 2010 - Full article

                    Army changes mind, says Campbell can't play in NFL until 2010
                    ESPN.com news services

                    Updated: July 23, 2008, 10:41 PM ET

                    Caleb Campbell Unable To Play For Lions ALLEN PARK, Mich. -- Caleb Campbell was a day away from practicing with the Detroit Lions and taking a step toward his dream of playing in the NFL.

                    "He was issued a helmet, ready to go," coach Rod Marinelli said Wednesday.

                    Now, Campbell, who was the Lions seventh-round draft pick, is closer to joining his fellow West Point graduates in Iraq or Afghanistan.

                    "When I got drafted, I told people that I was going to have the best of both worlds," Campbell said. "I was going to be in the United States Army and I was going to have a chance to play professional football. Now, I have the best of one world and I'm very positive about that. It's all going to work out.

                    "I'm in great shape and I'm going to stay in great shape. I'm going to fulfil my duty to the United States Army and do what I've got to do. One day, hopefully I'll get another opportunty to play in the NFL."

                    The U.S. Army revised its interpretation of U.S. Department of Defense policy two weeks ago regarding soldiers playing professional sports, requiring cadets to complete two years of active duty before applying for a release. Campbell and the Lions didn't officially receive notice of the change until the eve of training camp.

                    "It's unfortunate, but it doesn't mean Caleb Campbell's dream is dead. It just means it will be delayed," Army spokeswoman Lt. Col. Anne Edgecomb told The Associated Press. "We want to take care of soldiers and dashing their hopes is not what we intend. But it is what it is."

                    Edgecomb said minor league baseball players Nick Hill and Milan Dinga, former West Point standouts, will be allowed to finish their seasons before eventually joining their units.

                    "We did an internal review of our policy and found that based on the DOD policy, we needed to adjust our policy," Edgecomb said Wednesday.

                    Campbell agreed to contract terms but did not sign the deal. The Lions will retain his rights until the 2009 draft, but he will not be eligible to play until 2010.

                    "Obviously, he's disappointed," said Marinelli, a Vietnam veteran. "But I obviously know what he's about. He got his orders and he's ready to report."

                    When Detroit drafted Campbell in April, it created a lot of publicity and led to some debate whether it was fair for a cadet to play pro sports while classmates were at war.

                    The buzz might have also made the Navy and Air Force bitter because their graduates were playing under different rules under the same Department of Defense directive, which was implemented in 1994, reiterated in 2007 and again just a few days after the NFL draft.

                    "The policy has not changed," Department of Defense spokeswoman Eileen Lainez said.

                    Navy Secretary Donald C. Winter ruled last month that Mitch Harris must serve a five-year active duty commitment. Harris, a 22-year-old pitcher with a 95-mph fastball, was selected by the St. Louis Cardinals in the 13th round in this year's draft.

                    Harris acknowledged being surprised by the ruling because Campbell was being allowed to pursue football while completing his military service as a recruiter and in the reserves.

                    "Army has redefined the Alternative Service Option to include playing professional sports," Navy athletic director Chet Gladchuk has said. "Our coaches are now operating under a significant handicap when recruiting head-to-head with Army. It may not be reflected on the playing field today, but I can guarantee you that it will result in a competitive disadvantage down the road."

                    The Air Force agreed, saying the academies recruit cadets from the same pool of candidates.

                    Last month, the Army embraced the advantage.

                    "The real advantage for the Army is just the amount of publicity we get," Edgecomb said in an AP story published on June 13. "When you think about it, who's the best recruiter for the Navy you can think of? David Robinson. He's called the Admiral, for goodness sake. The attention that we get in our primary demographic to have someone playing sports who's in the Army, that's where [we] in the Army see the advantage in this program."

                    Before he became a superstar center with the San Antonio Spurs, Robinson served two years of active duty for the Navy after graduating from the academy in the 1980s. He benefited from a policy that allowed him to apply for an early release to pursue "an activity with potential recruiting or public affairs benefit to the Navy and Marine Corps."

                    In 1986, Navy running back Napoleon McCallum played his rookie year with the Los Angeles Raiders while stationed at the Long Beach, Calif., naval base.

                    The Army changed its policy on July 8, but it wasn't until July 23 that the Lions received a letter from U.S. Army Lt. Col. Jonathan P. Liba, informing them in writing that Campbell had to cease playing football in order to perform "full time traditional military duties," until at least 2010.

                    "It's unfortunate that the timing of the new policy is happening at the same time that he was about to begin trying out, but that's not something we planned," Edgecomb said. "But he's been at West Point for four years and he went there to be an officer. What he's accomplished on a football field has been outstanding, but what he'll accomplish as a soldier will be even greater."



                    ESPN.com's Kevin Seifert and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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                    • #11
                      This guy won't sue, and most likely doesn' t have a leg to stand on.

                      The NFL is no different than any OTHER job in this country. They cant just let people out of their CONTRACTUAL agreement to the US military simply to carry out a separate and different career. That completely voids the contract that they signed with the military. There would be no purpose in signing contracts with the military, thus the military would no longer offer the financial benefits that they offer in exchange for such contracts.

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                      • #12
                        I would be fien with this if he had been told he couldnt play until 2010. However, they didnt. They allowed him to be drafted, and to attend mini camps. This is a shame on the army for handling it this way. They had a great tool for recruiting athletes and just fine young men and women in general by doing this, and I was ok with that. If he had been told he needed to serve his two years, and then he would be eligble to opt out, that would have been fine as well. An AFA grad Chris Gizzi did just that, and played for the Packers.

                        Best wishes to Caleb. Get on the boat, do your duty, and come home safe .
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                        • #13
                          I have seen so many guys get to dodge Iraq because of personal issues at home. I have seen special orders given to people in special situations. I happens everyday.

                          The Amry could hook this guy up if they wanted. But they are going to ruin his once in a life time opportunity.
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                          • #14
                            When I heard this I was like, "WHAT?!?!" If I was him, I would be so damn pissed off. It's just one of so many reasons why I would NEVER EVER be suckered into joining the Military. Sorry to be blunt and sound selfish but hey whatever.
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