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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by RSH View Post
    And look at the Broncos' new running backs coach, who was Chip Kelly's offensive coordinator in San Francisco. The Broncos' new wide receivers coach has spent most of his time coaching in college. The Broncos' offensive line-tackles coach spent 19 years coaching in college except for last year in Denver.

    As Vance Joseph has frequently stated this offseason, more spread concepts and RPOs are coming to Denver's offense next season. The quantity will be based on the quarterback(s) the Broncos sign and/or draft.
    Right. Curtis Modkins has been coaching for 21 years, ten of those in the NFL. He has coached on both sides of the ball and been an OC in the NFL.

    Zach Azzani worked under Urban Meyer for three years.

    Chris Strausser has been coaching 29 years and, as you say, 19 of which were O-Line. Before coming to Denver, he was at University of Washington and Boise State prior to that.

    Denver's other O-Line coach, Sean Kugler, has been coaching 27 years, 14 at the college level and 3 at HS. He was HC at UTEP for five years before joining the Broncos.
    "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Champ>NFL View Post
    As, chris harris said,

    Like I said, they run this college offense," Haris said after the 53-21 loss. "They kind of run what the Chiefs do. They have the option to run, option to pass, they run the read-option, they run the real option. He is checking into a lot of things. I mean, it just a college offense, so he is just executing it very well."


    If the Broncos lost 53-21 just because it was a college offense, that's a condemnation of the Broncos' defense, not their offense.

    The Broncos need to identify their quarterback(preferably not Kirk Cousins) and focus on his strengths.
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  3. #63
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    The debate about pro football using concepts which originated in college or high school football is kind of pointless, because in its entire history the NFL has benefitted from expertise that has come from college. Some of the NFL's most innovative coaches had strong backgrounds at the college and high school levels.

    When the NFL began in 1920, they used a college offense, the Single Wing/Double Wing which was invented by Glenn S. "Pop" Warner at Carlisle Indian School in 1906. It was a college offense. Did the NFL develop their own style of offense right away? No, the Single/Double Wing dominated the NFL for over twenty years.

    When George Halas wanted to use the T Formation, he went to college coaches Clark Shaughnessy, Dana Bible, Frank Leahy and Don Faurot for their expertise in adapting it for pro football.

    Sid Gillman coached at the college level for twenty years before becoming an NFL head coach.

    Paul Brown was a HS coach for ten years before coaching college for five years after which he became head coach of the Cleveland Browns.

    Vince Lombardi was a high school coach for eight years before coaching in college for seven years. He wanted to be a college head coach, but began his pro coaching career as a coordinator with the Giants when he concluded no college would hire him as HC.

    Hank Stram was a college coach for eleven years before becoming head coach of the Dallas Texans, who morphed into the Kansas City Chiefs, of the AFL in 1960.

    Don Coryell was a college coach for twenty-two years before becoming an NFL HC. Before Air Coryell, he was closely connected with the origins of the I Formation.

    Bill Walsh was a high school coach before going back and forth between college and NFL teams for thirty-four years.

    Joe Gibbs coached at the college level for nine years before becoming a head coach in the NFL. He said he stole the idea for his Counter Series from Tom Osborne.

    All of these guys were innovators at the pro level. Their ideas developed in the world of football they knew which was mostly college.

    Besides RPO another offensive concept run by every NFL team is Bunch/Bunch routes. IDK about inventing it, but two high school coaches, Andrew Coverdale and Dan Robinson, have developed Bunch more than anyone else of whom I am aware. So, football is football no matter where it comes from and can be adapted at any level. Doug Pederson was a high school coach for four years before becoming an NFL assistant under Andy Reid.

    It has been a while since a college coach has had the kind of success enjoyed by those listed above. After coaching at the college level for ten years, Pete Carroll had mixed success in the NFL. He coached at USC for nine years before returning to the NFL where it has gone well.

    However, it hasn't gone well for Dan Devine, Chuck Fairbanks, Butch Davis, Steve Spurrier, Bobby Petrino, Nick Saban and Chip Kelly. Can anyone think of a successful NFL coach who came from college fairly recently? Barry Switzer in the Nineties is the most recent I can think of, or Dick Vermeil who went to the Eagles from college and then had a stint as a broadcaster before coming back to coach the Rams to a championship in SB XXXIV. Jim Harbaugh comes to mind.
    "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by samparnell View Post
    The debate about pro football using concepts which originated in college or high school football is kind of pointless, because in its entire history the NFL has benefitted from expertise that has come from college. Some of the NFL's most innovative coaches had strong backgrounds at the college and high school levels.

    When the NFL began in 1920, they used a college offense, the Single Wing/Double Wing which was invented by Glenn S. "Pop" Warner at Carlisle Indian School in 1906. It was a college offense. Did the NFL develop their own style of offense right away? No, the Single/Double Wing dominated the NFL for over twenty years.

    When George Halas wanted to use the T Formation, he went to college coaches Clark Shaughnessy, Dana Bible, Frank Leahy and Don Faurot for their expertise in adapting it for pro football.

    Sid Gillman coached at the college level for twenty years before becoming an NFL head coach.

    Paul Brown was a HS coach for ten years before coaching college for five years after which he became head coach of the Cleveland Browns.

    Vince Lombardi was a high school coach for eight years before coaching in college for seven years. He wanted to be a college head coach, but began his pro coaching career as a coordinator with the Giants when he concluded no college would hire him as HC.

    Hank Stram was a college coach for eleven years before becoming head coach of the Dallas Texans, who morphed into the Kansas City Chiefs, of the AFL in 1960.

    Don Coryell was a college coach for twenty-two years before becoming an NFL HC. Before Air Coryell, he was closely connected with the origins of the I Formation.

    Bill Walsh was a high school coach before going back and forth between college and NFL teams for thirty-four years.

    Joe Gibbs coached at the college level for nine years before becoming a head coach in the NFL. He said he stole the idea for his Counter Series from Tom Osborne.

    All of these guys were innovators at the pro level. Their ideas developed in the world of football they knew which was mostly college.

    Besides RPO another offensive concept run by every NFL team is Bunch/Bunch routes. IDK about inventing it, but two high school coaches, Andrew Coverdale and Dan Robinson, have developed Bunch more than anyone else of whom I am aware. So, football is football no matter where it comes from and can be adapted at any level. Doug Pederson was a high school coach for four years before becoming an NFL assistant under Andy Reid.

    It has been a while since a college coach has had the kind of success enjoyed by those listed above. After coaching at the college level for ten years, Pete Carroll had mixed success in the NFL. He coached at USC for nine years before returning to the NFL where it has gone well.

    However, it hasn't gone well for Dan Devine, Chuck Fairbanks, Butch Davis, Steve Spurrier, Bobby Petrino, Nick Saban and Chip Kelly. Can anyone think of a successful NFL coach who came from college fairly recently? Barry Switzer in the Nineties is the most recent I can think of, or Dick Vermeil who went to the Eagles from college and then had a stint as a broadcaster before coming back to coach the Rams to a championship in SB XXXIV. Jim Harbaugh comes to mind.
    i think may be a few out there but that about the on i can think of

    oakland raders gm
    latavis murray trade bait

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Champ>NFL View Post
    Thatís what they said about Nick Foles and Case kenum. Hoyer is serviceable and would be the best qb on our roster


  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Freyaka View Post
    1. He dosent cry after a big game.

    2. He got the Texans to the playoffs and started over Brock

    3. Itís a toss up over Trev, but at least hoyer dosent turn tr ball over.


    You can take your Bronco glasses off now

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Champ>NFL View Post
    1. He dosent cry after a big game.

    2. He got the Texans to the playoffs and started over Brock

    3. It’s a toss up over Trev, but at least hoyer dosent turn tr ball over.


    You can take your Bronco glasses off now
    1. meh, it is what it is but not as big a deal as people want to make it

    2. Low bar. Siemian started most of the season over Brock this year.

    3. Hoyer doesn't turn the ball over? https://www.pro-football-reference.c...H/HoyeBr00.htm
    He's had his share and they are a good part why he's bounced around the league the past few years. I mean, when you get the boot from Cleveland for throwing 12 TDs and 13 INTs, well... it isn't because the Browns decided Hoyer is a nice guy but just want to be friends.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rastic View Post
    1. meh, it is what it is but not as big a deal as people want to make it

    2. Low bar. Siemian started most of the season over Brock this year.

    3. Hoyer doesn't turn the ball over? https://www.pro-football-reference.c...H/HoyeBr00.htm
    He's had his share and they are a good part why he's bounced around the league the past few years. I mean, when you get the boot from Cleveland for throwing 12 TDs and 13 INTs, well... it isn't because the Browns decided Hoyer is a nice guy but just want to be friends.
    1. Yep Iíve seen all sorts of sb leading QBs crying after a week 16 meaingless game. Shows the meantal toughness you want from a leader...

    https://media.giphy.com/media/qRr8rV9WisagU/200w.gif

    2. Low bar? Thatís not what Yea about, itís still factually relevant hoyer>Brock

    3. Hoyer has played better than Trev itís not really debatable. He got Texans teams into the playoffs multiple time

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Champ>NFL View Post
    1. Yep I’ve seen all sorts of sb leading QBs crying after a week 16 meaingless game. Shows the meantal toughness you want from a leader...

    https://media.giphy.com/media/qRr8rV9WisagU/200w.gif

    2. Low bar? That’s not what Yea about, it’s still factually relevant hoyer>Brock

    3. Hoyer has played better than Trev it’s not really debatable. He got Texans teams into the playoffs multiple time
    2. I don't mind the comparison per se, but let's not forget the Texans rid themselves of Hoyer in favor of an unproven QB in Osweiler, hoping he could lift them at the QB position. Osweiler was released just as quick as Hoyer was, so where does that leave both of them? Both are Texans' cast offs. In my opinion, choosing between the two is a bad choice no matter who you select - one bad starting QB slightly better than another bad starting QB.

    3. Siemian outplayed Osweiler. I'm not equating Siemian and Hoyer but the distance between them is not that great to think Hoyer is servicable for the Broncos' needs, unless the need is a repeat of 2016 and 2017.

    Hoyer leading his team to the playoffs is not as impressive as it sounds. The AFC South was the worst division in 2015. The Texans were not impressive, taking the division title with a 9-7 record

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Champ>NFL View Post
    1. He dosent cry after a big game.

    2. He got the Texans to the playoffs and started over Brock

    3. Itís a toss up over Trev, but at least hoyer dosent turn tr ball over.


    You can take your Bronco glasses off now
    Hoyer threw 4 INTs and fumbled twice for a score of 30-0 in his playoff game against KC. So, no thanks.

  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by broncoslover115 View Post
    Hoyer threw 4 INTs and fumbled twice for a score of 30-0 in his playoff game against KC. So, no thanks.
    He did go 'toe to toe' with Manziel in a classic Cleveland race to the trashcan. I think he lost that one...but only by a nose.

  12. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Champ>NFL View Post
    1. He dosent cry after a big game.

    2. He got the Texans to the playoffs and started over Brock

    3. It’s a toss up over Trev, but at least hoyer dosent turn tr ball over.


    You can take your Bronco glasses off now
    Yeah, no he didn't. He was with the Texans in 2015, Osweiler signed with Houston in 2016, Hoyer played for the Bears in 2016, putting up his best career numbers while going 1-4 as a starter. Hoyer is actually 1-10 in his last 11 starts.

    The Texans chose Osweiler over Hoyer.
    "I never lose, I either win or I learn."

  13. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lumiere View Post
    He did go 'toe to toe' with Manziel in a classic Cleveland race to the trashcan. I think he lost that one...but only by a nose.

    Weird that completing 55% of his passes and throwing 12 touchdowns to 13 interceptions didn't impress them...
    "I never lose, I either win or I learn."

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lumiere View Post
    He did go 'toe to toe' with Manziel in a classic Cleveland race to the trashcan. I think he lost that one...but only by a nose.
    Quote Originally Posted by Butler By'Note View Post
    Weird that completing 55% of his passes and throwing 12 touchdowns to 13 interceptions didn't impress them...

  15. #75
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    Brian Hoyer?

    bahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha

    1-10 in his last 11 starts. hit him once and he turns into fumbletron 2000. He's a weaker armed version of Kyle Orton.


    lmao Brian Hoyer

    Hooray, beer!

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