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  1. #1
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    Former Denver Mayor Proposes Fanbase to have the rights to Mile High

    Here's an article I found as far as the current predicament to Mile High's naming rights. I'm on moblie right now so I dunno if the link will work, and I won't be able to quote the full article.

    https://www.denverpost.com/2018/01/3...llington-webb/

    Interesting to say the least. If the former mayor gets enough support for this idea, then the organization might, and that's a big MIGHT, give in and have the name Mile High Stadium for the rest of the current stadium's existence. Then we could use the strategy I mentioned in a previous thread in order to have more money given than a corporate business.

  2. #2
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    And picking up where the above post left off...

    https://www.denverpost.com/2018/01/3...iums-heritage/

    Former Denver Mayor Wellington Webb has a grand idea for a noble and worthy cause: resurrecting Mile High as the pure and true moniker of the Broncos’ stadium.

    That is, after all, what the stadium would still be named if we lived in a world where the value of naming rights wasn’t millions of dollars. It’s a financial temptation so real that few stadiums in the country have passed up the money-making opportunity of selling their venue’s name.

    Which is how we ended up with Invesco Field at Mile High and then Sports Authority Field at Mile High.

    Webb wants Coloradans — loyal fans who not only love the Broncos but remember the glory days of the South Stands — to rally together and buy the naming rights so the Broncos can once again play at Mile High Stadium. We’d support such an effort. Who knows how many big-league donors could be lured to donate a cool million in exchange for some kind of special memorial brick or seat at the stadium or how many every day Coloradans would chip in their $10 to a crowdfunding effort.

    The problem is the stakes are high.

    It’s estimated the value of the last remaining five years of Sports Authority’s naming-rights contract is $20 million. Donating to a cause that would resurrect “Mile High” for such a short period for so much money is hard to imagine.

    Invesco Funds Group, Inc. was willing to pay $120 million over 20 years for the advertising potential, and after the company hit financial troubles in 2011, Sports Authority stepped in and assumed the remainder of that contract. Sports Authority lasted six years before biting the dust of bankruptcy last year and relinquishing the naming rights back to the quasi-governmental metropolitan agency that used taxpayer dollars to help build the stadium. The Broncos acquired the naming rights and hired a marketer to find a company willing to buy them.

    The curse of Mile High appears to be real. Two companies in a row have folded while holding the naming rights. Fear of a similar fate might make bidders for the rights hard to come by, leaving an opening for a non-profit to steal the name away at a bargain.

    Consider the deal Coors scored when it purchased the naming rights of Coors Field, the baseball stadium for the Rockies, in perpetuity for a mere $15 million. We have bemoaned the sweetheart deal early investors in the baseball stadium received, but in retrospect, the consistency in the naming rights has helped create the very sense of place we are trying to protect at Mile High.

    Coors Field rolls off the tongue today, nearly three decades later, as naturally as Red Rocks Amphitheater or the Denver Coliseum.

    Such consistency for our football stadium is a laudable goal.

    We have come to appreciate, however, that our stadium districts and other public venues need consistent funding sources. The Metropolitan Football Stadium District needs to continue to maintain and modernize the stadium. In 2016 the district received more money from its naming rights than it did from the franchise payments: $3.6 million and $3.4 million respectively.

    Giving up or donating a portion of that revenue stream could jeopardize the future of the stadium or force the district to ask voters for another supporting sales tax.

    But Webb has long found success shooting for big, impossible dreams for our city, and we second what he told Denver Post reporter Danika Worthington: “If it hasn’t been tried before, so what? This is Denver, this is Colorado, we try things that are different. Why do we have to be like everybody else?”
    I am REALLY interested to see how this will turn out.

  3. #3
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    I think it should be called Denver Mile High. If businesses feel it's a good investment to sponsor the stadium to brand their companies, then it should be a good investment for branding Denver. Denver generates money from business and tourism so it would seem that it would be good from a branding point of view if every time an event was held there the media, both national and local, would say "Denver Mile High". Las Vegas and other cities spend a lot more paying for advertising for their cities and states.

    I'd suggest "Colorado Mile High" to expand the base a bit, but Colorado isn't a mile high like Denver is.

    Again, for me the question is why are naming rights good for a business but not for the city?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by lvbronx View Post
    I think it should be called Denver Mile High. If businesses feel it's a good investment to sponsor the stadium to brand their companies, then it should be a good investment for branding Denver. Denver generates money from business and tourism so it would seem that it would be good from a branding point of view if every time an event was held there the media, both national and local, would say "Denver Mile High". Las Vegas and other cities spend a lot more paying for advertising for their cities and states.

    I'd suggest "Colorado Mile High" to expand the base a bit, but Colorado isn't a mile high like Denver is.

    Again, for me the question is why are naming rights good for a business but not for the city?
    Leadville and Fairplay are almost two miles high and plenty of other places are well over a mile high including Colorado Springs on the Front Range.
    "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by lvbronx View Post
    I think it should be called Denver Mile High. If businesses feel it's a good investment to sponsor the stadium to brand their companies, then it should be a good investment for branding Denver. Denver generates money from business and tourism so it would seem that it would be good from a branding point of view if every time an event was held there the media, both national and local, would say "Denver Mile High". Las Vegas and other cities spend a lot more paying for advertising for their cities and states.
    Where do I begin to address everything wrong with this name? I understand it's just an opinion, but some opinions do have things wrong in them.

    For example, "Denver Mile High" is in no way going to roll off the tongue like the OG name, Mile High Stadium. A lot of people want to stick with the old names, despite an organization branding businesses like Invesco or Sports Authority.

    Another thing to consider is that "Mile High Stadium" is such a historic name. Historic names like that are going to attract a lot more people because it shows how old a team is, and it was the name of a stadium where a team garnered a huge success rate, and a social epidemic called "Broncomania" which will probably never be topped until we surge back into relevance after a point where the team sucks again for a few years.

    As for your question, money. It's all about the money these days. Today's culture is that if you don't have money you'll never live. It's truly pathetic seeing that America has gone away from the mentality that the people is what drives America to greatness in favor of coporate people who only care about money and nothing else.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by DwhitetheGamer View Post
    Where do I begin to address everything wrong with this name? I understand it's just an opinion, but some opinions do have things wrong in them.

    For example, "Denver Mile High" is in no way going to roll off the tongue like the OG name, Mile High Stadium. A lot of people want to stick with the old names, despite an organization branding businesses like Invesco or Sports Authority.

    Another thing to consider is that "Mile High Stadium" is such a historic name. Historic names like that are going to attract a lot more people because it shows how old a team is, and it was the name of a stadium where a team garnered a huge success rate, and a social epidemic called "Broncomania" which will probably never be topped until we surge back into relevance after a point where the team sucks again for a few years.

    As for your question, money. It's all about the money these days. Today's culture is that if you don't have money you'll never live. It's truly pathetic seeing that America has gone away from the mentality that the people is what drives America to greatness in favor of coporate people who only care about money and nothing else.
    As a marketer, the reason to include "Denver" in the name is because of branding. Every time the stadium is mentioned on TV or reported in the print media "Denver" will be used.

    My question about money was rhetorical, as I have a pretty good idea why to use "Denver" and know many people won't grasp the power of branding. While Mile High is "historic", it doesn't brand or promote anything. The tax payers of Denver and Colorado would be footing the bill and should be able to expect a good return on their investment. The concept of branding Denver should be part of the "sell" to get the public to agree with footing the bill for naming rights and to get the maximum ROI.

    The power of branding has been proven over and over. When someone in charge decides where to build an Amazon center or hold a convention they are more likely to choose somewhere they are familiar with. This is the genius of the slogan "what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas". People repeat this over and over in jokes and conversations, giving Las Vegas free branding that influences decisions down the road.

    And this is why businesses sponsor arenas and stadiums, to get their names mentioned. From a business perspective Denver and Colorado can benefit in the same way.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by samparnell View Post
    Leadville and Fairplay are almost two miles high and plenty of other places are well over a mile high including Colorado Springs on the Front Range.
    And the 50+ 14ers are almost 3 miles high.

    This is why "Colorado Mile High" doesn't make sense...
    Last edited by lvbronx; 02-03-2018 at 03:50 PM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by lvbronx View Post
    And the 50+ 14ers are almost 3 miles high.

    This is why "Colorado Mile High" doesn't make sense...
    Well, I think the average elevation of the State of Colorado is 6,800' asl.
    "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

  9. #9
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    I like Quasi-Governmental Metropolitan Agency field at Mile High Stadium. It has a ring to it.
    ~In Partibus Infidelium~

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