Page 5 of 117 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 15 55 105 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 1745
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Las Manzanitas, NM
    Posts
    30,970
    Quote Originally Posted by JvDub95 View Post
    No secrets I was higher on Jones than I was Lock but he wasn't far behind. I think Lock is going to turn out to be a very good QB. Will he make mistakes??? Absolutely, Brady makes mistakes, Rogers makes mistakes, etc etc. He won't be perfect but he'll be what we need, imo.
    Sure. Manning was fooled from time time by Cover 2 Robber, Zone Blitz, 3-3-5 D, etc. Like George Harrison said, if Drew Lock has his heart set on being an NFL QB, it's gonna take a lot of precious time.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    FORT COLLINS COLORADO
    Posts
    7,819
    Quote Originally Posted by JvDub95 View Post
    No secrets I was higher on Jones than I was Lock but he wasn't far behind. I think Lock is going to turn out to be a very good QB. Will he make mistakes??? Absolutely, Brady makes mistakes, Rogers makes mistakes, etc etc. He won't be perfect but he'll be what we need, imo.
    rodgers has a 4 to 1 td to int ratio the next closest is 2.3 or s to 1. but ya every one makes mistakes if we can get lock to throwing 2 td for every int with his arm talent he could be special

    oakland raders gm
    latavis murray trade bait

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    10,474
    Quote Originally Posted by Hadez View Post
    Reserving my judgement on Lock until I see some NFL regular season action.

    Excited to have him on the Broncos and looking forward to him taking meaningful snaps when he is ready.

    Decades of watching the NFL have taught to wait and watch when it comes to QB prospects
    Reserving my judgment until I see some Hall of Fame game action. LOL

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Las Manzanitas, NM
    Posts
    30,970
    Quote Originally Posted by Buckeye Bronco View Post
    This was a reply to an earlier post that didn't show the other poster's comments. I did it on my phone and something happened. I was responding to this:

    "Save that opinion until after you see both after a year or 2. Haskins could very well be the biggest busy in this draft. College performance means nothing in the grand scheme of things"

    From watching every snap of Haskin's career and half a dozen from the last two years from Lock, I'm confident in saying Haskins is the better QB and it's not close.
    Most college offenses, especially at the FBS level, are Spread/Spread Option from direct snap/gun. QBs from that style of offense must make a quantum leap mentally and physically when they go to the NFL. O-Linemen who have played in that style of offense have difficulty making the transition, too. A few can transcend the differences, but most experience difficulties in making the transition.

    Consequently, player evaluation, particularly for QBs, is a kind of gamble/guessing game. Bill Parcells' seven part criteria is a place for GMs to start, but can't be applied to one year starters or underclassmen. Those guys are more of a risk when picked high in the first round.

    About half the QBs who started in the Super Bowl were not drafted in the first round. QBs who were drafted almost always have athletic talent. What they need to succeed in pro football is: mental capacity; self-discipline; leadership qualities; confidence; excellent work habits; and, being coachable. I think it takes at least a couple of seasons to get a valid impression of how a player is doing.
    "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    1,581
    Quote Originally Posted by samparnell View Post
    QBs who were drafted almost always have athletic talent. What they need to succeed in pro football is: mental capacity; self-discipline; leadership qualities; confidence; excellent work habits; and, being coachable.
    It still fascinates me that it was seemingly impossible for the people who drafted Jamarcus Russell, Ryan Leaf, and Paxton Lynch to notice the absence of those characteristics.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    7,566
    Quote Originally Posted by samparnell View Post
    Most college offenses, especially at the FBS level, are Spread/Spread Option from direct snap/gun. QBs from that style of offense must make a quantum leap mentally and physically when they go to the NFL. O-Linemen who have played in that style of offense have difficulty making the transition, too. A few can transcend the differences, but most experience difficulties in making the transition.

    Consequently, player evaluation, particularly for QBs, is a kind of gamble/guessing game. Bill Parcells' seven part criteria is a place for GMs to start, but can't be applied to one year starters or underclassmen. Those guys are more of a risk when picked high in the first round.

    About half the QBs who started in the Super Bowl were not drafted in the first round. QBs who were drafted almost always have athletic talent. What they need to succeed in pro football is: mental capacity; self-discipline; leadership qualities; confidence; excellent work habits; and, being coachable. I think it takes at least a couple of seasons to get a valid impression of how a player is doing.
    It's interesting reading the article that applies it to this year's class. Rypien and Finley are the only 2 who check all the boxes. But then, like you said, Haskins and Murray only check 2 of the 7 boxes, because they didn't play long enough.

    I always liked Parcells, who I consider the forefather of the "Patriot Way". His hardline QB rules, which I'd never seen before you told me about it, doesn't surprise me at all. It fits his philosophy. I imagine it's a useful baseline evaluation tool where risk/reward is concerned. Parcells was going to win games in his own specific way, and he needed a quarterback he knew with the highest certainty he could do that with. And he probably didn't give a damn what anyone thought about it.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Las Manzanitas, NM
    Posts
    30,970
    Quote Originally Posted by RobertR View Post
    It still fascinates me that it was seemingly impossible for the people who drafted Jamarcus Russell, Ryan Leaf, and Paxton Lynch to notice the absence of those characteristics.
    Draft scouts rely on what the player's college coach(es) say about those characteristics, and they don't always tell the whole truth.

    Russell and Lynch turned out to be lazy and unwilling to cultivate the habits of a pro QB. Digging deeper and widening the number of friends, teammates, coaches and acquaintances interviewed could have revealed enough red flags to change the decision.

    Leaf's shortcomings were more in the area of personality defects, maybe more difficult to detect.

    Scouts have gotten better. Chad Kelly was Mr. Irrelevant. Elway didn't spend his first two picks on a QB, and had previously acquired a veteran while trading another. Lock got picked about where the league projected him. No team this year did a more thorough job of screening QB prospects than Denver.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Las Manzanitas, NM
    Posts
    30,970
    Quote Originally Posted by Spice 1 View Post
    It's interesting reading the article that applies it to this year's class. Rypien and Finley are the only 2 who check all the boxes. But then, like you said, Haskins and Murray only check 2 of the 7 boxes, because they didn't play long enough.

    I always liked Parcells, who I consider the forefather of the "Patriot Way". His hardline QB rules, which I'd never seen before you told me about it, doesn't surprise me at all. It fits his philosophy. I imagine it's a useful baseline evaluation tool where risk/reward is concerned. Parcells was going to win games in his own specific way, and he needed a quarterback he knew with the highest certainty he could do that with. And he probably didn't give a damn what anyone thought about it.
    I always enjoyed watching Parcell's press conferences especially when he was in Dallas. The press corps learned to prepare questions The Tuna would consider relevant. I recommend Bill's memoir.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    2,136
    Quote Originally Posted by samparnell View Post
    Draft scouts rely on what the player's college coach(es) say about those characteristics, and they don't always tell the whole truth.

    Russell and Lynch turned out to be lazy and unwilling to cultivate the habits of a pro QB. Digging deeper and widening the number of friends, teammates, coaches and acquaintances interviewed could have revealed enough red flags to change the decision.

    Leaf's shortcomings were more in the area of personality defects, maybe more difficult to detect.

    Scouts have gotten better. Chad Kelly was Mr. Irrelevant. Elway didn't spend his first two picks on a QB, and had previously acquired a veteran while trading another. Lock got picked about where the league projected him. No team this year did a more thorough job of screening QB prospects than Denver.
    I wonder if NFL scouts could discuss with the prospect players' other collegiate teachers...just to help discern overall academic aptitude? Was student lazy, disinterested in assignments, Albert Einstein Jr., etc.

    It seems that could possibly plug at least a few personality characteristics holes. But either way, it still remains something of a crap shoot.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    the treasure valley, Idaho
    Posts
    16,132
    Quote Originally Posted by Lumiere View Post
    I wonder if NFL scouts could discuss with the prospect players' other collegiate teachers...just to help discern overall academic aptitude? Was student lazy, disinterested in assignments, Albert Einstein Jr., etc.

    It seems that could possibly plug at least a few personality characteristics holes. But either way, it still remains something of a crap shoot.
    When I was a sophomore in high school the varsity basketball coach who happened to be my geometry teacher told me if I didnít turn in every homework assignment for the rest of the year my future in his basketball program was dead. He said my effort in the classroom was a reflection of my work ethic as it translated to basketball.

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    13,778
    I see a lot of Brock Osweiler in Drew Lock, from his skill set, to his college tape, to the way he talks to the media in all honesty, he is a solid prospect. As much as the fan in me wants Drew to be the long term starter and franchise quarterback here, odds are he wont be. It will exciting watching him run around and sling it without a care when he gets onto the field none the less.

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    DENVER
    Posts
    7,470
    Quote Originally Posted by johnlimburg View Post
    I see a lot of Brock Osweiler in Drew Lock, from his skill set, to his college tape, to the way he talks to the media in all honesty, he is a solid prospect. As much as the fan in me wants Drew to be the long term starter and franchise quarterback here, odds are he wont be. It will exciting watching him run around and sling it without a care when he gets onto the field none the less.
    What a weird comparison, they have almost nothing in common.

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Eastern Seaboard
    Posts
    3,327
    I hope Lock plays well!
    I look forward to seeing him play!

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    742
    Quote Originally Posted by samparnell View Post
    About half the QBs who started in the Super Bowl were not drafted in the first round. QBs who were drafted almost always have athletic talent. What they need to succeed in pro football is: mental capacity; self-discipline; leadership qualities; confidence; excellent work habits; and, being coachable. I think it takes at least a couple of seasons to get a valid impression of how a player is doing.
    I think Drew { without knowing him personally } , has 5 of the six traits you speak of....
    The jury is out on the mental capacity...sounds rude....I'm no smart guy....just not sure of his chalk board capability or mental capacity...he has to be somewhat smart....gotta think "ability to read a defense" is part of the mental capacity too. This is the one area that is probably the hardest to judge.

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    742
    Quote Originally Posted by johnlimburg View Post
    I see a lot of Brock Osweiler in Drew Lock, from his skill set, to his college tape, to the way he talks to the media in all honesty, he is a solid prospect. As much as the fan in me wants Drew to be the long term starter and franchise quarterback here, odds are he wont be. It will exciting watching him run around and sling it without a care when he gets onto the field none the less.
    Wow....I just don't see the comparison.......at all....

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •