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Embracing The Mobile/Athletic QB

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  • #31
    Originally posted by CanDB View Post
    Hey Dennis, if nothing else I come away with a greater appreciation of your background, and the very interesting parallels in our football lives.
    Same here...who would've thought
    "There is no plan B. Plan A is to win the Super Bowl" - John Elway
    PLAN A ACCOMPLISHED 2/7/16!!!
    LSU 15-0 2019 BCS Champions...Geaux Tigers :dance:

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    • #32
      Daniel Jones is the perfect QB...imo. Smart quick release and MOBILE. I want my QB to make plays through the air 1st and foremost and make plays with his legs when needed.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by JvDub95 View Post
        Daniel Jones is the perfect QB...imo. Smart quick release and MOBILE. I want my QB to make plays through the air 1st and foremost and make plays with his legs when needed.
        That's the flavour I'm looking towards....and not flavour of the month. Pass first, but know when to extend, and when to take off. A drop back passer with an inability to run is a liability on a team with a weaker blocking unit.

        I was a bit surprised watching Mayfield last night, as he seems quite mobile, but because he was under some attack he tended to stretch the play, but forcing himself into low pass completion % football. The Rams kept him in some trouble most of the game, and I actually thought he was not helping himself. Hey, being elusive is nice, but not as easy as it looks.

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        • #34
          Found this recent article interesting, and relevant to this thread...

          https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/nfl...nfl/ar-AAHMJJe

          Mobility Key For Young QBs Thrown Onto Field Early In NFL

          (By TERESA M. WALKER 17 hrs ago)

          It's an NFL rite each season that young quarterbacks find themselves playing early whether because of high draft status, injuries or simply a struggling team looking for a spark.

          Injuries already have forced Gardner Minshew of the Jaguars, Mason Rudolph in Pittsburgh and Kyle Allen of Carolina into the lineup, while the Giants decided the future is now in turning from Eli Manning to Daniel Jones.

          They're all getting their chance to show what they can do with Dwayne Haskins potentially on deck soon in Washington.

          They often find themselves behind porous offensive lines or facing defenses that make getting the ball out quickly a challenge. So the ability to extend plays against NFL pressure is the biggest key - even if athleticism comes in a lot of different ways for quarterbacks, according to Jaguars offensive coordinator John DeFilippo.

          ''There are a lot of guys like Nick Foles, Tom Brady, who aren't the fastest guys out there, but have tremendous pocket athleticism in terms of being able to throw off-balanced, being able to move in the pocket and keep their feet in the throw,'' DeFilippo said.

          ''Pocket athleticism and playing quarterback in this league is a very huge attribute to have.''

          Some of the younger quarterbacks are also quick on their feet. Baltimore's Lamar Jackson ranks in the top 20 of the NFL's leading rushers, while Arizona drafted Kyler Murray with the No. 1 overall pick in April for that reason. Patrick Mahomes of Kansas City won the 2018 NFL MVP award by making plays in and out of the pocket.

          The New York Giants turned to Jones, the sixth pick overall in April out of Duke, looking to someone who brings more mobility to the quarterback position than Eli Manning. The 38-year-old veteran has only seven career rushing touchdowns and never averaged more than 2.2 rushing attempts a game in any of his previous 15 seasons.

          Jones ran for 1,323 yards and 17 touchdowns in his career at Duke, and he debuted Sunday by becoming the first rookie quarterback since 1970 with at least 300 yards passing, two TD passes and two rushing TDs in a single game leading the Giants to a 32-31 win over Tampa Bay.

          Surviving in the NFL as a young quarterback means being able to move. That doesn't mean running as well as Lamar Jackson. Gardner Minshew, Kyle Allen and even Daniel Jones are showing that being able to elude pressure is a must to keep throwing the ball.

          The rookie ran only once during the preseason, though Giants coach Pat Shurmur said that wasn't to hide Jones' legs. ''There was only one call there that was going to become a potential run,'' Shurmur said. ''Most of the running around were drop back passes where he felt like it was right to scramble.''

          Minshew averaged only 2.1 yards rushing at Washington State last season. Now filling in for Foles, Minshew ran for 56 yards on six carries in a 13-12 loss to Houston in the first start of his NFL career, including an 18-yard run on fourth-and-10 that gave the Jaguars a chance at a late comeback. He ran four times for 18 yards in Jacksonville's 20-7 victory over Tennessee.

          Titans linebacker Jayon Brown said Minshew did everything he needed to win. Minshew's rushing helped the Jaguars (1-2) finish with 88 yards on the ground. ''When the rush lanes were there, he took advantage of it, scrambled and made plays,'' Brown said.
          Minshew still has some ''happy feet'' moving a bit too much in the pocket, and DeFilippo would like the sixth-round pick to slide a bit earlier too.

          ''We've talked about that,'' DeFilippo said. ''That just comes with experience and playing time.''

          With Cam Newton recovering from a mid-foot sprain, the Panthers are keeping Allen, who went undrafted in 2018 out of college, at quarterback for his third career start. Allen averaged only 1.3 yard per carry in college at Texas A&M and Houston with three TD runs. Allen had three rushes in Carolina's 38-20 win at Arizona and finished with minus-1 yard.

          Carolina coach Ron Rivera has no issues with Allen's legs. ''Well I think he has just enough mobility to get him out of some situations,'' Rivera said. ''Once he got a feel for things, he was able to kind of walk away - well I shouldn't say walk - move away from the pressure, and he handled that very well.''

          Surviving to take the next snap or play the next game is what matters most.
          ---
          AP Sports Writers Tom Canavan, Mark Long, Steve Reed, Will Graves and David Brandt contributed to this report.

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          • #35
            Not to try to "emphasize" my take, but the 2 leading MVP candidates are Wilson and Jackson (with McCaffrey still in the race), and the last winner was Mahomes. Three highly mobile/athletic/versatile QBs, who can pass.

            IMO...Deshaun Watson has the capability of winning the award in the not too distant future. Overall, I think the league will be loaded with these type of leaders, as each year progresses.

            Clearly, players like Brady are exceptional. Not knocking the "in the pocket slingers". Brady may not scare you on the run, but he has "some" evasiveness when pressured. But it must drive Ds crazy trying to defend QBs who can throw really well, but escape pressure with their feet.

            And not a big deal, but QBs are still tracking very well in the rushing category, with 5 in the top 50, and 8 in the top 60.
            Last edited by CanDB; 11-11-2019, 03:24 PM.

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            • #36
              I agree, I get sick with this pocket qb crap.
              Until we get a TRUE qb we will miss the playoffs and be average at best! I'm E2DS and I approve this message!

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              • #37
                It’ll be interesting to see how Jackson’s success this season will impact athletic QBs draft status going forward. Jalen Hurts isn’t the runner or the passer Jackson is but I’m hearing that some people think he may be a first round pick.

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                • #38
                  Based on early reviews, the 2020 QB draft class might be a god one, with possibly a handful going in the 1st round.....and a number of them are quite athletic/mobile.

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                  • #39
                    Based on the All Pro team, the mobile, athletic, passing QB is back big time. Jackson and Wilson. Two of the finest examples of this style, and I would say, trend.

                    The Pro Bowl includes both players, along with Mahomes and Watson. The other two, Brees and Rodgers have shown some solid ability to maneuver over the years, though not quite as mobile in that sense as the other four.

                    I am not averse to a good drop back passer, who has escape skills. But the four above are truly amazing QBs, who can run and throw with an abundance of talent.

                    Our new guy Lock is not a run first type....more of a dart thrower on the surface. But he has wheels, and the fact he has only been sacked 5 times in 5 games, tells me he is quite adept at making room for himself, throwing the ball away quickly, and yes, being a rushing threat.
                    Last edited by CanDB; 01-03-2020, 05:00 PM.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by CanDB View Post
                      Based on the All Pro team, the mobile, athletic, passing QB is back big time. Jackson and Wilson. Two of the finest examples of this style, and I would say, trend.

                      The Pro Bowl includes both players, along with Mahomes and Watson. The other two, Brees and Rodgers have shown some solid ability to maneuver over the years, though not quite as mobile in that sense as the other four.

                      I am not averse to a good drop back passer, who has escape skills. But the four above are truly amazing QBs, who can run and throw with an abundance of talent.

                      Our new guy Lock is not a run first type....more of a dart thrower on the surface. But he has wheels, and the fact he has only been sacked 5 times in 5 games, tells me he is quite adept at making room for himself, throwing the ball away quickly, and yes, being a rushing threat.
                      Mobile QB's do not tend to work out and have success, Jackson is an exception to the rule and there is no one like him, but he still needs to prove the option style of offense will work in the playoffs and over the next 2-3 seasons. I have seen these funky type of offenses before and they normally have a limited shelf life. I think we need to revisit LJ in 2 seasons.

                      Mahomes and Wilson are exceptional passing QB's. They are mobile and can scramble for yards but do not tend to do this too often, they have success because they are clutch and very good deep ball passers. Watson is similar but a level or 2 below PM and RW.

                      Lock is that type of QB as well, he is agile and can move around but his success will be determined over his passing game.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by bronx_2003 View Post
                        Mobile QB's do not tend to work out and have success, Jackson is an exception to the rule and there is no one like him, but he still needs to prove the option style of offense will work in the playoffs and over the next 2-3 seasons. I have seen these funky type of offenses before and they normally have a limited shelf life. I think we need to revisit LJ in 2 seasons.

                        Mahomes and Wilson are exceptional passing QB's. They are mobile and can scramble for yards but do not tend to do this too often, they have success because they are clutch and very good deep ball passers. Watson is similar but a level or 2 below PM and RW.

                        Lock is that type of QB as well, he is agile and can move around but his success will be determined over his passing game.
                        Maybe we have a slightly different interpretation of what a mobile/athletic/passing QB is, but I do think that Jackson is already a success, and only into year 2. As for Russ Wilson, the other All Pro, he is the essence of that description. When the game is on the line, he seems to run more.

                        I would also say that Watson is very mobile, as is Josh Allen, and a number of today's QBs. Mahomes does tend to pass, but he is very mobile. He could run more, but chooses his strong arm more often in those cases.

                        As for Lock....I would describe him more as a passer, but that he is athletic enough to look for yardage on the ground when he sees the opportunity.

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                        • #42
                          "Thrown Onto Field Early"

                          That is the key, not only with "mobile, athletic" quarterbacks, not only with quarterbacks, but all young potential filled players. This idea of quarterback development from the sideline is a complete myth, that bad teams tell themselves is the right thing to do, but it always fails. Teams like to go into camp with quarterback competitions, or handing veterans the job, despite this never working out. My question would be, when was the last time a quarterback competition worked out for the short and long term of the team ?

                          When did that team emerge with their future quarterback, or when did that team go on to have playoff success ? It just isn't a proven recipe for success. I think the key with all these young guys, mobile quarterbacks, pocket passers, whatever, to get them on the field early. You develop playing, and getting these guys into games, building game plans around them, giving them practice reps and mental reps through the week, that is the best approach.

                          I made a thread about delaying the inevitable with Flacco and Lock at the start of the season, and as it always does, it panned out exactly as it should when you look at recent, and past examples. I like what Baltimore are doing on offense, not just because they are tailoring an offense to their quarterbacks skill set, all good coaches should do that, but because they committed to a young guy, allowed him to get experience, and are invested in helping him grow.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by CanDB View Post
                            Maybe we have a slightly different interpretation of what a mobile/athletic/passing QB is, but I do think that Jackson is already a success, and only into year 2. As for Russ Wilson, the other All Pro, he is the essence of that description. When the game is on the line, he seems to run more.

                            I would also say that Watson is very mobile, as is Josh Allen, and a number of today's QBs. Mahomes does tend to pass, but he is very mobile. He could run more, but chooses his strong arm more often in those cases.

                            As for Lock....I would describe him more as a passer, but that he is athletic enough to look for yardage on the ground when he sees the opportunity.
                            If your talking about 'mobile' as in they use their legs to escape pressure and throw on the run or out of the pocket then yes I agree with all of them, but I only consider LJ as a running QB. The others might take off occasionally but they are passing QB's who can use their legs. If they did not have a great arm and passing ability and be able to scan the field as they do then they would be nothing.

                            To illustrate my point, LJ had over 1200 yards rushing this season. The other 3 were - 400ish, 342, and 218

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by bronx_2003 View Post
                              If your talking about 'mobile' as in they use their legs to escape pressure and throw on the run or out of the pocket then yes I agree with all of them, but I only consider LJ as a running QB. The others might take off occasionally but they are passing QB's who can use their legs. If they did not have a great arm and passing ability and be able to scan the field as they do then they would be nothing.

                              To illustrate my point, LJ had over 1200 yards rushing this season. The other 3 were - 400ish, 342, and 218
                              It is a fine line, but I believe QBs are becoming better equipped to throw and run of late. Jackson is an anomaly, given no one has ever been as effective in one season (IMO) with his legs and arm. But I am talking about QBs who can run with some skill. Looking at the game today, Josh Allen certainly is included in the conversation. And Wilson has long been one of those players. I see more of it these days.

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                              • #45
                                Another thing to ponder with the Ravens success, not only did they build their offense around Jackson to accentuate what he does best, but they also built an offense that is a complete 180 from what the rest of the NFL is doing. Defenses are gearing up to stop passing attacks these days and since teams have gone to a passing approach on offense their offenses have been geared towards that. The Ravens have turned back the hands of time and are going with a physical smash mouth approach with a lot of big strong physical players.

                                The offense itself isn’t revolutionary but the timing of it is what makes it so hard to defend. Teams just aren’t built to stop that run game.

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