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Thread: Corona virus

  1. #1246
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    I was thinking a bit about the "distance" in the "distancing". Say I still had a grandmother, and she was a bit elderly. And say I had the flu. If no one in the world suggested how far away I should be, to her, common sense would tell me that it should be at least 6 feet away, and probably not even that close if in a closed in space. I would have been wise to not visit her at all. I would not jeopardize here health. And like folks told us not to come to work with a flu (though many of us were raised to show up), the closest I should have come from them, in an enclosed space, was about the same. I mean, who gave me the right to infect them, even if the flu did not cause them damage, or loss of life. And though we may not have thought this way in past, what if I infected someone because I felt like being there, and they accidentally infected an elderly person, or any vulnerable person?

    If I was still in a career, I would change that about me. I would not be in close proximity to fellow workers if I had an illness that could be easily spread.

    And I would suggest that, whether there's a "distance" to be followed, I would describe this as worse than the flus we have come to know. Therefore the proper distance is what we each believe is safe.....and my gut tells me, safe is not much less than 6. (make that about 6.5 if using the 2 meter rule).

    Common sense. Respect.

    Just my opinion. Nothing more.
    Last edited by CanDB; 05-06-2020 at 02:35 PM.

  2. #1247
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    Our Province, as well as others... are loosening restrictions today. Looks like a 4 phase plan.

    The main message... this will work if everyone doesn’t go nuts....

    And zero large gatherings for the foreseeable future... I think they said only with a vaccination, totally communal immunity, or zero cases anywhere.. so looking way into 2021.
    http://s7.postimg.org/hjr8fcmaz/EM2.jpg

    Adopted Bronco: Andy Janovich

  3. #1248
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    Dec 2015
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    Things I’ve learned during the pandemic:

    Fortunate to be healthy (knock on wood).

    Living in an area with less population density seems beneficial. It’s not sparse but not as crowded as some places. We’ve only had a little over a 100 cases and 1 death, although we don’t know for certain if the death was directly related to Covid-19.

    Our state is slow with re-opening with ambiguity on the plan. Recent reports indicate much will be left up to each county/city which should help.

    I knew I was fortunate to work for a great organization and the pandemic has driven that home. The things we’ve accomplished are amazing, at least from my perspective. We’ve adapted many things to help customers through this time. The things we’ve done to help the medical community are exceptional. Most proud of colleagues who stepped back into their medical profession to help on the front lines. Hopefully we’ll get a vaccine approved.

    The efforts to develop treatments and vaccines are incredible. I’ve been amazed with the speed at which some of the work is being done and the creativity to evaluate existing drugs to treat the virus. The drugs that grab the headlines only scratch the surface.

    Forecast models are worthless when it comes to viruses, and really cause me to be even more skeptical.

    I think our dogs will have separation anxiety when we begin leaving the house more often. The shut down is a dog’s dream.

    Celebrities lecturing about social distancing are the ones likely to break the rules. Chris Cuomo at CNN is a prime example. He broke quarantine when he was infected, only to put the act on like he was coming out of his basement for the first time. Public officials have also broken the orders they tell everyone else to follow. As they threaten to put people in jail they themselves broke the rules.

    Very impressed with the spirt and creativity of business people to adapt. People are fighting for survival - Coronavirus on one side and the crushing weight of being forced to close/limit operations.

  4. #1249
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    COVID-19 Will Mutate — What That Means for a Vaccine

    https://www.healthline.com/health-ne...n-and-covid-19

    As the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 makes its way around the world, there’s been an uptick in predictions that the virus will mutate into something deadlier and become an even scarier threat to humanity.

    “Mutation. The word naturally conjures fears of unexpected and freakish changes,” researchers wrote in a report Trusted Source published in Nature Microbiology in late February. “Ill-informed discussions of mutations thrive during virus outbreaks,” they continued, which is exactly what we’re seeing with SARS-CoV-2.

    But mutations aren’t necessarily a bad thing. Every virus mutates; it’s part of the virus life cycle. Those shifts and changes aren’t always a big deal.

    In some cases, those mutations may actually lead to a weaker virus. Usually, though, the changes are so slight that there’s no noticeable difference in the disease’s transmission and fatality rates.

    The new coronavirus is mutating, but very slowly

    The new coronavirus is an RNA virus: a collection of genetic material packed inside a protein shell.

    Once an RNA virus makes contact with a host, it starts to make new copies of itself that can go on to infect other cells.

    RNA viruses, like the flu and measles, are more prone to changes and mutations compared with DNA viruses, such as herpes, smallpox, and human papillomavirus (HPV).

    “In the world of RNA viruses, change is the norm. We expect RNA viruses to change frequently. That’s just their nature,” said Dr. Mark Schleiss, a pediatric infectious disease specialist and investigator with the Institute for Molecular Virology at the University of Minnesota.

    SARS-CoV-2 is no exception, and over the past few months it has been mutating.

    But the virus has mutated at a very slow pace. And when it does mutate, the new copies aren’t far off from the original virus.

    “The sequences of the original isolates from China are very close to those in viruses circulating in the U.S. and the rest of the world,” said Dr. John Rose, a senior research scientist in the department of pathology at Yale Medicine who’s helping develop a COVID-19 vaccine.

    More contagious?

    Early research from scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory shows that SARS-CoV-2 has mutated into a new form that may be more contagious.

    The new strain is responsible for the vast majority of infections reported around the world since mid-March, according to the new study published in the preprint research website BioRxiv Thursday.

    In total, the researchers identified 14 strains of COVID-19 and released their findings to help those working on vaccines and treatments.

    That being said, the new dominant strain identified does seem to be more infectious in laboratory settings.

    But scientists are now trying to understand how the variation behaves in the body — which may be very different from lab settings. Additionally, the study is in preprint, which means it hasn’t yet been fully peer-reviewed.

    It’s also unclear whether the new mutation infects and sickens people differently. At this time, the illness and hospitalization rates caused by the new variation seems to be similar.

    More data is needed to understand the implications of the new mutations, like whether reinfections after recovery are possible, and whether the changes could affect the vaccines and treatments in development.

    Mutations aren’t making it deadlier

    The virus mutations, like what’s going around in Italy and also New York, don’t seem to be any more infectious or fatal than the original strain that appeared in Wuhan, China, in late December.

    Though there’s the very rare chance a virus could mutate to be more aggressive, if anything, RNA viruses are more likely to mutate into a weaker version.

    “Nearly all mutations will make some part of the virus work less well than before. The most common thing is for mutations to appear and die out again quickly,” said Dr. Benjamin Neuman, the head of the biology department at Texas A&M University-Texarkana.

    But the characteristics and traits of that original strain and its mutations aren’t vastly different from one another.

    What this means for a vaccine

    The mutations likely won’t interfere with the effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccine.

    In fact, the slow and mild nature of the mutations is good news for a vaccine.

    “The virus is still so similar now to the initial sequence that there isn’t really much reason to think the differences will matter in terms of vaccine,” Neuman said.

    Vaccines, in general, tend to target an early version of the virus.

    Take the flu vaccine, for example.

    “The H1N1 annual vaccine is still using a strain from 2009. It’s the ancestor of the various forms that have come after, and while there are differences now, a response against the ancestor seems to give good results against all the descendants,” Neuman said.

    Usually, an older strain of a virus will “preserve enough features” that it will provide immunity against a whole group of variants, Neuman adds.

    But the flu virus mutates fast and erratically from year to year.

    On top of that, our immune system “has a terrible memory for flu viruses,” Neuman said, noting that the immune response to the flu only lasts around a year before we need to get revaccinated.

    Schleiss says a better analogy for COVID-19 is the mumps. For more than 45 years, we’ve had a very effective vaccine for measles, mumps, and rubella (which are also RNA viruses).

    “These viruses have not mutated [enough] to escape the protection provided by the vaccines,” Rose said. The same could very well apply to COVID-19.

    “It should be possible to make an effective COVID-19 vaccine that will provide long-lasting immunity against this particular virus just as we have for many other viruses that do not change rapidly,” Rose added.

    When we finally have a COVID-19 vaccine, it will most likely protect people against the “vast majority of circulating COVID-19 strains for the foreseeable mutations,” Schleiss said.

    Even if random mutations do occur down the road, Schleiss believes the worst-case scenario is that we’ll see some breakthrough infections, but we wouldn’t have breakthrough life-threatening disease.

    Just how long will immunity last?

    It’s still unclear exactly how long immunity will last once a person’s immune system beats the infection.

    Once an infection leaves the body, it leaves markers in the immune system — or antibodies — that can quickly identify and fight the virus if it were to reappear in the future.

    Looking back at the SARS pandemic in 2003, people who had SARSTrusted Source had a strong supply of SARS antibodies for about 2 years, providing them immunity against the virus.

    After about 3 years, those SARS antibodies tapered off, and people had a higher chance of contracting the virus again.

    The timeline with COVID-19 antibodies may be similar.

    Within a few years, we’ll hopefully have enough herd immunity — from a vaccine along with natural immunity from so many people getting sick — to have eradicated the disease so reinfection will no longer be an issue.

    Even if, years down the road, those COVID-19 antibodies wear off and SARS-CoV-2 makes a comeback, our bodies will still remember the infection and be ready to fight.

    “Vaccines confer memory,” Schleiss said. Even if a person no longer has high levels of antibodies because their immunity has worn out, certain cells will mobilize and come into action if they detect the virus.

    “The idea of waning immunity is complicated, and it’s more than just the issue of how soon do your antibodies dissipate and disappear after your vaccination,” Schleiss said.

    Of course, there’s no way to predict exactly what’s going to happen and how long people’s immunity will last.

    “Nature doesn’t work that way,” Schleiss said. “Time will tell.”

    The bottom line

    The new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has already mutated a handful of times, which has many people wondering whether the mutations could lead to a more severe, deadlier disease.

    According to experts, the new mutations are extremely similar to the original virus that appeared in Wuhan, China, and don’t seem to be any more aggressive.

    Because the mutations are so similar, a vaccine would likely protect people against not only the original strain but new mutations as well.

  5. #1250
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    Thank you, Fantastic 7, for all the great updates. They're helping me to keep informed, anyway, and I appreciate your hard work in keeping us advised. Thank you again.

  6. #1251
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lumiere View Post
    Thanks, Sam! I combed through the full text of this Spike mutation study and couldn't find anything pertaining to the effectiveness of preexistent antibodies developed from any former COVID-19 strain, with that of any other newly mutated strain (I think the study was more pertaining to infectious/contagion metrics, but I could be wrong).

    I did find this Live Science article, whatever it may be worth.


    Any little bit of good news...I'll take it.
    The clip from the Live Science article is informative. This aspect was reinforced in the article I posted above.

    The immunity aspect is really tough to pin down. We probably won’t understand it for quite some time. People infected with SARS had immunity for ~2 years and tapered off after 3 years (quoted in the same article above).

    Looking at vaccine development it might not be a one time dose. It could be one dose followed by another 3-4 weeks later. We might need adjuvants to increase efficacy, especially in the elderly population (typically vaccines are less effective ages 50 and up which is one of the reasons we add adjuvants).

    One of the vaccines in development might be delivered with a patch (like a band aid) which has thousands of “nano needles” made from sugar to dissolve into the skin.

  7. #1252
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    Quote Originally Posted by mainBroncos60 View Post
    Thank you, Fantastic 7, for all the great updates. They're helping me to keep informed, anyway, and I appreciate your hard work in keeping us advised. Thank you again.
    Thanks. Just posting information - we really know very little at this point. There are many treatments being studied and the great news is that we already have several drugs that reduce inflammation. What we need to learn is whether or not those drugs work safely in Covid-19 patients to reduce the inflammatory “storm” which is ultimately what does the damage. If you search on IL-6 inhibitor Coronavirus and TNF inhibitor Coronavirus you’ll find information about those topics.

    Remdesivir’s emergency approval is a very positive step. Hopefully the on-going hydroxychloroquine studies will be positive.

    If we can get several treatments approved that could help us build confidence as we wait for a vaccine. More treatments would also help those who choose not to vaccinate.

    Long way to go - we’re making progress.

  8. #1253
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    With some loosening of restrictions in my province this past Monday, I will be interested (and hopeful) in seeing how the "medical stats" go in the next 2 weeks or so, especially those related to hospital care and worst of all, loss of life. Hopefully they will not rise, and in fact decline, so that we can continue our journey back, health and economically improved.

  9. #1254
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    "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

  10. #1255
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    Quote Originally Posted by samparnell View Post
    I knew about his story, but not the Degree part....fantastic!!

    When I first heard of his mask donation, and about his wife's very difficult health situation, and all the other amazing aspects of his act of goodness, I got a little emotional, I will be honest. So unselfish, so honorable!

  11. #1256
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    "Stultum est timere quod vitare non potes." ~ Publilius Syrus

  12. #1257
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    Sports/Broncos/Charity story...

    Tiger Woods and Peyton Manning vs Phil Mickelson and Tom Brady match, on May 24th....for Coronavirus relief.

    Good stuff!!

  13. #1258
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    state Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced that 66% of new hospitalizations are from people who say they have been locked in their homes, according to CNBC.

    Science?

  14. #1259
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    Dec 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by CanDB View Post
    With some loosening of restrictions in my province this past Monday, I will be interested (and hopeful) in seeing how the "medical stats" go in the next 2 weeks or so, especially those related to hospital care and worst of all, loss of life. Hopefully they will not rise, and in fact decline, so that we can continue our journey back, health and economically improved.
    The number of cases will go up everywhere with restrictions being eased, that's just a fact that people will need to accept. The key will be for those in charge not to freak out when the numbers do go up. Hopefully the key indicators (those in hospital, ICU patients and deaths) remain low while the cases do go up though.

    In my province the numbers have started to level out, we've now been below 100 new cases daily since Saturday, and just yesterday we passed the threshold of having more recovered cases than active cases.

    I talked tonight to my friend from your city, and it sounds like your province is in incredible shape at this point. Hopefully the easing of restrictions doesn't change that too much, you guys may end up having a somewhat normal summer.

  15. #1260
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    Quote Originally Posted by Butler By'Note View Post
    The number of cases will go up everywhere with restrictions being eased, that's just a fact that people will need to accept. The key will be for those in charge not to freak out when the numbers do go up. Hopefully the key indicators (those in hospital, ICU patients and deaths) remain low while the cases do go up though.

    In my province the numbers have started to level out, we've now been below 100 new cases daily since Saturday, and just yesterday we passed the threshold of having more recovered cases than active cases.

    I talked tonight to my friend from your city, and it sounds like your province is in incredible shape at this point. Hopefully the easing of restrictions doesn't change that too much, you guys may end up having a somewhat normal summer.
    A normal summer is something I can only dream of, unfortunately. Agreed - it'd be almost shocking if the number of cases decline once things open back up, but the key will be how the hospitals are maintaining and how we adapt to life with the general easing of restrictions. I think it's very likely that in some parts of the US, concerts will be nonexistent, restaurants will be at limited capacity, bars/nightlife will be radically different and in general public places will be less easy-going through the Fall.
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