Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Clinton, MD (via Wash., DC)
    Posts
    2,645

    So What About The New 'Alliance of American Football' League??

    http://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/2...ootball-season

    Everything you need to know about the first Alliance of American Football season

    SAN ANTONIO -- Competitive football could have been done until July, when college football media days and NFL training camps once again popped into the public eye. But the eight-team Alliance of American Football, which opens with two games on Saturday night (San Diego at San Antonio and Atlanta at Orlando), marks the debut of the upstart league on CBS.

    It's not quite the NFL, and it's not quite college football, either. It's being billed as a developmental league that is trying to be an augmentation to the NFL season, according to league co-founder Bill Polian, with a bunch of things that will look the same and some that will look markedly different from the football to which you are accustomed.

    With a 10-game regular-season schedule, the inaugural campaign will culminate in an April 27 championship game. You probably have a lot of questions about the AAF -- its teams, players, rules and more -- so here's our primer on all the big topics:


    Where can I watch?

    A combination of places: online, on broadcast networks, on cable and potentially on your phone. CBS will broadcast the two opening-night games (most of the country will see San Diego at San Antonio while some will get Atlanta at Orlando) and CBS Sports Network will televise one game a week. NFL Network will show 19 games -- starting with Salt Lake at Arizona in Week 1 and then two games per week following. TNT will have Salt Lake at Birmingham in Week 2 and then B-R Live will stream one game per week over the final eight weeks of the season.

    What's the overall talent level?

    The thought is that this could be comparable to what would happen if backups on NFL teams played against each other. Multiple players, coaches and Polian himself said they believe their starters could be competitive with the "twos" in the league.

    "What I want the fans to say is that it's real professional football," Polian said.


    So, will I know any of these guys?

    There will be familiar faces, primarily at quarterback, with Christian Hackenberg, Matt Simms and Aaron Murray. Trent Richardson, Matt Asiata, Bishop Sankey and Denard Robinson are running backs with NFL experience, and Scooby Wright and Sterling Moore are defensive players who have name recognition.

    The majority of "names" are the coaches: Dennis Erickson (Salt Lake), Steve Spurrier (Orlando), Mike Martz (San Diego), Mike Singletary (Memphis) and Mike Riley (San Antonio).


    Are there any rules differences from the NFL?

    There are several significant ones:

    The most notable one is no kickoffs, which is something Polian insisted on if he was going to be involved. They did this because data they collected said the kickoff was largely a non-dynamic play where the largest number of injuries occurred. Also, fans and players dislike the kickoff on the whole, and it affects overall game time. Instead, the ball starts on the 25-yard line after each score or at the start of the game.

    Instead of an onside kick, if a team is trailing by 17 points or there's five minutes or less left in the fourth quarter, a team can attempt an onside conversion. They get the ball on their own 28-yard line and have to convert a fourth-and-12. If they do, they keep the ball and keep going. Don't convert, and the opponent takes over from the point at which they stop them.

    There are no extra point kicks, so a team is going for two after every touchdown.

    Overtime rules have the ball starting on the 10-yard line with four downs and a two-point extra point if a team scores (field goals are not allowed).

    There's also a significant change in pass-rushing rules for defenses. Teams can rush only five players and can't blitz players from the secondary. If you have five men on the line of scrimmage on defense, those are the only players who can rush. "With less than a month to get our teams ready to play, the hardest part to get cohesiveness in is the offensive line," Polian said. "So if we came with all the exotic blitzes that we see, which is basically coming out of the secondary, they couldn't pick it up and we're going to get quarterbacks hurt, and it's not much of a game, honestly. Nobody wants to see the quarterback sacked repeatedly."

    With replays, officials won't have to go under the hood or watch a tablet. Instead, the official will have an earpiece to communicate directly on the field with the replay official in real time. All of this is designed to help shorten game times. The hope is for games to be two and a half hours or less.


    So, I hear this will be more interactive.

    There will be fantasy games to play through the app. You can't gamble through the app, but MGM is the "gaming partner" of the AAF -- and the thought is there will be a plethora of options both on the app and through the gaming partner to make the game more interactive. Charlie Ebersol, the other co-founder, explained the league has been building technology to give real-time data from hardware they've developed that will allow for actual real-time updates and gaming possibilities.

    "In regular fantasy, you're the team owner. In daily fantasy, you are the general manager. We believe in the game we have, you're the coach," Ebersol said. "So think of it like, instead of a fantasy manager, you're a fantasy coach. So you're going play to play, and you're looking at the predictability of what play is going to happen and which players are going to be involved and what the odds of those plays happening are. That's more of what our game is."

    That data, Ebersol hopes, also will give more of an objective view of how players are performing. Every player and every ball used in a game will have microchips embedded to accumulate and transmit data.


    How do I watch games in person?

    The league exists in eight cities in the South, Southwest and West Coast -- mostly with cities that could make sense for NFL franchises (Birmingham, San Antonio, Salt Lake City, Orlando, Memphis, San Diego) as well as two existing NFL locales (Atlanta and Arizona). Ticket packages are $75 for five home games. For the most part, games are being played in college stadiums.

    I only heard of a draft for quarterbacks. How were other players assigned?

    Three ways. First, the league figured out the top 30 NFL-producing colleges over the past 10 seasons (USC is No. 1), and gave each team three high-producing schools. Then they gave teams up to 30 other area schools in a certain range to pull allocations from.

    If a player doesn't fit that grouping, they also assigned four NFL teams to each AAF team; if a player played for a team or was in training camp with a team, then his rights were given to the respective AAF team. This was done with both geographic and population data (for instance, San Antonio has the Cowboys, Texans, Chiefs and Eagles).

    There is also at least one CFL team assigned to each team. If a player hits none of these lists, then there was a first-come, first-served rights list of 25 players. If multiple teams put in a request for the same player, they went by their waiver list.

    "We may tweak it depending on what we see, but the concept is good," Polian said. "We know the concept is good, because it's working."

    That placed Richardson on Birmingham, Murray on Atlanta and Asiata on Salt Lake City, for example.


    What about player salaries and benefits?

    The league didn't give out much in terms of financial deals, but the players all signed three-year, $250,000 contracts. Every player is on the same deal. If they finish a year in the league, they'll also get a stipend for secondary education. There's also an internship program. Contracts also have bonuses tied into them depending on hitting both on- and off-field incentives.

    What's the long-term hope for the league?

    Polian and Ebersol want to work to be a complement to the NFL, and Polian said he's open to suggestions from the league. As for what they are hoping for by the end of this season?

    "I want folks who know football to say, 'Hey, this is pretty good football and it'll get better and it got better during the year,'" Polian said. "We're going to be a lot better on the 27th of April than we'll be on the 9th of February. Teams get better as they practice and play together. That's No. 1.

    "No. 2, I want people to say that it's an interesting and exciting game."


    Special thanks to Sam_Z for the SB rings collage above

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Posts
    13,761
    I was excited for it, until today, I read a story on PFT that they have strict rules on rushing the passer. Defenses may only ever bring 5 defenders at a time, and the defenders have to be no more than 2 yards outside the tackle, and within 5 yards of the line of scrimmage at the time of the snap in order for them to rush the passer. So no corner or safety blitzes. And teams can't even disguise blitzes by bumping an LB out into a coverage position and then bringing them.

    https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.co...ts-on-blitzes/

    To me that completely invalidates what the league is doing, and essentially makes them a joke before they even kickoff...oh wait they don't have kickoffs either. Complete waste of time, hopefully the XFL actually plays football.

    Having said that I'll probably watch a few minutes tomorrow.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    14,169
    It will be interesting and I will probably turn it on but like butler said that blitzing style isn't going to help the QBs make a jump to the nfl. In a sense that could really hurt them and the league, but they did mention it was due to trying to get the offense up to speed so hopefully it is a1 year rule. Because if not I don't any qb will ever come from this league because even colleges can do more on the defense. And who knows maybe they figure out a way on defense to still disguise the defense.

    The kick offs aren't a big deal as they do cause a bunch of injuries and hopefully cutting the game time down will be useful. The overtime rules are interesting and getting rid of the ability to kick fg was smart because now both teams know they have to score and get the 2 point conversion and there is no settling for a fg if your defense stopped the other team.

    And the ref thing will be big to see how well it works because if it works the nfl will steal it to use in its league which would be great and help get things correct and help the flow.

    Next year will be another interesting time with the XFL coming into play. Will be looking to see how they modify it to become a feeder league.

    Adopted Broncos:
    (2011-2013) Eric Decker
    (2014-current) Bradley Roby
    Adopted posters:
    Everyone

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    6,975
    Quote Originally Posted by #87Birdman View Post
    It will be interesting and I will probably turn it on but like butler said that blitzing style isn't going to help the QBs make a jump to the nfl. In a sense that could really hurt them and the league, but they did mention it was due to trying to get the offense up to speed so hopefully it is a1 year rule. Because if not I don't any qb will ever come from this league because even colleges can do more on the defense. And who knows maybe they figure out a way on defense to still disguise the defense.

    The kick offs aren't a big deal as they do cause a bunch of injuries and hopefully cutting the game time down will be useful. The overtime rules are interesting and getting rid of the ability to kick fg was smart because now both teams know they have to score and get the 2 point conversion and there is no settling for a fg if your defense stopped the other team.

    And the ref thing will be big to see how well it works because if it works the nfl will steal it to use in its league which would be great and help get things correct and help the flow.


    Next year will be another interesting time with the XFL coming into play. Will be looking to see how they modify it to become a feeder league.
    Here are the main reasons I like the idea. If the NFL works closely with this league, they can use it as a hamster for tweaks to the NFL's rules. This, instead of just changing things, and then having major backlash in the preseason or even regular season. I also like the idea of potentially having a real farm system for the NFL. The overtime rules are almost exactly what I want the NFL to go to, so I hope that plays out well.

    I kind of feel like this league could be the NFL's answer to the XFL in a way. The NFL brand is a big deal. The NFL markets it's history, and even pretends everything before the merger never happened. Just look at the NBA, for example. The NBA's history is more player oriented than team oriented. Nobody cares about the basketball Hall of Fame (well, most people don't), and it's not a league based distinction. It's closer to the College Football Hall of Fame by comparison. Unifying their brand under one league, marketing the teams and history, and creating/maintaining competitive balance are to me the biggest discerning factors that separate the NFL from the NBA. So, the last thing the NFL wants is another league screwing with that. Not that I'd say the NFL is worried about the XFL, because they squashed the XFL like a mosquito last time around. I think the XFL could have a place, if they put emphasis on "entertainment", and make their league a spectacle very dissimilar to the NFL game. The closer their product is to the NFL, the lower their chance of success, I think. I think all parties can coexist if the NFL recognizes the AAF as a supplemental entity.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    14,169
    Quote Originally Posted by Spice 1 View Post
    Here are the main reasons I like the idea. If the NFL works closely with this league, they can use it as a hamster for tweaks to the NFL's rules. This, instead of just changing things, and then having major backlash in the preseason or even regular season. I also like the idea of potentially having a real farm system for the NFL. The overtime rules are almost exactly what I want the NFL to go to, so I hope that plays out well.

    I kind of feel like this league could be the NFL's answer to the XFL in a way. The NFL brand is a big deal. The NFL markets it's history, and even pretends everything before the merger never happened. Just look at the NBA, for example. The NBA's history is more player oriented than team oriented. Nobody cares about the basketball Hall of Fame (well, most people don't), and it's not a league based distinction. It's closer to the College Football Hall of Fame by comparison. Unifying their brand under one league, marketing the teams and history, and creating/maintaining competitive balance are to me the biggest discerning factors that separate the NFL from the NBA. So, the last thing the NFL wants is another league screwing with that. Not that I'd say the NFL is worried about the XFL, because they squashed the XFL like a mosquito last time around. I think the XFL could have a place, if they put emphasis on "entertainment", and make their league a spectacle very dissimilar to the NFL game. The closer their product is to the NFL, the lower their chance of success, I think. I think all parties can coexist if the NFL recognizes the AAF as a supplemental entity.
    I don't think the XFL had any intention of competing with the NFL. I think it's competition is going to be the AAF. So it will come down to who can make a better farm league and they will be competing against who can pay more also. It will get interesting and I wouldn't be surprised if these two leagues end up merging in the future if they both prove to work. Because I believe both these issues will fall in the winter and spring.

    Adopted Broncos:
    (2011-2013) Eric Decker
    (2014-current) Bradley Roby
    Adopted posters:
    Everyone

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    6,975
    Quote Originally Posted by #87Birdman View Post
    I don't think the XFL had any intention of competing with the NFL. I think it's competition is going to be the AAF. So it will come down to who can make a better farm league and they will be competing against who can pay more also. It will get interesting and I wouldn't be surprised if these two leagues end up merging in the future if they both prove to work. Because I believe both these issues will fall in the winter and spring.
    From a ratings perspective, yes. What I'm saying is if the XFL is successful, and gets to a point where it's competing with the NFL for players, you wind up with a USFL situation. That's not likely to happen, of course, but I can definitely see why the NFL would want control over a secondary league.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    15,306
    Quote Originally Posted by Spice 1 View Post
    Here are the main reasons I like the idea. If the NFL works closely with this league, they can use it as a hamster for tweaks to the NFL's rules. This, instead of just changing things, and then having major backlash in the preseason or even regular season. I also like the idea of potentially having a real farm system for the NFL. The overtime rules are almost exactly what I want the NFL to go to, so I hope that plays out well.

    I kind of feel like this league could be the NFL's answer to the XFL in a way. The NFL brand is a big deal. The NFL markets it's history, and even pretends everything before the merger never happened. Just look at the NBA, for example. The NBA's history is more player oriented than team oriented. Nobody cares about the basketball Hall of Fame (well, most people don't), and it's not a league based distinction. It's closer to the College Football Hall of Fame by comparison. Unifying their brand under one league, marketing the teams and history, and creating/maintaining competitive balance are to me the biggest discerning factors that separate the NFL from the NBA. So, the last thing the NFL wants is another league screwing with that. Not that I'd say the NFL is worried about the XFL, because they squashed the XFL like a mosquito last time around. I think the XFL could have a place, if they put emphasis on "entertainment", and make their league a spectacle very dissimilar to the NFL game. The closer their product is to the NFL, the lower their chance of success, I think. I think all parties can coexist if the NFL recognizes the AAF as a supplemental entity.
    Interesting way to look at it. A trial run before putting it into the NFL. That could work. Farm system --- Some college players are ready for the the NFL, some could really benefit from a year in a league like this to help them transition to the pros.

    I like that it's not in competition with the NFL, but more of a complement.

    I get the Atlanta at Orlando game. I'll have to check it out.
    Administrator


    #LupusAwareness

    Adopted Bronco: Derek Wolfe --- I adopted: Everyone!

    "a semicolon is used when an author could've chosen to end their sentence, but chose not to. The author is you and the sentence is your life ; "

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    14,169
    Looks like the salt lake stallions get first dibs on bronco players. A few former broncos playing on that team and Rahim Moore is playing for Arizona.

    Adopted Broncos:
    (2011-2013) Eric Decker
    (2014-current) Bradley Roby
    Adopted posters:
    Everyone

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    15,764
    I wont be watching. As much as I love football the older I get the more I appreciate the break in between seasons to do other stuff.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Not where I want to be.
    Posts
    7,237
    What's the overall talent level?

    The thought is that this could be comparable to what would happen if backups on NFL teams played against each other. Multiple players, coaches and Polian himself said they believe their starters could be competitive with the "twos" in the league.

    "What I want the fans to say is that it's real professional football," Polian said.
    Just reading between the lines here but, that sounds like a... he wants to start a NFL JV League...
    http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l7...amp69/asdf.jpg
    "Let's just give them Keenum for an "I owe you".

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    14,169
    Quote Originally Posted by Saddletramp View Post
    Just reading between the lines here but, that sounds like a... he wants to start a NFL JV League...
    That's pretty much what they said. It's a developmental league which should be good for the sport. Because they did go and get coaches that coaches in the nfl. Hopefully they can develop those players that had issues that they didn't have time to fix in the nfl.

    Adopted Broncos:
    (2011-2013) Eric Decker
    (2014-current) Bradley Roby
    Adopted posters:
    Everyone

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    14,169
    Just watched a qb get blown up with the helmet flying off and no flag. I'm impressed lol

    Adopted Broncos:
    (2011-2013) Eric Decker
    (2014-current) Bradley Roby
    Adopted posters:
    Everyone

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    6,035
    Quote Originally Posted by #87Birdman View Post
    Just watched a qb get blown up with the helmet flying off and no flag. I'm impressed lol
    I saw that too; great hit.

    Edit:

    Last edited by Bootleg; 02-10-2019 at 03:01 AM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •